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An outbreak of calicivirus associated with consumption of frozen raspberries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199353
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1999 Dec;123(3):469-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
A. Pönkä
L. Maunula
C H von Bonsdorff
O. Lyytikäinen
Author Affiliation
Helsinki City Center of the Environment, Finland.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1999 Dec;123(3):469-74
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caliciviridae - pathogenicity
Caliciviridae Infections - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Contamination
Frozen Foods - virology
Fruit - virology
Gastroenteritis - etiology - virology
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In April 1988, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred among employees in a large company in Helsinki, Finland. A retrospective cohort study, using a self-administered questionnaire, was carried out to ascertain the cause and extent of the outbreak. To meet the case definition, employees had to have had diarrhoea and/or vomiting since 2 April, 1998. A subanalysis was made in the biggest office, consisting of 360 employees, of whom 204 (57%) completed the questionnaire. Of these 108 (53%) met the case definition. Employees who had eaten raspberry dressing were more likely to meet the case definition than those who had not (Attack Rate (AR) 65% versus AR 18% Relative Risk, (RR) 3.7, 95%, Confidence Intervals (CI) 2.0-6.7). Four stool specimens obtained from affected kitchen staff who had all eaten the raspberry dressing and who had all become ill simultaneously with the employees were positive by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for calicivirus. The data suggest that the primary source of the outbreak was imported frozen raspberries contaminated by calicivirus.
PubMed ID
10694159 View in PubMed
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A cohort study on diet and the risk of Parkinson's disease: the role of food groups and diet quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123246
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 28;109(2):329-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-28-2013
Author
K. Sääksjärvi
P. Knekt
A. Lundqvist
S. Männistö
M. Heliövaara
H. Rissanen
R. Järvinen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 28;109(2):329-37
Date
Jan-28-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Food Quality
Fruit
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - adverse effects
Parkinson Disease - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
Previous studies on individual foods and nutrients and Parkinson's disease (PD) risk have been inconsistent. Furthermore, only one study has examined the association between the quality of diet and PD. We investigated the prediction of food groups and diet quality on PD in the Finnish Mobile Clinic Survey (1966-72). The population comprised 4524 individuals, aged 40-79 years and free from PD at baseline. Data collection included health examinations, a questionnaire and a 1-year dietary history interview. A modified Alternate Healthy Eating Index was formed to assess diet quality. Statistical analyses were based on Cox's model. During a 41-year follow-up, eighty-five incident cases of PD occurred. No statistically significant associations were found between PD incidence and most of the food groups examined. A few exceptions were fruits and berries in men and milk in women, which showed positive associations. An inverse association between the intake of meat products and PD was found in women. The diet quality index did not predict PD, the adjusted relative risk between the highest and lowest quartiles being 1.83 (95 % CI 0.65, 5.18) in men and 0.97 (95 % CI 0.38, 2.48) in women. The present study suggests that since most of the single food groups or the quality of diet did not predict PD occurrence, the role of diet is apparently rather modest.
PubMed ID
22716925 View in PubMed
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Daily Sedentary Time and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: The National FINRISK 2002 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273644
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2015 Jul;12(7):904-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Katja Borodulin
Anja Kärki
Tiina Laatikainen
Markku Peltonen
Riitta Luoto
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2015 Jul;12(7):904-8
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cholesterol - blood
Diet
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Smoking - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Daily sitting time may be a risk factor for incident cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, this has not yet been extensively studied. Our aim was to study the association of total sitting time with the risk of CVD.
Participants (n = 4516, free of CVD at baseline) from the National FINRISK 2002 Study were followed for fatal and nonfatal CVD using national registers. Participants underwent a health examination and completed questionnaires, including total daily sitting time.
During a mean follow-up of 8.6 years, 183 incident CVD cases occurred. Sitting on a typical weekday, at baseline, was statistically significantly associated with fatal and nonfatal incident CVD. The hazard ratios (with 95% confidence intervals, CI) for the total amount of sitting were 1.05 (95% CI, 1.00-1.10) in the age and gender adjusted model and 1.06 (95% CI, 1.01-1.11) in the fully adjusted model, including age, gender, employment status, education, BMI, smoking status, leisure time physical activity, use of vegetables and fruit, alcohol use, blood pressure or its medication, and cholesterol or its medication.
Our findings suggest that total amount of daily sitting is a risk factor for incident CVD. More research is needed to understand the etiology of sedentary behavior and CVD.
PubMed ID
25153761 View in PubMed
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Dental erosion and associated factors among factory workers exposed to inorganic acid fumes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227625
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1991;87(3):359-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
M. Tuominen
R. Tuominen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Proc Finn Dent Soc. 1991;87(3):359-64
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acids - adverse effects - analysis
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Beverages
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Humans
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Single-Blind Method
Smoking - epidemiology
Sucrose - administration & dosage
Time Factors
Tooth Erosion - epidemiology
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The occurrence of dental erosion and the relative importance of some related factors were explored in a cross-sectional study, using blind dental examinations. A sample of 186 workers from four factories was drawn. Among the 157 dentate participants 76 were working in departments containing acid fumes and 81 controls had never worked under such conditions. Out of the dentate participants, 20 (12.7% had erosion). Anterior teeth were affected more often than posterior ones. Exposure to acid fumes, increasing age and frequency of intake of fruits increased the probability of dental erosion. It can be concluded that exposure to acid fumes in the work environment is associated with dental erosion especially on anterior teeth.
PubMed ID
1749782 View in PubMed
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Detection of human norovirus from frozen raspberries in a cluster of gastroenteritis outbreaks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146741
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009;14(49)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
L. Maunula
M. Roivainen
M. Keränen
S. Mäkela
K. Söderberg
M. Summa
C H von Bonsdorff
M. Lappalainen
T. Korhonen
M. Kuusi
T. Niskanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Food and Environmental Hygiene, University of Helsinki, Finland. leena.maunula@helsinki.fi
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009;14(49)
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caliciviridae Infections - epidemiology
Cluster analysis
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Freezing
Fruit - microbiology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology
HIV Infections - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Norovirus
Population Surveillance - methods
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
We describe a cluster of norovirus outbreaks affecting about 200 people in Southern Finland in September and October 2009. All outbreaks occurred after consumption of imported raspberries from the same batch intended for the catering sector. Human norovirus genotype GI.4 was found in frozen raspberries. The berries were served in toppings of cakes in separate catering settings or mixed in curd cheese as a snack for children in a daycare center. The relative risk for consumption of the berry dish was 3.0 (p
PubMed ID
20003905 View in PubMed
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Diet and 20-year chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality in middle-aged men from three European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189642
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jul;56(7):638-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
I C Walda
C. Tabak
H A Smit
L. Räsänen
F. Fidanza
A. Menotti
A. Nissinen
E J M Feskens
D. Kromhout
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jul;56(7):638-43
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Diet
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - mortality
Seafood
Smoking
Survival Analysis
Vegetables
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
Abstract
To investigate the relation of baseline antioxidant, fruit, vegetable and fish intake with 20 y chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality in middle-aged men from three European countries.
Prospective study (1970-1990).
Five population-based cohorts of middle-aged men from Finland, Italy and The Netherlands.
A total of 2917 men aged 50-69 y at baseline.
Baseline information on diet was collected using the cross-check dietary history method. After 20 y of follow-up the underlying cause of death of those who died was established centrally. Survival analyses were performed using the Cox Proportional Hazards Model.
After adjustment for age, smoking and country, we observed an inverse trend (P-trend
PubMed ID
12080403 View in PubMed
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Dietary factors protecting women from urinary tract infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61636
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Mar;77(3):600-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Tero Kontiokari
Jaana Laitinen
Leea Järvi
Tytti Pokka
Kaj Sundqvist
Matti Uhari
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Mar;77(3):600-4
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Beverages
Case-Control Studies
Coitus
Confidence Intervals
Diet
Feces - microbiology
Female
Fermentation
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Milk - metabolism - microbiology
Multivariate Analysis
Nutrition Policy
Odds Ratio
Probiotics - administration & dosage
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Because urinary tract infections (UTIs) are caused by bacteria in the stool, dietary factors may affect the risk of contracting a UTI by altering the properties of the fecal bacterial flora. OBJECTIVE: We studied dietary and other risk factors for UTI in fertile women in a case-control setting. DESIGN: One hundred thirty-nine women from a health center for university students or from the staff of a university hospital (mean age: 30.5 y) with a diagnosis of an acute UTI were compared with 185 age-matched women with no episodes of UTIs during the past 5 y. Data on the women's dietary and other lifestyle habits were collected by questionnaire. A risk profile for UTI expressed in the form of adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs was modeled in logistic regression analysis for 107 case-control pairs with all relevant information. RESULTS: Frequent consumption of fresh juices, especially berry juices, and fermented milk products containing probiotic bacteria was associated with a decreased risk of recurrence of UTI: the OR for UTI was 0.66 (95% CI: 0.48, 0.92) per 2 dL juice. A preference for berry juice over other juices gave an OR of 0.28 (95% CI: 0.14, 0.56). Consumption of fermented milk products > or = 3 times/wk gave an OR of 0.21 (95% CI: 0.06, 0.66) relative to consumption or = 3 times/wk compared with
PubMed ID
12600849 View in PubMed
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Dietary flavonoids and the risk of lung cancer and other malignant neoplasms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207880
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Aug 1;146(3):223-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-1997
Author
P. Knekt
R. Järvinen
R. Seppänen
M. Hellövaara
L. Teppo
E. Pukkala
A. Aromaa
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Aug 1;146(3):223-30
Date
Aug-1-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Diet Surveys
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Fruit
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Flavonoids are effective antioxidants and, in theory, may provide protection against cancer, although direct human evidence of this is scarce. The relation between the intake of antioxidant flavonoids and subsequent risk of cancer was studied among 9,959 Finnish men and women aged 15-99 years and initially cancer free. Food consumption was estimated by the dietary history method, covering the total habitual diet during the previous year. During a follow-up in 1967-1991, 997 cancer cases and 151 lung cancer cases were diagnosed. An inverse association was observed between the intake of flavonoids and incidence of all sites of cancer combined. The sex- and age-adjusted relative risk of all sites of cancer combined between the highest and lowest quartiles of flavonoid intake was 0.80 (95% confidence interval 0.67-0.96). This association was mainly a result of lung cancer, which presented a corresponding relative risk of 0.54 (95% confidence interval 0.34-0.87). The association between flavonoid intake and lung cancer incidence was not due to the intake of antioxidant vitamins or other potential confounding factors, as adjustment for factors such as smoking and intakes of energy, vitamin E, vitamin C, and beta-carotene did not materially alter the results. The association was strongest in persons under 50 years of age and in nonsmokers with relative risks of 0.33 (95% confidence interval 0.15-0.77) and 0.13 (95% confidence interval 0.03-0.58), respectively. Of the major dietary flavonoid sources, the consumption of apples showed an inverse association with lung cancer incidence, with a relative risk of 0.42 (95% confidence interval 0.23-0.76) after adjustment for the intake of other fruits and vegetables. The results are in line with the hypothesis that flavonoid intake in some circumstances may be involved in the cancer process, resulting in lowered risks.
PubMed ID
9247006 View in PubMed
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Dietary patterns and their associations with home food availability among Finnish pre-school children: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299379
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1232-1242
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018
Author
Henna Vepsäläinen
Liisa Korkalo
Vera Mikkilä
Reetta Lehto
Carola Ray
Kaija Nissinen
Essi Skaffari
Mikael Fogelholm
Leena Koivusilta
Eva Roos
Maijaliisa Erkkola
Author Affiliation
1Department of Food and Environmental Sciences,University of Helsinki, PO Box 66,FI-00014 University of Helsinki,Helsinki,Finland.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1232-1242
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Fruit
Humans
Vegetables
Abstract
To study the associations between home food availability and dietary patterns among pre-school children.
Cross-sectional study in which parents of the participating children filled in an FFQ and reported how often they had certain foods in their homes. We derived dietary pattern scores using principal component analysis, and composite scores describing the availability of fruits and vegetables as well as sugar-enriched foods in the home were created for each participant. We used multilevel models to investigate the associations between availability and dietary pattern scores.
The DAGIS study, Finland.
The participants were 864 Finnish 3-6-year-old children recruited from sixty-six pre-schools. The analyses included 711 children with sufficient data.
We identified three dietary patterns explaining 16·7 % of the variance. The patterns were named 'sweets-and-treats' (high loadings of e.g. sweet biscuits, chocolate, ice cream), 'health-conscious' (high loadings of e.g. nuts, natural yoghurt, berries) and 'vegetables-and-processed meats' (high loadings of e.g. vegetables, cold cuts, fruit). In multivariate models, the availability of fruits and vegetables was inversely associated with the sweets-and-treats pattern (ß=-0·05, P
PubMed ID
29331168 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.