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115 records – page 1 of 12.

An after-school snack of raisins lowers cumulative food intake in young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112735
Source
J Food Sci. 2013 Jun;78 Suppl 1:A5-A10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Barkha P Patel
Nick Bellissimo
Bohdan Luhovyy
Lorianne J Bennett
Evelyn Hurton
James E Painter
G Harvey Anderson
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Food Sci. 2013 Jun;78 Suppl 1:A5-A10
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appetite Depressants - administration & dosage
Appetite Regulation
Child
Child Behavior
Energy intake
Female
Food, Preserved
Fruit
Functional Food
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Nova Scotia
Questionnaires
Satiety Response
Snacks
Vitis
Abstract
Snacks are an important part of children's dietary intake, but the role of dried fruit on energy intake in children is unknown. Therefore, the effect of ad libitum consumption of an after-school snack of raisins, grapes, potato chips, and chocolate chip cookies on appetite and energy intake in twenty-six 8- to 11-y-old normal-weight (15th to 85th percentile) children was examined. On 4 separate weekdays, 1 wk apart, children (11 M, 15 F) were given a standardized breakfast, morning snack (apple), and a standardized lunch. After school, children randomly received 1 of 4 ad libitum snacks and were instructed to eat until "comfortably full." Appetite was measured before and 15, 30, and 45 min after snack consumption. Children consumed the least calories from raisins and grapes and the most from cookies (P
PubMed ID
23789934 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection associated with unpasteurized non-commercial, custom-pressed apple cider--Ontario, 1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201147
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1999 Jul 1;25(13):113-7; discussion 117-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1999

An outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection from unpasteurized commercial apple juice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203050
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1999 Feb 2;130(3):202-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2-1999
Author
S H Cody
M K Glynn
J A Farrar
K L Cairns
P M Griffin
J. Kobayashi
M. Fyfe
R. Hoffman
A S King
J H Lewis
B. Swaminathan
R G Bryant
D J Vugia
Author Affiliation
California Department of Health Services, Berkeley 94704, USA.
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1999 Feb 2;130(3):202-9
Date
Feb-2-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Beverages - adverse effects - microbiology
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Escherichia coli O157
Fruit - adverse effects - microbiology
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Statistics, nonparametric
Sterilization
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections have traditionally been associated with animal products, but outbreaks associated with produce have been reported with increasing frequency. In fall 1996, a small cluster of E. coli O157:H7 infections was epidemiologically linked to a particular brand (brand A) of unpasteurized apple juice.
To define the extent of the outbreak, confirm the source, and determine how the apple juice became contaminated.
Descriptive epidemiologic study and traceback investigation.
Western United States and British Columbia, Canada.
Patients with E. coli O157:H7 infection who were exposed to brand A apple juice.
Clinical outcome and juice exposure histories of case-patients, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of case and juice isolates, and juice production practices.
Seventy persons with E. coli O157:H7 infection and exposure to brand A unpasteurized apple juice were identified. Of these persons, 25 (36%) were hospitalized, 14 (20%) developed the hemolytic uremic syndrome, and 1 (1%) died. Recalled apple juice that was produced on 7 October 1996 grew E. coli O157:H7 with a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern indistinguishable from that of case isolates. Apple juice produced on 7 October 1996 accounted for almost all of the cases, and the source of contamination was suspected to be incoming apples. Three lots of apples could explain contamination of the juice: Two lots originated from an orchard frequented by deer that were subsequently shown to carry E. coli O157:H7, and one lot contained decayed apples that had been waxed.
Standard procedures at a state-of-the-art plant that produced unpasteurized juices were inadequate to eliminate contamination with E. coli O157:H7. This outbreak demonstrated that unpasteurized juices must be considered a potentially hazardous food and led to widespread changes in the fresh juice industry.
PubMed ID
10049198 View in PubMed
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Association between fruit and vegetable consumption in mothers and children in low-income, urban neighborhoods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166274
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2007 Oct;34(5):723-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Marie-Pierre Sylvestre
Jennifer O'Loughlin
Katherine Gray-Donald
James Hanley
Gilles Paradis
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. marie-pierre.sylvestre@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2007 Oct;34(5):723-34
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Continental Population Groups
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mothers
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Vegetables
Abstract
To understand factors influencing fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption in children, the authors studied the association between F&V consumption in mothers and children in a sample of 1,106 boys and girls in Grades 4-6 in 24 elementary schools in low-income, multiethnic neighborhoods in Montreal, Canada. Approximately 10% of girls and 19% of boys reported not having eaten any vegetables in the week prior to questionnaire administration; 53% of girls and 63% of boys did not consume whole fruits daily. Each unit increase in F&V consumption in mothers was associated with a 10% to 20% increase in F&V consumption in children. Interventions to improve F&V consumption should aim to improve awareness among parents of the importance of fruits and vegetables and of the impact of their own behavior on their children's F&V consumption.
PubMed ID
17142242 View in PubMed
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Associations between school meal-induced dietary changes and metabolic syndrome markers in 8-11-year-old Danish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281572
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Aug;55(5):1973-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Camilla T Damsgaard
Christian Ritz
Stine-Mathilde Dalskov
Rikard Landberg
Ken D Stark
Anja Biltoft-Jensen
Inge Tetens
Arne Astrup
Kim F Michaelsen
Lotte Lauritzen
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Aug;55(5):1973-84
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Child
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cluster analysis
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage - analysis
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Fishes
Food Services
Fruit
Healthy Diet
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meals
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood
Schools
Seafood
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides - blood
Vegetables
Waist Circumference
Abstract
We recently showed that provision of Nordic school meals rich in fish, vegetables and potatoes and with reduced intakes of fat improved blood pressure, insulin resistance assessed by the homeostatic model (HOMA-IR), and plasma triacylglycerol despite increasing waist circumference in Danish 8-11-year-olds. This study explored whether intake or biomarkers of key dietary components in the schools meals were associated with these metabolic syndrome (MetS) markers during the 6-month intervention.
Data from 7-day dietary records and measurements of whole-blood docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), blood pressure, fasting blood MetS markers, waist circumference and android/total fat mass assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months from 523 children were analyzed in linear mixed-effects models adjusted for puberty, growth and fasting.
After adjustment for multiple testing, whole-blood DHA was negatively associated with HOMA-IR (P 
PubMed ID
27084093 View in PubMed
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Associations of television viewing, physical activity and dietary behaviours with obesity in aboriginal and non-aboriginal Canadian youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143787
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Sep;13(9):1430-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Carmina Ng
T Kue Young
Paul N Corey
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. carmina.ng@utoronto.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Sep;13(9):1430-7
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise - physiology
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Students - statistics & numerical data
Television - statistics & numerical data
Vegetables
Abstract
To determine associations of diet, physical activity and television (TV) viewing time with obesity among aboriginal and non-aboriginal youth in conjunction with socio-economic variables.
Cross-sectional study of differences between aboriginal and non-aboriginal groups and associations between lifestyle and socio-economic factors with obesity were examined.
Population data from the Canadian Community Health Survey Cycle 2.2 conducted in 2004 in the ten provinces of Canada.
A total of 198 aboriginal and 4448 non-aboriginal Canadian youth aged 12-17 years.
Compared to non-aboriginal youth, physical activity participation among aboriginal youth was higher, but consumption of vegetables and dairy products was lower, and more aboriginal youth were 'high' TV watchers. Low income adequacy was associated with decreased odds for obesity among aboriginal youth in contrast to higher odds among non-aboriginal youth. Non-aboriginal 'high' TV watchers consumed more soft drinks and non-whole-grain products than did 'low' TV watchers. Physical activity participation did not differ between 'high' and 'low' TV watchers for both groups, and was associated with lowered odds for obesity only among aboriginal youth.
Sociodemographic and lifestyle risk factors associated with obesity differ between aboriginal and non-aboriginal youth. These findings may be useful for guiding intervention efforts.
PubMed ID
20441661 View in PubMed
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Beverage consumption of children and teens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152561
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Dec;19(4):17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Didier Garriguet
Author Affiliation
Health Information and Research Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0T6. didier.garriguet@statcan.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2008 Dec;19(4):17-22
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Beverages - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Carbonated Beverages - utilization
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Fruit
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Male
Milk - utilization
Water
Abstract
According to results from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey--Nutrition, children and teens get about one-fifth of their daily calories from beverages. As they get older, boys and girls drink less milk and fruit juice, and more soft drinks and fruit drinks. By ages 14 to 18, boys' average daily consumption of soft drinks matches their consumption of milk, and exceeds their consumption of fruit juice and fruit drinks. Beverage consumption by children and teens varies little by province, except in Newfoundland and Labrador where it tends to be comparatively high, and in British Columbia where it tends to be low.
PubMed ID
19226923 View in PubMed
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Birch pollen-related food hypersensitivity: influence of total and specific IgE levels. A multicenter study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40100
Source
Allergy. 1983 Jul;38(5):353-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983
Author
N E Eriksson
J A Wihl
H. Arrendal
Source
Allergy. 1983 Jul;38(5):353-7
Date
Jul-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibody Specificity
Child
Female
Food Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Fruit - adverse effects
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Nuts - adverse effects
Pollen - immunology
Radioallergosorbent Test
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications - diagnosis - immunology
Skin Tests
Sweden
Trees
Abstract
Total IgE, RAST results with tree pollen allergens, and prick test results with birch, grass and mugwort pollen allergens were correlated to 872 hay fever patients' reported food hypersensitivity (FH). A positive correlation was found between FH and the RAST and prick test results with birch pollen allergen. At each level of birch pollen sensitivity the incidence of FH was lower in patients with high total IgE than in those with lower total IgE. A negative correlation was found between grass pollen allergy and FH in birch pollen allergics. It is suggested that antigens in some foods have a specific ability to bridge anti-birch IgE molecules on mast cells. An explanation of the negative correlation between FH and total IgE and grass pollen allergy could be that a high number of non-birch-specific IgE molecules on the mast cells will reduce the probability that two anti-birch IgE molecules should bind on nearby sites.
PubMed ID
6614407 View in PubMed
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Canadian Total Diet Study in 1998: pesticide levels in foods from Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada, and corresponding dietary intake estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30285
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2004 Mar;21(3):232-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
D F Rawn
X L Cao
J. Doucet
D J Davies
W F Sun
R W Dabeka
W H Newsome
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division (2203D), Bureau of Chemical Safety, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0L2. thea_rawn@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2004 Mar;21(3):232-50
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet Surveys
Female
Fishes
Food Analysis - methods
Food contamination - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Infant
Insecticides - analysis
Male
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Middle Aged
Organophosphorus Compounds
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Vegetables - chemistry
Yukon Territory
Abstract
The Canadian Total Diet Study is a national survey to determine the level of chemical contaminants in the Canadian food supply. Food samples were collected from Whitehorse, Yukon, supermarkets as part of the study in 1998. Whitehorse was chosen as a sampling centre, despite its small population (n = 19,000), to determine if residue levels were different in foods available in northern communities relative to levels observed in previous studies in the more populated south. Foods were prepared as for consumption before pesticide residue analysis. Residue levels observed in most foods were similar to levels observed in samples from previous surveys from southern Canadian cities. Malathion and DDE (1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene), a transformation product of DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl(ethane), were the two most frequently detected compounds (26.4 and 25.8%, respectively). The majority of pesticides, however, had a detection frequency of
PubMed ID
15195471 View in PubMed
Less detail

115 records – page 1 of 12.