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An assessment of the barriers to accessing food among food-insecure people in Cobourg, Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133167
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Jun;31(3):121-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
S. Tsang
A M Holt
E. Azevedo
Author Affiliation
Chronic Disease & Injury Prevention Department, Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit, Port Hope, Ontario, Canada. stsang@hkpr.on.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Jun;31(3):121-8
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Food Services
Food Supply - economics
Fruit - economics - supply & distribution
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Poverty
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Transportation
Vegetables - economics - supply & distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
Low-income people are most vulnerable to food insecurity; many turn to community and/or charitable food programs to receive free or low-cost food. This needs assessment aims to collect information on the barriers to accessing food programs, the opportunities for improving food access, the barriers to eating fresh vegetables and fruit, and the opportunities to increasing their consumption among food-insecure people in Cobourg, Ontario.
We interviewed food program clients using structured individual interviews consisting of mostly opened-ended questions.
Food program clients identified barriers to using food programs as lack of transportation and the food programs having insufficient quantities of food or inconvenient operating hours. They also stated a lack of available vegetables and fruit at home, and income as barriers to eating more vegetables and fruit, but suggested a local fresh fruit and vegetable bulk-buying program called "Good Food Box" and community gardens as opportunities to help increase their vegetable and fruit intake.
Many of the barriers and opportunities identified can be addressed by working with community partners to help low-income individuals become more food secure.
PubMed ID
21733349 View in PubMed
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Association between fruit and vegetable consumption in mothers and children in low-income, urban neighborhoods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166274
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2007 Oct;34(5):723-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Marie-Pierre Sylvestre
Jennifer O'Loughlin
Katherine Gray-Donald
James Hanley
Gilles Paradis
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. marie-pierre.sylvestre@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2007 Oct;34(5):723-34
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Continental Population Groups
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mothers
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Vegetables
Abstract
To understand factors influencing fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption in children, the authors studied the association between F&V consumption in mothers and children in a sample of 1,106 boys and girls in Grades 4-6 in 24 elementary schools in low-income, multiethnic neighborhoods in Montreal, Canada. Approximately 10% of girls and 19% of boys reported not having eaten any vegetables in the week prior to questionnaire administration; 53% of girls and 63% of boys did not consume whole fruits daily. Each unit increase in F&V consumption in mothers was associated with a 10% to 20% increase in F&V consumption in children. Interventions to improve F&V consumption should aim to improve awareness among parents of the importance of fruits and vegetables and of the impact of their own behavior on their children's F&V consumption.
PubMed ID
17142242 View in PubMed
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Associations between physical home environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5-year-olds: the BRA-study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290267
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 May; 20(7):1173-1183
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
May-2017
Author
Anne Lene Kristiansen
Mona Bjelland
Anne Himberg-Sundet
Nanna Lien
Lene Frost Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition,Institute of Basic Medical Sciences,University of Oslo,PO Box 1046 Blindern,0316 Oslo,Norway.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 May; 20(7):1173-1183
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Child, Preschool
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Norway
Nutrition Assessment
Parent-Child Relations
Pilot Projects
Principal Component Analysis
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
First, to explore item pools developed to measure the physical home environment of pre-school children and assess the psychometric properties of these item pools; second, to explore associations between this environment and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5-year-olds.
Data were collected in three steps: (i) a parental web-based questionnaire assessing the child's vegetable intake and factors potentially influencing the child's vegetable consumption; (ii) direct observation of the children's fruit, berry and vegetable intakes at two meals in one day in the kindergarten; and (iii) a parental web-based 24 h recall.
The target group for this study was pre-school children born in 2010 and 2011, attending public or private kindergartens in the counties of Vestfold and Buskerud, Norway.
A total of 633 children participated.
Principal component analysis on the thirteen-item pool assessing availability/accessibility resulted in two factors labelled 'availability at home' and 'accessibility at home', while the eight-item pool assessing barriers resulted in two factors labelled 'serving barriers' and 'purchase barriers'. The psychometric properties of these factors were satisfactory. Linear regression of the associations between vegetable intake and the factors showed generally positive associations with 'availability at home' and 'accessibility at home' and negative associations with 'serving barriers'.
This age group has so far been understudied and there is a need for comparable studies. Our findings highlight the importance of targeting the physical home environment of pre-school children in future interventions as there are important modifiable factors that both promote and hinder vegetable consumption in this environment.
PubMed ID
27995831 View in PubMed
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Associations between sociocultural home environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5-year olds: BRA-study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291600
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:310-320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-01-2017
Author
Anne Lene Kristiansen
Mona Bjelland
Anne Himberg-Sundet
Nanna Lien
Lene Frost Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, PO Box 1046 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: a.l.kristiansen@medisin.uio.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:310-320
Date
Oct-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - ethnology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Female
Fruit
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Healthy Diet - ethnology
Humans
Male
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Parenting - ethnology
Parents
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Principal Component Analysis
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
The home environment is the first environment to shape childhood dietary habits and food preferences, hence greater understanding of home environmental factors associated with vegetable consumption among young children is needed. The objective has been to examine questionnaire items developed to measure the sociocultural home environment of children focusing on vegetables and to assess the psychometric properties of the resulting factors. Further, to explore associations between the environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5 year olds. Parents (n 633) were invited to participate and filled in a questionnaire assessing the child's vegetable intake and factors potentially influencing this, along with a 24-h recall of their child's fruit and vegetable intake. Children's fruit and vegetable intakes at two meals in one day in the kindergarten were observed by researchers. Principal components analysis was used to examine items assessing the sociocultural home environment. Encouragement items resulted in factors labelled "reactive encouragement", "child involvement" and "reward". Modelling items resulted in the factors labelled "active role model" and "practical role model". Items assessing negative parental attitudes resulted in the factor labelled "negative parental attitudes" and items assessing family pressure/demand resulted in the factor labelled "family demand". The psychometric properties of the factors were for most satisfactory. Linear regression of the associations between vegetable intake and the factors showed, as expected, generally positive associations with "child involvement", "practical role model" and "family demand", and negative associations with "negative parental attitudes" and "reward". Unexpectedly, "reactive encouragement" was negatively associated with vegetable consumption. In conclusion, associations between sociocultural home environmental factors and children's vegetable consumption showed both expected and unexpected associations some of which differed by maternal education - pointing to a need for further comparable studies.
PubMed ID
28676449 View in PubMed
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Associations of television viewing, physical activity and dietary behaviours with obesity in aboriginal and non-aboriginal Canadian youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143787
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Sep;13(9):1430-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Carmina Ng
T Kue Young
Paul N Corey
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. carmina.ng@utoronto.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Sep;13(9):1430-7
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise - physiology
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Students - statistics & numerical data
Television - statistics & numerical data
Vegetables
Abstract
To determine associations of diet, physical activity and television (TV) viewing time with obesity among aboriginal and non-aboriginal youth in conjunction with socio-economic variables.
Cross-sectional study of differences between aboriginal and non-aboriginal groups and associations between lifestyle and socio-economic factors with obesity were examined.
Population data from the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 2.2 conducted in 2004 in the ten provinces of Canada.
A total of 198 aboriginal and 4448 non-aboriginal Canadian youth aged 12-17 years.
Compared to non-aboriginal youth, physical activity participation among aboriginal youth was higher, but consumption of vegetables and dairy products was lower, and more aboriginal youth were 'high' TV watchers. Low income adequacy was associated with decreased odds for obesity among aboriginal youth in contrast to higher odds among non-aboriginal youth. Non-aboriginal 'high' TV watchers consumed more soft drinks and non-whole-grain products than did 'low' TV watchers. Physical activity participation did not differ between 'high' and 'low' TV watchers for both groups, and was associated with lowered odds for obesity only among aboriginal youth.
Sociodemographic and lifestyle risk factors associated with obesity differ between aboriginal and non-aboriginal youth. These findings may be useful for guiding intervention efforts.
PubMed ID
20441661 View in PubMed
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Changes in socio-economic differences in food habits over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134632
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Nov;14(11):1919-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Tina Seiluri
Eero Lahelma
Ossi Rahkonen
Tea Lallukka
Author Affiliation
Hjelt Institute, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, PO Box 41, FIN-00014, Helsinki, Finland. tina.seiluri@helsinki.fi
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Nov;14(11):1919-26
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Female
Finland
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Fruit
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
To examine absolute socio-economic differences in food habits and their changes over time.
A longitudinal study using the cohort baseline mail surveys conducted in 2000-2002 (n 8960, response rate 67 %) and the follow-up in 2007 (n 7332, response rate 83 %), including data on seven food habits recommended in the national dietary guidelines, as well as socio-economic and sociodemographic variables.
Data from the Helsinki Health Study survey, followed up for 5-7 years.
Municipal employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland.
Apart from fish and vegetable-based margarine on bread, the proportions of the recommended food items were higher for women than for men. The consumption of the recommended food items either increased or remained stable over the follow-up period. On the basis of the slope index of inequality (SII) it was observed that socio-economic differences widened with regard to the consumption of fresh vegetables and fish and use of vegetable-based margarine or oil in cooking, with the upper classes consuming these foods more often. The largest differences were observed in the consumption of fresh vegetables, for which the SII value among women was 2·38 (95 % CI 1·93, 2·95) at baseline and 2·47 (95 % CI 2·01, 3·03) at follow-up, and 3·36 (95 % CI 1·80, 6·28) and 3·47 (95 % CI 1·95, 6·19) for men, respectively. Socio-economic differences were non-existent for milk, and the reverse was observed for dark bread and vegetable-based margarine on bread.
Consumption of the recommended food items increased in the examined cohort over time. This increase was mostly similar throughout the socio-economic groups and thus the socio-economic differences remained stable. The upper classes followed the guidelines better with regard to the consumption of vegetables and fish and in the use of vegetable-based margarine or oil in cooking.
PubMed ID
21557869 View in PubMed
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Changes to the school food and physical activity environment after guideline implementation in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256767
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11:50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Allison W Watts
Louise C Mâsse
Patti-Jean Naylor
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, F508-4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6H 3V4, Canada. lmasse@cfri.ubc.ca.
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11:50
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Food Services - standards
Fruit
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Motor Activity
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Status
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Physical Education and Training
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics
Schools
Socioeconomic Factors
Students
Vegetables
Abstract
High rates of childhood obesity have generated interest among policy makers to improve the school food environment and increase students' levels of physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine school-level changes associated with implementation of the Food and Beverage Sales in Schools (FBSS) and Daily Physical Activity (DPA) guidelines in British Columbia, Canada.
Elementary and middle/high school principals completed a survey on the school food and physical activity environment in 2007-08 (N=513) and 2011-12 (N=490). Hierarchical mixed effects regression was used to examine changes in: 1) availability of food and beverages; 2) minutes per day of Physical Education (PE); 3) delivery method of PE; and 4) school community support. Models controlled for school enrollment and community type, education and income.
After policy implementation was expected, more elementary schools provided access to fruits and vegetables and less to 100% fruit juice. Fewer middle/high schools provided access to sugar-sweetened beverages, French fries, baked goods, salty snacks and chocolate/candy. Schools were more likely to meet 150 min/week of PE for grade 6 students, and offer more minutes of PE per week for grade 8 and 10 students including changes to PE delivery method. School community support for nutrition and physical activity policies increased over time.
Positive changes to the school food environment occurred after schools were expected to implement the FBSS and DPA guidelines. Reported changes to the school environment are encouraging and provide support for guidelines and policies that focus on increasing healthy eating and physical activity in schools.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24731514 View in PubMed
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Changing patterns in health behaviors and risk factors related to cardiovascular disease among American Indians and Alaska Natives

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97740
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2010 Apr;100(4):677-683
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Jernigan, VBB
Duran, B
Ahn, D
Winkleby, M
Author Affiliation
Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5411, USA. valariej@stanford.edu
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2010 Apr;100(4):677-683
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control - psychology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
Fruit
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We assessed changes in cardiovascular disease-related health outcomes and risk factors among American Indians and Alaska Natives by age and gender. METHODS: We used cross-sectional data from the 1995 to 1996 and the 2005 to 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. The respondents were 2548 American Indian and Alaska Native women and men aged 18 years or older in 1995-1996 and 11 104 women and men in 2005-2006. We analyzed the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension, cigarette smoking, sedentary behavior, and low vegetable or fruit intake. RESULTS: From 1995-1996 to 2005-2006, the adjusted prevalence of diabetes among American Indians and Alaska Natives increased by 26.9%, from 6.7% to 8.5%, and obesity increased by 25.3%, from 24.9% to 31.2%. Hypertension increased by 5%, from 28.1% to 29.5%. Multiple logistic models showed no meaningful changes in smoking, sedentary behavior, or intake of fruits or vegetables. In 2005-2006, 79% of the population had 1 or more of the 6 risk factors, and 46% had 2 or more. CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes, obesity, and hypertension and their associated risk factors should be studied further among urban, rural, and reservation American Indian and Alaska Native populations, and effective primary and secondary prevention efforts are critical.
PubMed ID
20220114 View in PubMed
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Classifying neighbourhoods by level of access to stores selling fresh fruit and vegetables and groceries: identifying problematic areas in the city of Gatineau, Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114426
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Nov-Dec;103(6):e433-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Adrian C Gould
Philippe Apparicio
Marie-Soleil Cloutier
Author Affiliation
Centre Urbanisation Culture Société, Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Montréal, QC.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Nov-Dec;103(6):e433-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cities
Commerce - statistics & numerical data
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Fruit
Geographic Mapping
Humans
Quebec
Residence Characteristics - classification
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Physical access to stores selling groceries, fresh fruit and vegetables (FV) is essential for urban dwellers. In Canadian cities where low-density development practices are common, social and material deprivation may be compounded by poor geographic access to healthy food. This case study examines access to food stores selling fresh FV in Gatineau, Quebec, to identify areas where poor access is coincident with high deprivation.
Food retailers were identified using two secondary sources and each store was visited to establish the total surface area devoted to the sale of fresh FV. Four population-weighted accessibility measures were then calculated for each dissemination area (DA) using road network distances. A deprivation index was created using variables from the 2006 Statistics Canada census, also at the scale of the DA. Finally, six classes of accessibility to a healthy diet were constructed using a k-means classification procedure. These were mapped and superimposed over high deprivation areas.
Overall, deprivation is positively correlated with better accessibility. However, more than 18,000 residents (7.5% of the population) live in high deprivation areas characterized by large distances to the nearest retail food store (means of 1.4 km or greater) and virtually no access to fresh FV within walking distance (radius of 1 km).
In this research, we identified areas where poor geographic access may introduce an additional constraint for residents already dealing with the challenges of limited financial and social resources. Our results may help guide local food security policies and initiatives.
PubMed ID
23618023 View in PubMed
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Comparison in dietary patterns derived for the Canadian Newfoundland and Labrador population through two time-separated studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273570
Source
Nutr J. 2015;14:75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Zhi Chen
Peizhong Peter Wang
Lian Shi
Yun Zhu
Lin Liu
Zhiwei Gao
Janine Woodrow
Barbara Roebothan
Source
Nutr J. 2015;14:75
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nutrition Assessment
Reproducibility of Results
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
While a dietary pattern is often believed to be stable in a population, there is limited research assessing its stability over time. The objective of this study is to explore and compare major dietary patterns derived for the Canadian subpopulation residing in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), through two time-separated studies using an identical method.
In this study, we derived and compared the major dietary patterns derived from two independent studies in the NL adult population. The first study was based on the healthy controls from a large population-based case-control study (CCS) in 2005. The second was from a food-frequency questionnaire validation project (FFQVP) conducted in 2012. In both studies, participants were recruited in the same manner and dietary information was collected by an identical self-administered food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Exploratory common factor analysis was conducted to identify major dietary patterns. A comparison was conducted between the two study populations.
Four major dietary patterns were identified: Meat, Vegetables/fruits, Fish, and Grains explaining 22%, 20%, 12% and 9% variance respectively, with a total variance of 63%. Three major dietary patterns were derived for the controls of the CCS: Meat, Plant-based diet, and Fish explaining 24%, 20%, and 10% variance respectively, with a total variance of 54%. As the Plant-based diet pattern derived for the CCS was a combination of the Vegetables/fruits and Grains patterns derived for the FFQVP, no considerable difference in dietary patterns was found between the two studies.
A comparison between two time-separated studies suggests that dietary patterns of the NL adult population have remained reasonably stable over almost a decade.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26231925 View in PubMed
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59 records – page 1 of 6.