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Are Food Advertisements Promoting More Unhealthy Foods and Beverages over Time? Evidence from Three Swedish Food Magazines, 1995-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279943
Source
Ecol Food Nutr. 2017 Jan-Feb;56(1):45-61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Andreas Håkansson
Source
Ecol Food Nutr. 2017 Jan-Feb;56(1):45-61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - trends
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - economics
Beverages - adverse effects - economics
Bread - adverse effects - economics
Consumer Behavior - economics
Dairy Products - adverse effects - economics
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - economics - ethnology
Food - adverse effects - economics
Food Preferences - ethnology
Fruit and Vegetable Juices - adverse effects - economics
Health Promotion - economics - trends
Health Transition
Healthy Diet - economics - trends
Humans
Nutritive Value
Periodicals as Topic - economics
Sweden
Abstract
Unhealthy food in advertising has been suggested as a mediator for the increase in diet-related illness. This study quantitatively investigates changes in food advertising between 1995 and 2014 in terms of food categories promoted, macronutrient content, and percentage of foods classified as heathy or unhealthy from a sample of 7,199 ads from three Swedish food magazines. With the exception of increased alcoholic beverage and decreased carbohydrate-rich-food promotion, no monotonic trends of increasingly unhealthy food advertisement are found. From these findings, it is argued that food magazine advertising is not a mediator of the adverse dietary trend.
PubMed ID
27880047 View in PubMed
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Changes in beverage consumption from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy in the Norwegian Fit for Delivery study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270544
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 May;18(7):1187-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elling Bere
Linda R Sagedal
Ingvild Vistad
Nina C Øverby
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 May;18(7):1187-96
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Animals
Beverages - adverse effects
Coffee - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Educational Status
Female
Fruit and Vegetable Juices
Humans
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Milk
Non-Nutritive Sweeteners - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Norway
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe changes in consumption of different types of beverages from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy, and to examine associations with maternal age, educational level and BMI.
Cross-sectional design. Participants answered an FFQ at inclusion into a randomized controlled trial, the Fit for Delivery (FFD) trial, in median gestational week 15 (range: 9-20), reporting current consumption and in retrospect how often they drank the different beverages pre-pregnancy.
Eight local antenatal clinics in southern Norway from September 2009 to February 2013.
Five hundred and seventy-five healthy pregnant nulliparous women.
Pre-pregnancy, 27 % reported drinking alcohol at least once weekly, compared with none in early pregnancy (P
PubMed ID
25221910 View in PubMed
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Changes in fruit and vegetable consumption habits from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy among Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289259
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 04 04; 17(1):107
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-04-2017
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elling Bere
Linda R Sagedal
Ingvild Vistad
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sports and Nutrition, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604, Kristiansand, Norway. marianne.skreden@uia.no.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 04 04; 17(1):107
Date
04-04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - methods
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Fruit and Vegetable Juices
Habits
Humans
Incidence
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Education as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy outcome
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Single-Blind Method
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Women's health
Young Adult
Abstract
A healthy diet is important for pregnancy outcome and the current and future health of woman and child. The aims of the study were to explore the changes from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy in consumption of fruits and vegetables (FV), and to describe associations with maternal educational level, body mass index (BMI) and age.
Healthy nulliparous women were included in the Norwegian Fit for Delivery (NFFD) trial from September 2009 to February 2013, recruited from eight antenatal clinics in southern Norway. At inclusion, in median gestational week 15 (range 9-20), 575 participants answered a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) where they reported consumption of FV, both current intake and recollection of pre-pregnancy intake. Data were analysed using a linear mixed model.
The percentage of women consuming FV daily or more frequently in the following categories increased from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy: vegetables on sandwiches (13 vs. 17%, p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
28376732 View in PubMed
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Polyphenol-rich juices reduce blood pressure measures in a randomised controlled trial in high normal and hypertensive volunteers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268721
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Oct 14;114(7):1054-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-14-2015
Author
Torunn Elisabeth Tjelle
Linda Holtung
Siv Kjølsrud Bøhn
Kjersti Aaby
Magne Thoresen
Siv Åshild Wiik
Ingvild Paur
Anette Solli Karlsen
Kjetil Retterstøl
Per Ole Iversen
Rune Blomhoff
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Oct 14;114(7):1054-63
Date
Oct-14-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Double-Blind Method
Female
Fruit - chemistry
Fruit and Vegetable Juices - analysis
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Photinia - chemistry
Polyphenols - pharmacology
Prunus - chemistry
Vaccinium myrtillus - chemistry
Vitis - chemistry
Abstract
Intake of fruits and berries may lower blood pressure (BP), most probably due to the high content of polyphenols. In the present study, we tested whether consumption of two polyphenol-rich juices could lower BP. In a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of 12 weeks, 134 healthy individuals, aged 50-70 years, with high normal range BP (130/85-139/89 mmHg, seventy-two subjects) or stage 1-2 hypertension (140/90-179/109 mmHg, sixty-two subjects), were included. They consumed 500 ml/d of one of either (1) a commercially available polyphenol-rich juice based on red grapes, cherries, chokeberries and bilberries; (2) a juice similar to (1) but enriched with polyphenol-rich extracts from blackcurrant press-residue or (3) a placebo juice (polyphenol contents 245·5, 305·2 and 76 mg/100 g, respectively). Resting BP was measured three times, with a 1 min interval, at baseline and after 6 and 12 weeks of intervention. Systolic BP significantly reduced over time (6 and 12 weeks, respectively) in the pooled juice group compared with the placebo group in the first of the three measurements, both for the whole study group (6·9 and 3·4 mmHg; P= 0·01) and even more pronounced in the hypertensive subjects when analysed separately (7·3 and 6·8 mmHg; P= 0·04). The variation in the BP measurements was significantly reduced in the pooled juice group compared with the placebo group (1·4 and 1·7 mmHg; P= 0·03). In conclusion, the present findings suggest that polyphenol-rich berry juice may contribute to a BP- and BP variability lowering effect, being more pronounced in hypertensive than in normotensive subjects.
PubMed ID
26227795 View in PubMed
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Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and genetic predisposition to obesity in 2 Swedish cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283252
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Sep;104(3):809-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Louise Brunkwall
Yan Chen
George Hindy
Gull Rukh
Ulrika Ericson
Inês Barroso
Ingegerd Johansson
Paul W Franks
Marju Orho-Melander
Frida Renström
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Sep;104(3):809-15
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - adverse effects
Body mass index
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Records
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Fruit and Vegetable Juices - adverse effects
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Loci
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrigenomics - methods
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - genetics
Overweight - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prospective Studies
Self Report
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), which has increased substantially during the last decades, has been associated with obesity and weight gain.
Common genetic susceptibility to obesity has been shown to modify the association between SSB intake and obesity risk in 3 prospective cohorts from the United States. We aimed to replicate these findings in 2 large Swedish cohorts.
Data were available for 21,824 healthy participants from the Malmö Diet and Cancer study and 4902 healthy participants from the Gene-Lifestyle Interactions and Complex Traits Involved in Elevated Disease Risk Study. Self-reported SSB intake was categorized into 4 levels (seldom, low, medium, and high). Unweighted and weighted genetic risk scores (GRSs) were constructed based on 30 body mass index [(BMI) in kg/m(2)]-associated loci, and effect modification was assessed in linear regression equations by modeling the product and marginal effects of the GRS and SSB intake adjusted for age-, sex-, and cohort-specific covariates, with BMI as the outcome. In a secondary analysis, models were additionally adjusted for putative confounders (total energy intake, alcohol consumption, smoking status, and physical activity).
In an inverse variance-weighted fixed-effects meta-analysis, each SSB intake category increment was associated with a 0.18 higher BMI (SE = 0.02; P = 1.7 × 10(-20); n = 26,726). In the fully adjusted model, a nominal significant interaction between SSB intake category and the unweighted GRS was observed (P-interaction = 0.03). Comparing the participants within the top and bottom quartiles of the GRS to each increment in SSB intake was associated with 0.24 (SE = 0.04; P = 2.9 × 10(-8); n = 6766) and 0.15 (SE = 0.04; P = 1.3 × 10(-4); n = 6835) higher BMIs, respectively.
The interaction observed in the Swedish cohorts is similar in magnitude to the previous analysis in US cohorts and indicates that the relation of SSB intake and BMI is stronger in people genetically predisposed to obesity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27465381 View in PubMed
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Validation of an online food frequency questionnaire against doubly labelled water and 24 h dietary recalls in pre-school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283541
Source
Nutrients. 2017 Jan 13;9(1)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-13-2017
Author
Christine Delisle Nyström
Hanna Henriksson
Christina Alexandrou
Anna Bergström
Stephanie Bonn
Katarina Bälter
Marie Löf
Source
Nutrients. 2017 Jan 13;9(1)
Date
Jan-13-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Composition
Body mass index
Body Weight
Candy
Child, Preschool
Diet
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
Exercise
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit and Vegetable Juices
Healthy Diet
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Mental Recall
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Sedentary lifestyle
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Water
Abstract
The development of easy-to-use and accurate methods to assess the intake of energy, foods and nutrients in pre-school children is needed. KidMeal-Q is an online food frequency questionnaire developed for the LifeGene prospective cohort study in Sweden. The aims of this study were to compare: (i) energy intake (EI) obtained using KidMeal-Q to total energy expenditure (TEE) measured via doubly labelled water and (ii) the intake of certain foods measured using KidMeal-Q to intakes acquired by means of 24 h dietary recalls in 38 children aged 5.5 years. The mean EI calculated using KidMeal-Q was statistically different (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28098765 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.