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6-month CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - a case study from the couple's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165224
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Anders Broström
Peter Johansson
Jan Albers
Jan Wiberg
Eva Svanborg
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. andbr@imv.liu.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):103-12
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure - adverse effects - psychology
Cost of Illness
Fear
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Frustration
Humans
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Obesity, Morbid - complications
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Snoring - etiology - psychology
Social Behavior
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology - psychology
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is independently associated with an increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) can reduce mortality and morbidity, but low compliance rates are seen.
To explore and describe the experiences of CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe OSAS during a 6-month period from the couple's perspective. METHODS AND THE CASE: A single case study with a phenomenographic approach was employed. Diagnostic procedures of OSAS and initiation of treatment with Auto-CPAP, humidifier and a nasal mask were performed during 4 visits. Conceptions were collected at 4 different occasions during the 6-month period (before, and 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment initiation) by means of interviews with a 33-year old male patient and his female partner.
Totally 17 different structural aspects were found to fluctuate during the 6-month period in relation to; influence of stressors, social reactions and adaptation to increase compliance.
An increased knowledge about the influence of stressors, the social reactions, and the adaptation can help healthcare personnel to identify and better understand concerns of other patients and spouses during different time phases of the initial 6-month period of CPAP-treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008 Jun;7(2):89-9018396463
PubMed ID
17291832 View in PubMed
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Absence of response: a study of nurses' experience of stress in the workplace.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183994
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):351-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Brita Olofsson
Claire Bengtsson
Eva Brink
Author Affiliation
Northern Elvsborg County Hospital, University of Trollhättan/Uddevalla, Sweden.
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Sep;11(5):351-8
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Feedback
Frustration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Job Satisfaction
Models, Psychological
Morale
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation Centers
Risk factors
Sweden
Workload
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
It has become clear that nursing is a high-risk occupation with regards to stress-related diseases. In this study, we were interested in nurses' experiences of stress and the emotions arising from stress at work. Results showed that nurses experienced negative stress which was apparently related to the social environment in which they worked. Four nurses were interviewed. The method used was grounded theory. Analysis of the interviews singled out absence of response as the core category. Recurring stressful situations obviously caused problems for the nurses in their daily work. Not only did they lack responses from their supervisors, they also experienced emotions of frustration, powerlessness, hopelessness and inadequacy, which increased the general stress experienced at work. Our conclusion is that the experience of absence of response leads to negative stress in nurses.
PubMed ID
12930542 View in PubMed
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[Caring for persons at the end of life in a curative care unit: privileges and heartbreaks].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145841
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2009;19(3):110-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Marie-Laurence Fortin
Louise Bouchard
Author Affiliation
l''Hôpital Général Juif, 3755 chemin de la Côte Ste-Catherine, Montréal, Québec. mfortin@jgh.mcgill.ca
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2009;19(3):110-6
Date
2009
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Conflict (Psychology)
Empathy
Frustration
Grief
Hospital Units - ethics - organization & administration
Hospitals, University
Humanism
Humans
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations - ethics
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - ethics - organization & administration - psychology
Organizational Culture
Philosophy, Nursing
Professional Autonomy
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Terminal Care - ethics - organization & administration - psychology
Thinking
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe the experience of caring for individuals at the end of life by five nurses working in curative care units. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to gain a better understanding of the meaning nurses give to this experience. The analysis of results, based on Giorgi's phenomenological method (1997), highlighted a central meaning: it is a human experience fraught with paradoxes where the bedside nurse feels both privileged to be accompanying these individuals at the end of their lives and torn between the medical priority given to curative care and the lesser priority given to palliative care. This study offers relevant options for nurse managers wanting to improve these nurses' work environment and the quality of care for individuals at the end of life.
PubMed ID
20101940 View in PubMed
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A chronology of failed advocacy and frustration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164038
Source
Inj Prev. 2007 Apr;13(2):73-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
I B Pless
Source
Inj Prev. 2007 Apr;13(2):73-4
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Canada
Frustration
Government
Humans
Leadership
Patient Advocacy
Wounds and injuries - prevention & control
Notes
Cites: Inj Prev. 2002 Jun;8(2):89-9012120841
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Oct 1;167(7):767-812389840
Cites: Inj Prev. 1998 Dec;4(4):245-69887405
Cites: Pediatrics. 1972 Mar;49(3):420-75010467
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 May;58(5):361-515082730
PubMed ID
17446243 View in PubMed
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Close relatives in intensive care from the perspective of critical care nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163926
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2007 Sep;16(9):1651-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Asa Engström
Siv Söderberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Nursing, Department of Health Science, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden. asa.engstrom@ltu.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2007 Sep;16(9):1651-9
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Cooperative Behavior
Critical Care - organization & administration - psychology
Empathy
Family - psychology
Focus Groups
Frustration
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Morale
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Support
Sweden
Truth Disclosure
Visitors to Patients - psychology
Abstract
The aim was to describe critical care nurses' experiences of close relatives within intensive care.
There is a lack of research describing critical care nurses' experiences of the significance of close relatives in intensive care. Knowledge in this area will support critical care nurses to develop good nursing care for the critically ill person and their close relatives.
The design of the study was qualitative. Data collection was carried out through focus group discussions with 24 critical care nurses in four focus groups during spring 2004. The data were subjected to qualitative thematic content analysis.
The focus groups discussions showed that the presence of close relatives was taken for granted by critical care nurses and it was frustrating if the critically ill person did not have any. Information from close relatives made it possible for critical care nurses to create individual care for the critically ill person. They supported close relatives by giving them information, being near and trying to establish good relations with them. Close relatives were important. Critical care nurses lacked forums for reflection and discussion about the care given.
This study indicates that close relatives are a prerequisite for critical care nurses to give good nursing care to meet the needs of the critically ill person. A communication based on mutual understanding is necessary if critical care nurses are to be able to support close relatives. Dealing constantly with situations that were ethically difficult without any chance to reflect was an obstacle for critical care nurses to improve their work with close relatives.
PubMed ID
17459138 View in PubMed
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Clustering of pelvic floor disorders 20 years after one vaginal or one cesarean birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272086
Source
Int Urogynecol J. 2015 Aug;26(8):1115-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Maria Gyhagen
Sigvard Åkervall
Ian Milsom
Source
Int Urogynecol J. 2015 Aug;26(8):1115-21
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Fecal Incontinence - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Frustration
Humans
Lacerations - epidemiology
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Parity
Pelvic Organ Prolapse - epidemiology - psychology
Perineum - injuries
Prevalence
Registries
Space-Time Clustering
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Incontinence - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
The objective was to assess the prevalence and risk factors for co-occurring pelvic floor disorders (PFDs): urinary incontinence (UI), symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse (sPOP), and fecal incontinence (FI), 20 years after one vaginal (VD) or one cesarean (CS) delivery.
We carried out a registry-based national cohort study of primiparae who delivered during the period 1985-1988 and had no further deliveries. Medical Birth Registry data were linked to data from postal questionnaires distributed 20 years post-partum (response rate 65.2%, n?=?5,236). Main outcome measures were prevalence and risk factors for combined and isolated PFDs.
The prevalence of any PFD was 46.5; 31.7% had one symptom and 14.8% had two or more. Co-occurring symptoms doubled after VD (17.1%) compared with CS (8.4%) (adjOR 2.26; 95% CI 1.84-2.79). The strongest association was observed between VD and having all three symptoms (adjOR 5.20; 95% CI 2.73-9.91), followed by the combination of sPOP and UI (adjOR 3.38; 95% CI 2.24-5.10). The degree of frustration perceived by the women because of pelvic floor dysfunction increased with each additional co-occurring PFD (p?
PubMed ID
25708677 View in PubMed
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Community nurses' experiences of ethical dilemmas in palliative care: a Swedish study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141774
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2010 May;16(5):224-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Margareta Karlsson
Asa Roxberg
António Barbosa da Silva
Ingela Berggren
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West,Trollhättan, Sweden.
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2010 May;16(5):224-31
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Community Health Nursing - education - ethics - organization & administration
Conflict (Psychology)
Decision Making - ethics
Female
Frustration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Home Care Services - ethics - organization & administration
Humans
Models, Nursing
Models, Psychological
Motivation
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - education - ethics - organization & administration - psychology
Palliative Care - ethics - organization & administration - psychology
Patient Advocacy - ethics
Power (Psychology)
Professional Autonomy
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to highlight community nurses' experiences of ethical dilemmas in palliative care.
There are many studies on palliative care but research on how community nurses experience ethical dilemmas in palliative home care is lacking. The ethical dilemmas to which these nurses are exposed seriously challenge their ethical competence.
Seven community nurses described their experiences of ethical dilemmas in palliative home care. The data was analysed by means of qualitative content analysis.
The core themes that emerged were: powerlessness, frustration, and concern in relation to ethical dilemmas in palliative care. The nurses were motivated and felt responsibility for their patients' end of life, and their relatives, and took their duties seriously. They wanted to satisfy all parties; the patient, the relatives and other palliative care professionals.
The study confirms the need for knowledge about how community nurses experience dilemmas in ethical decision-making. They have the freedom to act and the willingness to make decisions, but they lack competence and knowledge about how their colleagues' experience and deal with such issues.
PubMed ID
20679970 View in PubMed
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The destructiveness of laissez-faire leadership behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165465
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2007 Jan;12(1):80-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Anders Skogstad
Ståle Einarsen
Torbjørn Torsheim
Merethe Schanke Aasland
Hilde Hetland
Author Affiliation
University of Bergen, Faculty of Psychology, Bergen, Norway. anders.skogstad@psysp.uib.no
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2007 Jan;12(1):80-92
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggression - psychology
Conflict (Psychology)
Female
Frustration
Hierarchy, Social
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Norway
Organizational Culture
Personnel Management
Questionnaires
Role
Statistics as Topic
Stress, Psychological - complications
Workplace
Abstract
The aim of the study is to test the assumption that laissez-faire leadership behavior is not a type of zero-leadership, but a type of destructive leadership behavior that shows systematic relationships with workplace stressors, bullying at work, and psychological distress. A survey of 2,273 Norwegian employees was conducted and analyzed. Laissez-faire leadership was positively correlated with role conflict, role ambiguity, and conflicts with coworkers. Path modeling showed that these stressors mediated the effects of laissez-faire leadership on bullying at work and that the effects of laissez-faire leadership on distress were mediated through the workplace stressors, especially through exposure to bullying. The results support the assumption that laissez-faire leadership behavior is a destructive leadership behavior.
PubMed ID
17257068 View in PubMed
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Dignity of older people in a nursing home: narratives of care providers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143748
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2010 May;17(3):289-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Rita Jakobsen
Venke Sørlie
Author Affiliation
Lovisenberg Deaconal University College, Oslo, Norway. rita.jakobsen@ldh.no
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2010 May;17(3):289-300
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Conflict (Psychology)
Dementia - nursing
Frustration
Geriatric Nursing - ethics
Health Facility Environment - ethics
Humans
Narration
Norway
Nursing Homes - ethics
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - ethics - psychology
Patient Advocacy - ethics
Personhood
Power (Psychology)
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Restraint, Physical - ethics - psychology
Workload - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to illuminate the ethically difficult situations experienced by care providers working in a nursing home. Individual interviews using a narrative approach were conducted. A phenomenological-hermeneutic method developed for researching life experience was applied in the analysis. The findings showed that care providers experience ethical challenges in their everyday work. The informants in this study found the balance between the ideal, autonomy and dignity to be a daily problem. They defined the culture they work in as not supportive. They also thought they were not being seen and heard in situations where they disagree with the basic values of the organization. The results are discussed in terms of Habermas's understanding of modern society. Care settings for elderly people obviously present ethical challenges, particularly in the case of those suffering from dementia. The care provider participants in this study expressed frustration and feelings of powerlessness. It is possible to understand their experiences in terms of Habermas's theory of modern society and the concept of the system's colonization of the life world.
PubMed ID
20444771 View in PubMed
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[Education. Frustrated? I am only a student nurse].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238077
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1985 Nov 13;85(46):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-13-1985

40 records – page 1 of 4.