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4-Nonylphenol and bisphenol A in Swedish food and exposure in Swedish nursing women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125631
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Irina Gyllenhammar
Anders Glynn
Per Ola Darnerud
Sanna Lignell
Rob van Delft
Marie Aune
Author Affiliation
National Food Agency, P.O. Box 622, 75126 Uppsala, Sweden. irina.gyllenhammar@slv.se
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Benzhydryl Compounds
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Endocrine Disruptors - analysis - blood - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood - metabolism
Female
Food analysis
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Meat - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Phenols - analysis - blood - metabolism
Sweden
Vegetables - chemistry
Young Adult
Abstract
4-Nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) are phenolic substances used in high volumes by the industry. Studies on cells and in experimental animals have shown that both these compounds can be classified as estrogenic hormone disrupters. Information about the exposure of humans to NP and BPA is still scarce, especially regarding levels in human blood. The first aim of this study was to investigate possible sources of NP and BPA exposure from food, by analyzing the levels of NP and BPA from a Swedish food market basket, based on the Swedish per capita food consumption. A second aim was to investigate blood serum levels of NP and BPA, as well as NP-ethoxylates, among young women in Sweden (n=100). Moreover, associations between food consumption and blood NP and BPA levels were studied. In food, NP was to some extent found at levels above limit of quantification (LOQ 20 ng/g fresh weight) in fruits, cereal products, vegetables, and potatoes. BPA levels above LOQ (2 ng/g fresh weight) were found in fish, meats, potatoes, and dairy products. The estimated mean intakes per capita were (medium bound) 27 µg NP/day and 3.9 µg BPA/day, showing that food is a source of BPA and NP in the general Swedish population. In blood serum, free NP above limit of detection (LOD 0.5 ng/g) was detected in 46% of the study participants while detectable levels of total NP (LOD 0.8 ng/g) were observed in 43%. The corresponding percentages for BPA were 25% and 22%, respectively. The results indicate that there is a continuous source of exposure to NP and BPA that is high enough for free NP and BPA to be detected in some consumers. Among the participants with quantifiable levels of free and total NP (n=38), 85% (median, range: 38-112%) of the NP was present as free NP. For BPA 76% (49-109%) was detected as free BPA (n=15). All women had levels of ethoxylates of NP below LOD (0.1-0.7 ng/g). A significantly higher total consumption of fruits and vegetables was reported in questionnaires by participants with NP levels at or above LOD than among women with levels below LOD. This result is supporting the market basket results of relatively high NP levels in these types of food.
PubMed ID
22466019 View in PubMed
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210Po, 210Pb, 40K and 137Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms and ingestion doses to man from high consumption rates of these wild foods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119426
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2013 Feb;116:34-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Justin P Gwynn
Anna Nalbandyan
Geir Rudolfsen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, The Fram Centre, N-9296 Tromsø, Norway. justin.gwynn@nrpa.no
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2013 Feb;116:34-41
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry
Angiosperms
Basidiomycota
Eating
Food Contamination, Radioactive - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Norway
Radiation Dosage
Radiation monitoring
Radioisotopes - analysis
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
This paper discusses activity concentrations of (210)Po, (210)Pb, (40)K and (137)Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms collected from Øvre Dividalen national park, Northern Norway and derives committed effective ingestion doses to man based on high consumption rates of these wild foods. Edible wild berries and mushrooms accumulated similar levels of (210)Pb, but mushrooms accumulated higher levels of (210)Po and (40)K than berries. There appears to be a clear difference in the ability of Leccinum spp. of fungi to accumulate (210)Po and/or translocate (210)Po to mushrooms compared to Russula spp. of fungi. Activity concentrations of (137)Cs in edible wild berries and mushrooms from Øvre Dividalen national park reflected the lower levels of fallout of this radionuclide in Northern Norway compared to more central areas following the Chernobyl accident. For mushrooms, ingestion doses are dominated by (210)Po, while for berries, (40)K is typically the main contributor to dose. Based on high consumption rates, ingestion doses arising from the combination of (210)Po, (210)Pb and (40)K were up to 0.05 mSv/a for berries and 0.50 mSv/a for mushrooms. Consumption of such wild foods may result in a significant contribution to total annual doses when consumed in large quantities, particularly when selecting mushrooms species that accumulate high activity concentrations of (210)Po.
PubMed ID
23103573 View in PubMed
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Alaskan wild berry resources and human health under the cloud of climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146583
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Apr 14;58(7):3884-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-2010
Author
Joshua Kellogg
Jinzhi Wang
Courtney Flint
David Ribnicky
Peter Kuhn
Elvira González De Mejia
Ilya Raskin
Mary Ann Lila
Author Affiliation
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA.
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Apr 14;58(7):3884-900
Date
Apr-14-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Anthocyanins - analysis - pharmacology
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Cell Line
Climate change
Fruit - chemistry
Health
Humans
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Obesity - drug therapy
Plant Extracts - analysis - metabolism - pharmacology
Random Allocation
Rosaceae - chemistry
Abstract
Wild berries are integral dietary components for Alaska Native people and a rich source of polyphenolic metabolites that can ameliorate metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. In this study, five species of wild Alaskan berries (Vaccinium ovalifolium , Vaccinium uliginosum , Rubus chamaemorus , Rubus spectabilis , and Empetrum nigrum) were screened for bioactivity through a community-participatory research method involving three geographically distinct tribal communities. Compositional analysis by HPLC and LC-MS(2) revealed substantial site-specific variation in anthocyanins (0.01-4.39 mg/g of FW) and proanthocyanidins (0.74-6.25 mg/g of FW) and identified A-type proanthocyanidin polymers. R. spectabilis increased expression levels of preadipocyte factor 1 (182%), and proanthocyanidin-enriched fractions from other species reduced lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Selected extracts reduced serum glucose levels in C57BL/6J mice by up to 45%. Local observations provided robust insights into effects of climatic fluctuations on berry abundance and quality, and preliminary site-specific compositional and bioactivity differences were noted, suggesting the need to monitor this Alaska Native resource as climate shifts affect the region.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20025229 View in PubMed
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Aniline in vegetable and fruit samples from the Canadian total diet study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149118
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2009 Jun;26(6):808-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Xu-Liang Cao
Jiping Zhu
Stephen Macdonald
Kaela Lalonde
Bob Dabeka
Mamady Cisse
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division, Bureau of Chemical Safety, Food Directorate, HPFB, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9. xu-liang_cao@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2009 Jun;26(6):808-13
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aniline Compounds - analysis
Canada
Carcinogens - analysis
Diet
Diet Surveys
Food contamination - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry - methods
Humans
Malus - chemistry
Reference Standards
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
An isotope dilution method based on solvent extraction followed by GC-MS analysis was developed and used to determine aniline in vegetable and fruit samples collected from the Canadian total diet study. Aniline was not detected in any of the 23 vegetable samples from the 2005 total diet study at a method detection limit of 0.01 mg kg(-1). Among the 16 fruit samples, it was detected only in apple samples, with an average concentration of 0.278 mg kg(-1). Aniline was not detected in apple samples collected in the 2002, 2003, 2006 or 2007 total diet studies, but it was detected in the apple samples collected from the 2001 and 2004 studies, at concentrations of 0.085 and 0.468 mg kg(-1), respectively. The average aniline concentration for the 2001, 2004 and 2005 apple samples was 0.277 mg kg(-1). Good repeatability of the method was observed with replicate analysis of apple samples, with relative standard deviations (RSD) ranging 3.8-21% and an average of 11%.
PubMed ID
19680954 View in PubMed
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Anti-diabetic and hypoglycaemic effects of Momordica charantia (bitter melon): a mini review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147996
Source
Br J Nutr. 2009 Dec;102(12):1703-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Lawrence Leung
Richard Birtwhistle
Jyoti Kotecha
Susan Hannah
Sharon Cuthbertson
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Centre for Studies in Primary Care, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. leungl@queensu.ca
Source
Br J Nutr. 2009 Dec;102(12):1703-8
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AMP-Activated Protein Kinases
Animals
Clinical Trials as Topic
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - drug therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Female
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - administration & dosage
Male
Momordica charantia - adverse effects - chemistry
Phytotherapy
Plant Extracts - administration & dosage
Plant Leaves - chemistry
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Rats
Seeds - chemistry
Triterpenes - analysis
Abstract
It has been estimated that up to one-third of patients with diabetes mellitus use some form of complementary and alternative medicine. Momordica charantia (bitter melon) is a popular fruit used for the treatment of diabetes and related conditions amongst the indigenous populations of Asia, South America, India and East Africa. Abundant pre-clinical studies have documented the anti-diabetic and hypoglycaemic effects of M. charantia through various postulated mechanisms. However, clinical trial data with human subjects are limited and flawed by poor study design and low statistical power. The present article reviews the clinical data regarding the anti-diabetic potentials of M. charantia and calls for better-designed clinical trials to further elucidate its possible therapeutic effects.
PubMed ID
19825210 View in PubMed
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Antioxidant activity and antimicrobial effect of berry phenolics--a Finnish perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163640
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Jun;51(6):684-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Marina Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Food Chemistry, University of Helsinki, Finland. marina.heinonen@helsinki.fi
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Jun;51(6):684-91
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Infective Agents - pharmacology
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Diet
Finland
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Fruit - chemistry
Health promotion
Humans
Phenols - analysis
Phytotherapy
Abstract
In Finland, berries are part of the traditional diet significantly contributing to the intake of flavonoids and other phenolic compounds. Compositional data on phenolic compounds in berries has been rapidly accumulating and included in the national food composition database. Among the different bioactive substances in berries, phenolic compounds including flavonoids, tannins, and phenolic acids have received considerable interest due to their effects in food and health. A great amount of in vitro evidence exists showing that berry phenolics are powerful antioxidants. However, the antioxidant effect of berry phenolics is strongly dependent on the choice of berry raw material, as the antioxidant activity differs between the different phenolic constituents, including anthocyanins, ellagitannins, and proanthocyanidins. In foods, the antioxidant effect is also influenced by the structure of food. Tannin-containing berries exhibit antimicrobial properties against pathogenic bacteria, thus offering many new applications for food industry. Much of the interest in berry phenolics has focused on cranberries and both cultivated and wild blueberries, although also other berries including black currants, cloudberries, lingonberries, and red raspberries possess promising bioactivities that may have relevance to human health. Antioxidant activity of berry phenolics, in addition to other mechanisms, may contribute to human health, but the possible relationship remains yet to be scientifically substantiated.
PubMed ID
17492800 View in PubMed
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Antioxidant activity relates to plant part, life form and growing condition in some diabetes remedies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163311
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2007 Jul 25;112(3):461-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-25-2007
Author
Letitia M McCune
Timothy Johns
Author Affiliation
Department of Plant Science, Macdonald Campus, McGill University, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, Canada. letitiamccune@msn.com
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 2007 Jul 25;112(3):461-9
Date
Jul-25-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Biphenyl Compounds
Canada
Diabetes Mellitus - drug therapy
Ecosystem
Flowers - chemistry
Free Radical Scavengers - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Picrates - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Plant Bark - chemistry
Plant Extracts - isolation & purification - therapeutic use
Plant Leaves - chemistry
Plant Roots - chemistry
Plants, Medicinal - chemistry - classification - growth & development
Abstract
Selection, collection and preparation of 35 plant species used by traditional healers in the boreal regions of Canada for treatment of the symptoms of diabetes were supported empirically by antioxidant activity of the plants. Because antioxidants fluctuate with growth parameters and environmental factors, these remedies were evaluated in relation to the affect of plant part, life form and growing condition on the level of activity. The parts used here more frequently as medicines were roots and bark. Activity (IC(50)) of the bark extracts used medicinally averaged to 21.38+/-3.84 ppm while root extracts used medicinally had an IC(50) of 185.11+/-32.18 ppm in a free radical DPPH assay. In contrast the analysis of extracts of overall parts (medicinal or not) in these species found leaves and bark to have the least activity (112.22+/-30.63 ppm and 123.02+/-21.13 ppm, respectively). The highest activity was found in tree extracts (24.88+/-3.32 ppm) as compared to herbs and shrubs, and increased activity was found in plant extracts from growing conditions of decreased water/fertility. The antioxidant activity of these traditional plant remedies have the potential to be partially deduced through environment signals interpreted by the traditional herbalist.
PubMed ID
17532584 View in PubMed
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The antioxidant level of Alaska's wild berries: high, higher and highest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284324
Source
Pages 796-802 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):796-802
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Dinstel RR
Cascio J
Koukel S
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA.
Source
Pages 796-802 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):796-802
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Antioxidants/analysis
Blueberry Plants/chemistry
Food Handling
Fruit/chemistry
Nutritive Value
Vaccinium vitis-idaea/chemistry
Viburnum/chemistry
Abstract
BACKGROUND:In the last few years, antioxidants have become the stars of the nutritional world. Antioxidants are important in terms of their ability to protect against oxidative cell damage that can lead to conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease, cancer and heart disease--conditions also linked with chronic inflammation. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of Alaska's wild berries may have the potential to help prevent these diseases. OBJECTIVE: To discover the antioxidant levels of Alaska wild berries and the ways these antioxidant levels translate when preservation methods are applied to the berry. DESIGN: This research centered on both the raw berries and products made from the berries. In the first year, a variety of wild berries were tested to discover their oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC) in the raw berries. The second level of the research project processed 4 different berries--blueberries, lingonberries, salmonberries, highbush cranberries--into 8 or 9 products made from these berries. The products were tested for both ORAC as well as specific antioxidants. RESULTS: The Alaska wild berries collected and tested in the first experiment ranged from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC value than cultivated berries from the lower 48 states. For instance, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85. This is also higher than lower 48 wild blueberries, which had a score of 61. All of the Alaskan berries tested have a level of antioxidant considered nutritionally valuable, ranging from 19 for watermelon berries to 206 for lingonberries on the ORAC scale. With the processed products made from 4 Alaska wild berries, one of the unexpected outcomes of the research was that the berries continued to have levels of antioxidants considered high, despite the effects of commonly used heat-processing techniques. When berries were dehydrated, per gram ORAC values increased. CONCLUSION: Alaska wild berries have extraordinarily high antioxidant levels. Though cooking lowered the antioxidant level, and adding ingredients such as sugar diluted the antioxidant concentration, products made from berries are high sources of antioxidants.
Documents
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Antiproliferative effect of Angelica archangelica fruits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17096
Source
Z Naturforsch [C]. 2004 Jul-Aug;59(7-8):523-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Steinthor Sigurdsson
Helga M Ogmundsdottir
Sigmundur Gudbjarnason
Author Affiliation
Science Institute, University of Iceland, Vatnsmyrarvegur 16, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland. sts@raunvis.hi.is
Source
Z Naturforsch [C]. 2004 Jul-Aug;59(7-8):523-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angelica archangelica - chemistry
Cell Division - drug effects
Cell Line, Tumor
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Methoxsalen - isolation & purification - toxicity
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Plant Extracts - chemistry - isolation & purification - toxicity
Psoralens - isolation & purification - toxicity
Abstract
The aim of this work was to study the antiproliferative effect of a tincture from fruits of Angelica archangelica and the active components using the human pancreas cancer cell line PANC-1 as a model. Significant dose-dependent antiproliferative activity was observed in the tincture with an EC50 value of 28.6 microg/ml. Strong antiproliferative activity resulted from the two most abundant furanocoumarins in the tincture, imperatorin and xanthotoxin. The contribution of terpenes to this activity was insignificant. Imperatorin and xanthotoxin proved to be highly antiproliferative, with EC50 values of 2.7 microg/ml and 3.7 microg/ml, respectively, equivalent to 10 and 17 microM. The results indicate that furanocoumarins account for most of the antiproliferative activity of the tincture.
PubMed ID
15813373 View in PubMed
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Arctic berry extracts target the gut-liver axis to alleviate metabolic endotoxaemia, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obese mice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297424
Source
Diabetologia. 2018 04; 61(4):919-931
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Fernando F Anhê
Thibault V Varin
Mélanie Le Barz
Geneviève Pilon
Stéphanie Dudonné
Jocelyn Trottier
Philippe St-Pierre
Cory S Harris
Michel Lucas
Mélanie Lemire
Éric Dewailly
Olivier Barbier
Yves Desjardins
Denis Roy
André Marette
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Cardiology Axis of the Québec Heart and Lung Institute, Laval University, Bureau Y4340, Québec City, QC, G1V 4G5, Canada.
Source
Diabetologia. 2018 04; 61(4):919-931
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
C-Peptide - blood
Diet, High-Fat
Endotoxemia - metabolism
Fatty Liver - drug therapy - metabolism
Fruit - chemistry
Glucose - metabolism
Homeostasis
Insulin - blood - metabolism
Insulin Resistance
Intestines - drug effects
Liver - drug effects - metabolism
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Mice, Obese
Obesity - metabolism
Plant Extracts - pharmacology
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Time Factors
Abstract
There is growing evidence that fruit polyphenols exert beneficial effects on the metabolic syndrome, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study, we aimed to analyse the effects of polyphenolic extracts from five types of Arctic berries in a model of diet-induced obesity.
Male C57BL/6 J mice were fed a high-fat/high-sucrose (HFHS) diet and orally treated with extracts of bog blueberry (BBE), cloudberry (CLE), crowberry (CRE), alpine bearberry (ABE), lingonberry (LGE) or vehicle (HFHS) for 8 weeks. An additional group of standard-chow-fed, vehicle-treated mice was included as a reference control for diet-induced obesity. OGTTs and insulin tolerance tests were conducted, and both plasma insulin and C-peptide were assessed throughout the OGTT. Quantitative PCR, western blot analysis and ELISAs were used to assess enterohepatic immunometabolic features. Faecal DNA was extracted and 16S rRNA gene-based analysis was used to profile the gut microbiota.
Treatment with CLE, ABE and LGE, but not with BBE or CRE, prevented both fasting hyperinsulinaemia (mean ± SEM [pmol/l]: chow 67.2?±?12.3, HFHS 153.9?±?19.3, BBE 114.4?±?14.3, CLE 82.5?±?13.0, CRE 152.3?±?24.4, ABE 90.6?±?18.0, LGE 95.4?±?10.5) and postprandial hyperinsulinaemia (mean ± SEM AUC [pmol/l?×?min]: chow 14.3?±?1.4, HFHS 31.4?±?3.1, BBE 27.2?±?4.0, CLE 17.7?±?2.2, CRE 32.6?±?6.3, ABE 22.7?±?18.0, LGE 23.9?±?2.5). None of the berry extracts affected C-peptide levels or body weight gain. Levels of hepatic serine phosphorylated Akt were 1.6-, 1.5- and 1.2-fold higher with CLE, ABE and LGE treatment, respectively, and hepatic carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)-1 tyrosine phosphorylation was 0.6-, 0.7- and 0.9-fold increased in these mice vs vehicle-treated, HFHS-fed mice. These changes were associated with reduced liver triacylglycerol deposition, lower circulating endotoxins, alleviated hepatic and intestinal inflammation, and major gut microbial alterations (e.g. bloom of Akkermansia muciniphila, Turicibacter and Oscillibacter) in CLE-, ABE- and LGE-treated mice.
Our findings reveal novel mechanisms by which polyphenolic extracts from ABE, LGE and especially CLE target the gut-liver axis to protect diet-induced obese mice against metabolic endotoxaemia, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis, which importantly improves hepatic insulin clearance. These results support the potential benefits of these Arctic berries and their integration into health programmes to help attenuate obesity-related chronic inflammation and metabolic disorders.
All raw sequences have been deposited in the public European Nucleotide Archive server under accession number PRJEB19783 ( https://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/data/view/PRJEB19783 ).
PubMed ID
29270816 View in PubMed
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