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Assessing validity of a short food frequency questionnaire on present dietary intake of elderly Icelanders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126210
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Tinna Eysteinsdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali National-University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. tinnaey@landspitali.is
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Cod Liver Oil
Coffee
Dairy Products
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Iceland
Interviews as Topic
Male
Meat
Nutrition Assessment
Questionnaires - standards
Sex Factors
Tea
Vegetables
Abstract
Few studies exist on the validity of food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) administered to elderly people. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of a short FFQ on present dietary intake, developed specially for the AGES-Reykjavik Study, which includes 5,764 elderly individuals. Assessing the validity of FFQs is essential before they are used in studies on diet-related disease risk and health outcomes.
128 healthy elderly participants (74 y ± 5.7; 58.6% female) answered the AGES-FFQ, and subsequently filled out a 3-day weighed food record. Validity of the AGES-FFQ was assessed by comparing its answers to the dietary data obtained from the weighed food records, using Spearman's rank correlation, Chi-Square/Kendall's tau, and a Jonckheere-Terpstra test for trend.
For men a correlation = 0.4 was found for potatoes, fresh fruits, oatmeal/muesli, cakes/cookies, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee, tea and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.40-0.71). A lower, but acceptable, correlation was also found for raw vegetables (r = 0.33). The highest correlation for women was found for consumption of rye bread, oatmeal/muesli, raw vegetables, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee and tea (r = 0.40-0.61). An acceptable correlation was also found for fish topping/salad, fresh fruit, blood/liver sausage, whole-wheat bread, and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.28-0.37). Questions on meat/fish meals, cooked vegetables and soft drinks did not show a significant correlation to the reference method. Pearson Chi-Square and Kendall's tau showed similar results, as did the Jonckheere-Terpstra trend test.
A majority of the questions in the AGES-FFQ had an acceptable correlation and may be used to rank individuals according to their level of intake of several important foods/food groups. The AGES-FFQ on present diet may therefore be used to study the relationship between consumption of several specific foods/food groups and various health-related endpoints gathered in the AGES-Reykjavik Study.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22413931 View in PubMed
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Carotenoid Intake and Serum Concentration in Young Finnish Children and Their Relation with Fruit and Vegetable Consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297466
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Oct 17; 10(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-17-2018
Author
Marianne Prasad
Hanna-Mari Takkinen
Liisa Uusitalo
Heli Tapanainen
Marja-Leena Ovaskainen
Georg Alfthan
Iris Erlund
Suvi Ahonen
Mari Åkerlund
Jorma Toppari
Jorma Ilonen
Mikael Knip
Riitta Veijola
Suvi M Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Unit, Department of Public Health Solutions, The National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, 00271 Helsinki, Finland. marianne.prasad@thl.fi.
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Oct 17; 10(10):
Date
Oct-17-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Biomarkers - blood
Carotenoids - administration & dosage - blood
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Diet Records
Feeding Behavior
Female
Finland
Fruit
Humans
Infant
Male
Vegetables
beta Carotene - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Fruit and vegetable intake has been associated with a reduced risk of many chronic diseases. These foods are the main dietary source of carotenoids. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the associations between dietary intake and serum concentrations of a- and ß-carotene in a sample of young Finnish children from the population-based birth cohort of the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) Study. The current analysis comprised 3-day food records and serum samples from 207 children aged 1, 2 and 3 years. Spearman and partial correlations, as well as a cross-classification analyses, were used to assess the relationship between dietary intake and the corresponding biomarkers. Serum concentrations of a- and ß-carotene were significantly higher among the 1-year-old compared to the 3-year-old children. Dietary intakes of a- and ß-carotene correlated significantly with their respective serum concentrations in all age groups, the association being highest at the age of 1 year (a-carotene r = 0.48; p
PubMed ID
30336644 View in PubMed
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Compliance, tolerability and safety of two antioxidant-rich diets: a randomised controlled trial in male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132562
Source
Br J Nutr. 2011 Aug;106(4):557-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Anette Karlsen
Mette Svendsen
Ingebjørg Seljeflot
Mary-Ann Sommernes
Joseph Sexton
Asgeir Brevik
Iris Erlund
Mauro Serafini
Nasser Bastani
Siv Fagertun Remberg
Grethe I Borge
Monica Hauger Carlsen
Siv Kjølsrud Bøhn
Mari C Myhrstad
Lars O Dragsted
Asim K Duttaroy
Karin Haffner
Petter Laake
Christan A Drevon
Harald Arnesen
Andrew Collins
Serena Tonstad
Rune Blomhoff
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2011 Aug;106(4):557-71
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinidia - adverse effects
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Diet - adverse effects
Diet Records
Fruit - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Oxidative Stress
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Smoking - blood
Abstract
It has been suggested that antioxidants attenuate oxidative stress and prevent oxidative stress-related diseases. Paradoxically, randomised controlled trials (RCT) using pharmacological doses of antioxidant supplements have demonstrated harmful effects in smokers. The aim of the present study was to test the compliance, tolerability and safety of two food-based antioxidant-rich diets in smokers. One of the diets provided antioxidants at levels similar to that used in RCT using supplements which previously have generated harmful effects. The present study followed a randomised, parallel-arm dietary intervention for 8 weeks (n 102) in male smokers (age = 45 years). Participants were randomised to either antioxidant-rich diet, kiwi fruit or control groups. The antioxidant-rich foods provided about 300 mmol antioxidants/week from a wide range of plant-based food items. The kiwi fruit group consumed three kiwi fruits/d. Compliance to both diets was good. Only mild, undesirable events were reported by a minority of the participants. The safety of both diets was demonstrated as no potentially harmful or pro-oxidative effects were observed. In the antioxidant-rich diet group, the mean intake of antioxidants increased from 30 mmol/d at baseline to 62 mmol/d during the intervention. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that male smokers can comply with two food-based antioxidant-rich diets. Furthermore, the present study is the first to demonstrate the tolerability and safety of dietary antioxidants at levels similar to dosages provided in RCT using supplements. Such diets may be useful in future studies investigating whether dietary antioxidants may reduce oxidative stress and related diseases.
PubMed ID
21806852 View in PubMed
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Dietary intake of some important mycotoxins by the Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32069
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2001 Aug;18(8):696-706
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
A. Thuvander
T. Möller
H E Barbieri
A. Jansson
A C Salomonsson
M. Olsen
Author Affiliation
National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden. anth@slv.se
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2001 Aug;18(8):696-706
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aflatoxins
Aged
Cereals - chemistry
Child
Diet Records
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Middle Aged
Nuts - chemistry
Ochratoxins
Patulin
Sweden
Trichothecenes
Abstract
To estimate the intake of some mycotoxins from food in Sweden, approximately 600 samples were collected and analysed for aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, patulin and trichothecenes. Intakes were calculated for average and high consumers among adults and children and compared with the tolerable daily intake (TDI) of the respective toxin. Mycotoxin levels in the food samples were generally below the European/national maximum limits. However, high levels of aflatoxins were found in some samples of Brazil nuts and pistachios. The intake of ochratoxin A, patulin and trichothecenes was found to be below the temporary, TDI values (tTDI) proposed for these toxins by international expert groups, although the intake of trichothecenes (expressed as T-2 toxin equivalents) in children with a high consumption of cereals was close to the tTDI for T-2 toxin. Since there is to date no established numerical tTDI for aflatoxins, such a value was estimated for use within the project. The calculated intake of aflatoxins in high consumers exceeded this tTDI by a factor of two. In conclusion, the exposure to mycotoxins in Sweden did not generally, give rise to any major health concerns in the present study. However, the high levels of aflatoxins in certain commodities emphasize the need for preventive measures and improved control of toxin levels in these food items. Furthermore, the need for regulatory levels for trichothecenes in cereal products should be evaluated.
PubMed ID
11469326 View in PubMed
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Diet cost, diet quality and socio-economic position: how are they related and what contributes to differences in diet costs?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137702
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Sep;14(9):1680-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Petra J Rydén
Linda Hagfors
Author Affiliation
Department of Food and Nutrition, Umeå University, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden. petra.ryden@kost.umu.se
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Sep;14(9):1680-92
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet - economics
Diet Records
Eating
Female
Food - economics
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit - economics
Humans
Male
Nutritional Status
Parents - education
Public Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
To examine diet costs in relation to dietary quality and socio-economic position, and to investigate underlying reasons for differences in diet costs.
Dietary intake was assessed by a 4 d food diary and evaluated using the 2005 Healthy Eating Index (HEI). National consumer food prices collected by Statistics Sweden and from two online stores/supermarkets were used to estimate diet costs.
Sweden.
A nationally representative sample of 2160 children aged 4, 8 or 11 years.
Higher scores on the HEI resulted in higher diet costs and, conversely, higher diet costs were linked to increased total HEI scores. Children who consumed the most healthy and/or expensive diets ate a more energy-dilute and varied diet compared with those who ate the least healthy and/or least expensive diets. They also consumed more fish, ready meals and fruit. Regression analysis also linked increased food costs to these food groups. There was a positive, but weak, relationship between HEI score and diet cost, parental education and parental occupation respectively.
Healthy eating is associated with higher diet cost in Swedish children, in part because of price differences between healthy and less-healthy foods. The cheapest and most unhealthy diets were found among those children whose parents were the least educated and had manual, low-skill occupations. Our results pose several challenges for public health policy makers, as well as for nutrition professionals, when forming dietary strategies and providing advice for macro- and microlevels in society.
PubMed ID
21255480 View in PubMed
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The diet of adolescents can be improved by school intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143191
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jun;13(6A):973-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Ulla Hoppu
Jenni Lehtisalo
Johanna Kujala
Teija Keso
Sini Garam
Heli Tapanainen
Antti Uutela
Tiina Laatikainen
Ulla Rauramo
Pirjo Pietinen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jun;13(6A):973-9
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Diet - standards
Diet Records
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Food Services - standards
Fruit
Health Behavior
Health education
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
School Health Services
Sex Factors
Abstract
To decrease the intake of sucrose, increase the intake of fibre and the consumption of fruit and vegetables among secondary-school pupils.
Intervention study among eighth grade pupils during one school year. Data were collected by questionnaires and from a subgroup of pupils by 48 h dietary recall at baseline in spring 2007 and after the intervention in 2008.
Twelve secondary schools were randomly allocated to intervention (IS) and control schools (CS) within three cities. Intervention included nutrition education and improvement of the food environment focusing particularly on the quality of snacks at school.
A total of 659 pupils completed the questionnaires and the dietary recall was obtained from 287 pupils both at baseline and follow-up.
The frequency of consumption of rye bread increased (P = 0.03) and that of sweets decreased (P = 0.006) among girls in the IS. The intake of sucrose fell among IS pupils, from 12.8 % to 10.5 % of the total energy intake (P = 0.01). Intake of fruit (g/MJ) remained the same in IS, whereas it decreased in CS (P = 0.04).
Sugar intake can be lowered by improving the quality of snacks, but it is more difficult to increase fibre intake and fruit and vegetable consumption unless the content of school lunches can be modified. It is the responsibility of the adults working in schools to create a healthy environment and to make healthy choices easy for pupils.
PubMed ID
20513268 View in PubMed
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The diets of school-aged Aboriginal youths in Canada: a systematic review of the literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269926
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2015 Jun;28(3):246-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
A. Gates
K. Skinner
M. Gates
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2015 Jun;28(3):246-61
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Beverages
Canada
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dairy Products
Diet
Diet Records
Dietary Fiber
Dietary Sucrose
Energy intake
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Memory, Short-Term
Nutrition Assessment
Snacks
Students
Vegetables
Vitamins
Abstract
Most national surveys examining diet leave large segments of the Aboriginal population under-represented. The present study aimed to: (i) review primary research studies that investigated the dietary intakes of Canadian school-aged Aboriginal youths; (ii) summarise the tools and methodologies currently used to measure diet in this population; and (iii) identify knowledge gaps and suggest areas of future research.
A systematic review of research published between January 2004 and January 2014 related to the diets of Canadian school-aged (6-18 years) Aboriginal youths was undertaken, including Medline, Scopus, ERIC, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases. Studies were summarised based on purpose, year, sample population, setting, dietary assessment method and main findings.
Twenty-four studies were reviewed, all of which were cross-sectional in design. Most (n = 16; 67%) were from Ontario or Quebec, investigated the diets of First Nations (n = 21; 88%) youths and took place in remote or isolated settings (n = 18; 75%). Almost all of the studies used the 24-h recall to assess intake (n = 19; 79%), of which 89% used a single recall. The findings suggest that the diets of Aboriginal youths could be improved. Of particular concern are inadequate intakes of vegetables and fruit, milk and alternatives, fibre, folate, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium and vitamin D, concomitant with an excess consumption of sugar sweetened beverages, snacks and fast foods. Traditional foods remain important but tend to be consumed infrequently.
The diets of Canadian Aboriginal youths are energy-dense and nutrient-poor. The diets of Inuit and Métis youths, in particular, and perceptions of a balanced diet warrant further investigation.
PubMed ID
24852456 View in PubMed
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Differences in Danish children's diet quality on weekdays v. weekend days.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124085
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Sep;15(9):1653-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Berit W Rothausen
Jeppe Matthiessen
Camilla Hoppe
Per B Brockhoff
Lene F Andersen
Inge Tetens
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutrition, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, DK-2860 Søborg, Denmark. bewro@food.dtu.dk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Sep;15(9):1653-60
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages
Body mass index
Body Weight
Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Humans
Male
Meals
Motor Activity
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritive Value
Obesity - prevention & control
Overweight - prevention & control
Parents
Regression Analysis
Time Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
To compare differences in children's diet quality on weekdays (Monday-Thursday), Fridays and weekend days.
A representative cross-sectional study in which participants completed a 7 d pre-coded food record. Mean intakes of energy, macronutrients and selected food items (g/10 MJ) as well as energy density were compared between weekdays, Fridays and weekend days for each gender in three age groups (4-6, 7-10 and 11-14 years) using Tobit analysis to account for zero intakes.
The Danish National Survey of Dietary Habits and Physical Activity 2003-2008.
Children (n 784; 49·9 % boys) aged 4-14 years.
For both genders in all age groups (P
PubMed ID
22625874 View in PubMed
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Does tracking of dietary behaviours differ by parental education in children during the transition into adolescence?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121842
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Apr;16(4):673-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Torunn H Totland
Mekdes K Gebremariam
Nanna Lien
Mona Bjelland
May Grydeland
Ingunn H Bergh
Knut-Inge Klepp
Lene F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, PO Box 1046 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway. t.h.totland@medisin.uio.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Apr;16(4):673-82
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Carbonated Beverages - analysis
Child
Cohort Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Internet
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Parents - education
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweetening Agents - administration & dosage
Vegetables
Abstract
The present study investigates the changes and tracking of dietary behaviours in Norwegian 11-year-olds and examines the association between parental education and dietary tracking over a time period of 20 months.
Longitudinal data from the Norwegian HEalth In Adolescents (HEIA) cohort study followed up at three time points (2007-2009).
Intakes of fruits, vegetables and snacks were assessed by frequency and intakes of sugar-sweetened soft drinks and squash were assessed by frequency and amount. Tracking of dietary behaviours was assessed by adolescents' relative position in rank over time and Cohen's kappa was used to measure tracking coefficients. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between parental education and the tracking of dietary behaviours.
In total, 885 adolescents from the HEIA cohort study participated by answering Internet-based questionnaires at three time points.
The results indicated that boys and girls maintained their relative position in rank of dietary intake over time, when grouped by baseline consumption. Fair to moderate tracking coefficients of dietary variables were observed. An inverse association was found between parental education and stability of soft drink and squash consumption during the 20 months.
The observed tracking pattern indicates the importance of promoting healthy dietary behaviours at an even earlier age. Furthermore, interventions should focus particularly on adolescents from families with low parental education and their consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.
PubMed ID
22874120 View in PubMed
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Estimated dietary intake of nitrite and nitrate in Swedish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136225
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 May;28(5):659-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
K. Larsson
P O Darnerud
N-G Ilbäck
L. Merino
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2011 May;28(5):659-66
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinogens - toxicity
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Diet
Diet Records
Female
Food Preservatives - administration & dosage - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Male
Meat Products - analysis
Nitrates - administration & dosage - analysis
Nitrites - administration & dosage - analysis
Nitroso Compounds - toxicity
Nutrition Surveys
Risk assessment
Sweden
Vegetables - chemistry
Water - analysis
Abstract
This study examines the intake of nitrate and nitrite in Swedish children. Daily intake estimates were based on a nationwide food consumption survey (4-day food diary) and nitrite/nitrate content in various foodstuffs. The mean intake of nitrite from cured meat among 2259 children studied was 0.013, 0.010 and 0.007 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) in age groups 4, 8-9 and 11-12 years, respectively. Among these age groups, three individuals (0.1% of the studied children) exceeded the acceptable daily intake (ADI) of 0.07 mg nitrite kg(-1) body weight day(-1). The mean intake of nitrate from vegetables, fruit, cured meat and water was 0.84, 0.68 and 0.45 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for children aged 4, 8-9 and 11-12 years, respectively. No individual exceeded the ADI of 3.7 mg nitrate kg(-1) body weight day(-1). However, when the total nitrite intake was estimated, including an estimated 5% endogenous conversion of nitrate to nitrite, approximately 12% of the 4-year-old children exceeded the nitrite ADI. Thus, the intake of nitrite in Swedish children may be a concern for young age groups when endogenous nitrite conversion is included in the intake estimates.
PubMed ID
21400324 View in PubMed
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32 records – page 1 of 4.