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Associations between sociocultural home environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5-year olds: BRA-study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291600
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:310-320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-01-2017
Author
Anne Lene Kristiansen
Mona Bjelland
Anne Himberg-Sundet
Nanna Lien
Lene Frost Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, PO Box 1046 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: a.l.kristiansen@medisin.uio.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:310-320
Date
Oct-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - ethnology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Female
Fruit
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Healthy Diet - ethnology
Humans
Male
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Parenting - ethnology
Parents
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Principal Component Analysis
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
The home environment is the first environment to shape childhood dietary habits and food preferences, hence greater understanding of home environmental factors associated with vegetable consumption among young children is needed. The objective has been to examine questionnaire items developed to measure the sociocultural home environment of children focusing on vegetables and to assess the psychometric properties of the resulting factors. Further, to explore associations between the environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5 year olds. Parents (n 633) were invited to participate and filled in a questionnaire assessing the child's vegetable intake and factors potentially influencing this, along with a 24-h recall of their child's fruit and vegetable intake. Children's fruit and vegetable intakes at two meals in one day in the kindergarten were observed by researchers. Principal components analysis was used to examine items assessing the sociocultural home environment. Encouragement items resulted in factors labelled "reactive encouragement", "child involvement" and "reward". Modelling items resulted in the factors labelled "active role model" and "practical role model". Items assessing negative parental attitudes resulted in the factor labelled "negative parental attitudes" and items assessing family pressure/demand resulted in the factor labelled "family demand". The psychometric properties of the factors were for most satisfactory. Linear regression of the associations between vegetable intake and the factors showed, as expected, generally positive associations with "child involvement", "practical role model" and "family demand", and negative associations with "negative parental attitudes" and "reward". Unexpectedly, "reactive encouragement" was negatively associated with vegetable consumption. In conclusion, associations between sociocultural home environmental factors and children's vegetable consumption showed both expected and unexpected associations some of which differed by maternal education - pointing to a need for further comparable studies.
PubMed ID
28676449 View in PubMed
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Changes in 10-12 year old's fruit and vegetable intake in Norway from 2001 to 2008 in relation to gender and socioeconomic status - a comparison of two cross-sectional groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130787
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:108
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Marit Hilsen
Maartje M van Stralen
Knut-Inge Klepp
Elling Bere
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Sport, University of Agder, Norway. marit.hilsen@medisin.uio.no
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:108
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards - trends
Diet Surveys
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Food Supply
Fruit
Humans
Male
Norway
Parents
Sex Factors
Social Class
Vegetables
Abstract
Norwegian children and adolescents eat less than half of the recommended 5 portions of fruit and vegetables (FV) per day. Gender and socioeconomic disparities in FV consumption shows that boys and children of lower socioeconomic status (SES) eat less FV than girls and high SES children. We also know that accessibility and preferences has been identified as two important determinants of FV intake. The objectives of this study were to compare FV intake among Norwegian 6th and 7th graders in 2001 and 2008, to explore potential mediated effects of accessibility and preferences on changes in FV over time, to explore whether these changes in FV intake was moderated by gender and/or SES and whether a moderated effect in FV intake was mediated by accessibility and preferences of FV.
The baseline survey of the Fruits and Vegetables Make the Marks project was conducted in 2001 at 38 randomly chosen schools in two Norwegian counties. A second survey was conducted at the same schools in 2008. A total of 27 schools participated in both surveys (2001 n = 1488, 2008 n = 1339). FV intake was measured by four food frequency questions (times/week) in a questionnaire which the pupils completed at school. SES was based on parents' reports of their own educational level in a separate questionnaire. The main analyses were multilevel linear regression analyses.
A significant year*parental educational level interaction was observed (p = 0.01). FV intake decreased among pupils of parents with lower educational level (13.9 vs. 12.6 times/week in 2001 and 2008, respectively), but increased among pupils of parents with higher education (14.8 vs. 15.0 times/week, respectively). This increasing SES disparity in FV intake was partly mediated by an increasing SES disparity in accessibility and preferences over time, wherein children with higher educated parents had a steeper increase in accessibility and preferences over time than children with lower educated parents. The year*sex interaction was not significant (p = 0.54).
This study shows an increase in SES disparities in 6th and 7th graders FV intake from 2001 to 2008, partly mediated by an increasing SES disparity in accessibility and preferences of FV.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21968008 View in PubMed
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Child consumption of fruit and vegetables: the roles of child cognitions and parental feeding practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130460
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Jun;15(6):1047-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Elisabeth L Melbye
Nina C Øverby
Torvald Øgaard
Author Affiliation
Norwegian School of Hotel Management, University of Stavanger, 4036 Stavanger, Norway. elisabeth.l.melbye@uis.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Jun;15(6):1047-55
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - psychology - standards
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Intention
Norway
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Parents
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Social Environment
Vegetables
Abstract
To examine the roles of child cognitions and parental feeding practices in explaining child intentions and behaviour regarding fruit and vegetable consumption.
Cross-sectional surveys among pre-adolescent children and their parents.
The child questionnaire included measures of fruit and vegetable consumption and cognitions regarding fruit and vegetable consumption as postulated by the Attitude-Social Influence-Self-Efficacy (ASE) model. The parent questionnaire included measures of parental feeding practices derived from the Comprehensive Feeding Practices Questionnaire (CFPQ).
In total, 963 parents and 796 students in grades 5 and 6 from eighteen schools in the south-western part of Norway participated.
A large portion of child intention to eat fruit and child fruit consumption was explained by child cognitions (29 % and 25 %, respectively). This also applied to child intention to eat vegetables and child vegetable consumption (42 % and 27 %, respectively). Parent-reported feeding practices added another 3 % to the variance explained for child intention to eat fruit and 4 % to the variance explained for child vegetable consumption.
The results from the present study supported the application of the ASE model for explaining the variance in child intentions to eat fruit and vegetables and in child consumption of fruit and vegetables. Furthermore, our findings indicated that some parental feeding practices do have an influence on child intentions and behaviour regarding fruit and vegetable consumption. However, the role of parental feeding practices, and the pathways between feeding practices and child eating intentions and behaviour, needs to be further investigated.
PubMed ID
22000074 View in PubMed
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Differences in Danish children's diet quality on weekdays v. weekend days.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124085
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Sep;15(9):1653-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Berit W Rothausen
Jeppe Matthiessen
Camilla Hoppe
Per B Brockhoff
Lene F Andersen
Inge Tetens
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutrition, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, DK-2860 Søborg, Denmark. bewro@food.dtu.dk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Sep;15(9):1653-60
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages
Body mass index
Body Weight
Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Humans
Male
Meals
Motor Activity
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritive Value
Obesity - prevention & control
Overweight - prevention & control
Parents
Regression Analysis
Time Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
To compare differences in children's diet quality on weekdays (Monday-Thursday), Fridays and weekend days.
A representative cross-sectional study in which participants completed a 7 d pre-coded food record. Mean intakes of energy, macronutrients and selected food items (g/10 MJ) as well as energy density were compared between weekdays, Fridays and weekend days for each gender in three age groups (4-6, 7-10 and 11-14 years) using Tobit analysis to account for zero intakes.
The Danish National Survey of Dietary Habits and Physical Activity 2003-2008.
Children (n 784; 49·9 % boys) aged 4-14 years.
For both genders in all age groups (P
PubMed ID
22625874 View in PubMed
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Do descriptive norms related to parents and friends predict fruit and vegetable intake similarly among 11-year-old girls and boys?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271271
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Jan 14;115(1):168-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-2016
Author
Elviira Lehto
Carola Ray
Ari Haukkala
Agneta Yngve
Inga Thorsdottir
Eva Roos
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Jan 14;115(1):168-75
Date
Jan-14-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Child
Diet - standards
Eating
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Friends
Fruit
Humans
Male
Parents
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
We examined whether there are sex differences in children's fruit and vegetable (FV) intake and in descriptive norms (i.e. perceived FV intake) related to parents and friends. We also studied whether friends' impact is as important as that of parents on children's FV intake. Data from the PRO GREENS project in Finland were obtained from 424 children at the age 11 years at baseline. At baseline, 2009 children filled in a questionnaire about descriptive norms conceptualised as perceived FV intake of their parents and friends. They also filled in a validated FFQ that assessed their FV intake both at baseline and in the follow-up in 2010. The associations were examined with multi-level regression analyses with multi-group comparisons. Girls reported higher perceived FV intake of friends and higher own fruit intake at baseline, compared with boys, and higher vegetable intake both at baseline and in the follow-up. Perceived FV intake of parents and friends was positively associated with both girls' and boys' FV intake in both study years. The impact of perceived fruit intake of the mother was stronger among boys. The change in children's FV intake was affected only by perceived FV intake of father and friends. No large sex differences in descriptive norms were found, but the impact of friends on children's FV intake can generally be considered as important as that of parents. Future interventions could benefit from taking into account friends' impact as role models on children's FV intake.
PubMed ID
26450715 View in PubMed
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Evaluating free school fruit: results from a natural experiment in Norway with representative data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259394
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Jun;17(6):1224-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Arnstein Øvrum
Elling Bere
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Jun;17(6):1224-31
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Costs and Cost Analysis
Data Collection
Diet - economics
Diet Surveys
Food Habits
Food Services
Fruit
Health Behavior
Health promotion
Humans
Norway
Parents
Portion Size
Regression Analysis
Schools
Vegetables
Abstract
To assess impacts of the nationwide Norwegian School Fruit Scheme (NSFS) using nationally representative data.
The NSFS is organized such that primary-school children (grades 1-7) are randomly assigned to one of three school fruit arrangements: (i) the child receives one free fruit or vegetable per day; (ii) the child is given the option to subscribe to one fruit or vegetable per day at a subsidized price; and (iii) the child attends a school that has no school fruit arrangement.
Data from an Internet survey are used to compare child and parental fruit and vegetable intakes across the three NSFS groups focusing mainly on groups (i) and (iii). The analysis was conducted using multivariate regression techniques.
Parents of primary-school children (n 1423) who report on behalf of themselves and their children.
Children who receive free school fruit eat on average 0·36 more fruit portions daily - or 25·0 % more fruits - than children who attend schools with no fruit arrangement (P
PubMed ID
24050787 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of an eHealth intervention aiming to promote healthy food habits from infancy -the Norwegian randomized controlled trial Early Food for Future Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302026
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2019 01 03; 16(1):1
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-03-2019
Author
Christine Helle
Elisabet R Hillesund
Andrew K Wills
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604, Kristiansand, Norway. christine.helle@uia.no.
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2019 01 03; 16(1):1
Date
01-03-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anthropometry
Cookbooks as Topic
Counseling
Diet
Eating
Feeding Behavior
Female
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior
Male
Meals
Mothers
Norway
Parents
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Surveys and Questionnaires
Telemedicine
Vegetables
Abstract
Strategies to optimize early-life nutrition provide an important opportunity for primary prevention of childhood obesity. Interventions that can be efficiently scaled-up to the magnitude needed for sustainable childhood obesity prevention are needed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of an eHealth intervention on parental feeding practices and infant eating behaviors.
The Norwegian study Early Food for Future Health is a randomized controlled trial. Parents were recruited via social media and child health clinics during spring 2016 when their child was aged 3 to 5?months. In total 718 parents completed a web-based baseline questionnaire at child age 5.5?months. The intervention group had access to a webpage with monthly short video clips addressing specific infant feeding topics and age-appropriate baby food recipes from child age 6 to 12?months. The control group received routine care. The primary outcomes were child eating behaviors, dietary intake, mealtime routines and maternal feeding practices and feeding styles. The secondary outcomes were child anthropometry. This paper reports outcomes at child age 12?months.
More than 80% of the intervention group reported viewing all/most of the video clips addressing infant feeding topics and indicated that the films were well adapted to the child's age and easy to understand. Children in the intervention group were served vegetables/fruits more frequently (p?=?0.035) and had tasted a wider variety of vegetables (p?=?0.015) compared to controls. They were also more likely to eat family breakfast (p?=?0.035) and dinner (p?=?0.011) and less likely to be playing or watching TV/tablet during meals (p?=?0.009) compared to control-group children. We found no group differences for child anthropometry or maternal feeding practices.
Our findings suggest that the eHealth intervention is an appropriate and feasible tool to propagate information on healthy infant feeding to Norwegian mothers. Our study also suggests that anticipatory guidance on early protective feeding practices by such a tool may increase young children's daily vegetable/fruit intake and promote beneficial mealtime routines.
ISRCTN, ISRCTN13601567. Registered 29 February 2016, http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN13601567.
PubMed ID
30606197 View in PubMed
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The Norwegian School Fruit Programme: evaluating paid vs. no-cost subscriptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29698
Source
Prev Med. 2005 Aug;41(2):463-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Elling Bere
Marit B Veierød
Knut-Inge Klepp
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Box 1046 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway. e.t.bere@medisin.uio.no
Source
Prev Med. 2005 Aug;41(2):463-70
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Consumer Satisfaction
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Food Habits
Food Services - economics
Fruit
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Norway
Parents
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
School Health Services
Statistics, nonparametric
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This study reports the effect of providing Norwegian school children with free fruit or vegetables every school day and the effect of an existing fee-based School Fruit Programme. METHODS: Seventh grade pupils and their parents completed questionnaires at baseline (autumn 2001) and at follow-up (spring 2002). Nine schools participated in the School Fruit Programme for free (Free fruit), nine schools took part at standard conditions (Paid fruit), and 20 schools did not take part in the subscription programme (No fruit). A total of 795 7th graders (11 or 12 years old at baseline) participated both at baseline and at follow-up. RESULTS: At follow-up, pupils attending the Free fruit schools had significantly higher intake of fruit and vegetables at school than the pupils at the Paid fruit and No fruit schools (P
PubMed ID
15917042 View in PubMed
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Obesogenic dietary intake in families with 1-year-old infants at high and low obesity risk based on parental weight status: baseline data from a longitudinal intervention (Early STOPP).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278707
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Mar;55(2):781-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Viktoria Svensson
Tanja Sobko
Anna Ek
Michaela Forssén
Kerstin Ekbom
Elin Johansson
Paulina Nowicka
Maria Westerståhl
Ulf Riserus
Claude Marcus
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Mar;55(2):781-92
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Parents
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Vegetables
Abstract
To compare dietary intake in 1-year-old infants and their parents between families with high and low obesity risk, and to explore associations between infant dietary intake and relative weight.
Baseline analyses of 1-year-old infants (n = 193) and their parents participating in a longitudinal obesity intervention (Early STOPP) were carried out. Dietary intake and diet quality indicators were compared between high- and low-risk families, where obesity risk was based on parental weight status. The odds for high diet quality in relation to parental diet quality were determined. Associations between measured infant relative weight and dietary intake were examined adjusting for obesity risk, socio-demographics, and infant feeding.
Infant dietary intake did not differ between high- and low-risk families. The parents in high-risk families consumed soft drinks, French fries, and low-fat spread more frequently, and fish and fruits less frequently (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
25893717 View in PubMed
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One year of free school fruit in Norway--7 years of follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276351
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2015;12:139
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Elling Bere
Saskia J te Velde
Milada Cvancarova Småstuen
Jos Twisk
Knut-Inge Klepp
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2015;12:139
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior
Costs and Cost Analysis
Diet
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Food Services
Fruit
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Norway
Parents
Program Evaluation
Schools
Snacks
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
It is important that health-promoting efforts result in sustained behavioural changes, preferably throughout life. However, only a very few intervention studies evaluate long term follow up.
The aim of the present study is to evaluate the overall and up to seven years effect of providing daily one piece of fruit or vegetable (FV) for free for one school year.
A total of 38 randomly drawn elementary schools from two counties in Norway participated in the Fruit and Vegetables Make the Marks project. Baseline (2001) and follow-up surveys were conducted in May 2002, 2005 and 2009 (n?=?320 with complete data) to assess FV and unhealthy snack intake. Mixed models were used to analyze the data.
Statistically significant adjusted overall effects of the intervention were revealed for FV intake (1.52 times/day) but this weakened over time. A significant adjusted overall effect (-1.54 consumptions/week) and a significant seven-year-follow-up effect (-2.02 consumptions/week) was found for consumption of unhealthy snacks for pupils of parents without higher education.
One year of free school fruit resulted in higher FV intake and lower unhealthy snack intake, however this weakened over time for FV intake and became stronger for snack intake. More follow-up studies with larger samples and lower attrition rates are needed in order to further evaluate the long-term effect.
Notes
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