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4-Nonylphenol and bisphenol A in Swedish food and exposure in Swedish nursing women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125631
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Irina Gyllenhammar
Anders Glynn
Per Ola Darnerud
Sanna Lignell
Rob van Delft
Marie Aune
Author Affiliation
National Food Agency, P.O. Box 622, 75126 Uppsala, Sweden. irina.gyllenhammar@slv.se
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Benzhydryl Compounds
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Endocrine Disruptors - analysis - blood - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood - metabolism
Female
Food analysis
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Meat - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Phenols - analysis - blood - metabolism
Sweden
Vegetables - chemistry
Young Adult
Abstract
4-Nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) are phenolic substances used in high volumes by the industry. Studies on cells and in experimental animals have shown that both these compounds can be classified as estrogenic hormone disrupters. Information about the exposure of humans to NP and BPA is still scarce, especially regarding levels in human blood. The first aim of this study was to investigate possible sources of NP and BPA exposure from food, by analyzing the levels of NP and BPA from a Swedish food market basket, based on the Swedish per capita food consumption. A second aim was to investigate blood serum levels of NP and BPA, as well as NP-ethoxylates, among young women in Sweden (n=100). Moreover, associations between food consumption and blood NP and BPA levels were studied. In food, NP was to some extent found at levels above limit of quantification (LOQ 20 ng/g fresh weight) in fruits, cereal products, vegetables, and potatoes. BPA levels above LOQ (2 ng/g fresh weight) were found in fish, meats, potatoes, and dairy products. The estimated mean intakes per capita were (medium bound) 27 µg NP/day and 3.9 µg BPA/day, showing that food is a source of BPA and NP in the general Swedish population. In blood serum, free NP above limit of detection (LOD 0.5 ng/g) was detected in 46% of the study participants while detectable levels of total NP (LOD 0.8 ng/g) were observed in 43%. The corresponding percentages for BPA were 25% and 22%, respectively. The results indicate that there is a continuous source of exposure to NP and BPA that is high enough for free NP and BPA to be detected in some consumers. Among the participants with quantifiable levels of free and total NP (n=38), 85% (median, range: 38-112%) of the NP was present as free NP. For BPA 76% (49-109%) was detected as free BPA (n=15). All women had levels of ethoxylates of NP below LOD (0.1-0.7 ng/g). A significantly higher total consumption of fruits and vegetables was reported in questionnaires by participants with NP levels at or above LOD than among women with levels below LOD. This result is supporting the market basket results of relatively high NP levels in these types of food.
PubMed ID
22466019 View in PubMed
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Abscess infections and malnutrition--a cross-sectional study of polydrug addicts in Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262831
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2014 Jun;74(4):322-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Mone Saeland
Margareta Wandel
Thomas Böhmer
Margaretha Haugen
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2014 Jun;74(4):322-8
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abscess - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug users
Female
Fruit
Humans
Hyperhomocysteinemia - epidemiology
Male
Malnutrition - complications - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Thinness
Vegetables
Vitamins - pharmacology
Young Adult
Abstract
Injection drug use and malnutrition are widespread among polydrug addicts in Oslo, Norway, but little is known about the frequency of abscess infections and possible relations to malnutrition.
To assess the prevalence of abscess infections, and differences in nutritional status between drug addicts with or without abscess infections.
A cross-sectional study of 195 polydrug addicts encompassing interview of demographics, dietary recall, anthropometric measurements and biochemical analyses. All respondents were under the influence of illicit drugs and were not participating in any drug treatment or rehabilitation program at the time of investigation.
Abscess infections were reported by 25% of the respondents, 19% of the men and 33% of the women (p = 0.025). Underweight (BMI 15 ?mol/L) was 73% in the abscess-infected group and 41% in the non-abscess-infected group (p = 0.001). The concentrations of S-25-hydroxy-vitamin D3 was very low.
The prevalence of abscess infections was 25% among the examined polydrug addicts. Dietary, anthropometric and biochemical assessment indicated a relation between abscess infections and malnutrition.
PubMed ID
24628456 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the healthy Nordic food index and total and cause-specific mortality among Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268918
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Nina Roswall
Sven Sandin
Marie Löf
Guri Skeie
Anja Olsen
Hans-Olov Adami
Elisabete Weiderpass
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Diet
Edible Grain
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Several healthy dietary patterns have been linked to longevity. Recently, a Nordic dietary pattern was associated with a lower overall mortality. No study has, however, investigated this dietary pattern in relation to cause-specific mortality. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between adherence to a healthy Nordic food index (consisting of wholegrain bread, oatmeal, apples/pears, root vegetables, cabbages and fish/shellfish) and overall mortality, and death by cardiovascular disease, cancer, injuries/suicide and other causes. We conducted a prospective analysis in the Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort, including 44,961 women, aged 29-49 years, who completed a food frequency questionnaire between 1991-1992, and have been followed up for mortality ever since, through Swedish registries. The median follow-up time is 21.3 years, and mortality rate ratios (MRR) were calculated using Cox Proportional Hazards Models. Compared to women with the lowest index score (0-1 points), those with the highest score (4-6 points) had an 18% lower overall mortality (MRR 0.82; 0.71-0.93, p
PubMed ID
25784368 View in PubMed
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An assessment of the barriers to accessing food among food-insecure people in Cobourg, Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133167
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Jun;31(3):121-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
S. Tsang
A M Holt
E. Azevedo
Author Affiliation
Chronic Disease & Injury Prevention Department, Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit, Port Hope, Ontario, Canada. stsang@hkpr.on.ca
Source
Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2011 Jun;31(3):121-8
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Food Services
Food Supply - economics
Fruit - economics - supply & distribution
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Poverty
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Transportation
Vegetables - economics - supply & distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
Low-income people are most vulnerable to food insecurity; many turn to community and/or charitable food programs to receive free or low-cost food. This needs assessment aims to collect information on the barriers to accessing food programs, the opportunities for improving food access, the barriers to eating fresh vegetables and fruit, and the opportunities to increasing their consumption among food-insecure people in Cobourg, Ontario.
We interviewed food program clients using structured individual interviews consisting of mostly opened-ended questions.
Food program clients identified barriers to using food programs as lack of transportation and the food programs having insufficient quantities of food or inconvenient operating hours. They also stated a lack of available vegetables and fruit at home, and income as barriers to eating more vegetables and fruit, but suggested a local fresh fruit and vegetable bulk-buying program called "Good Food Box" and community gardens as opportunities to help increase their vegetable and fruit intake.
Many of the barriers and opportunities identified can be addressed by working with community partners to help low-income individuals become more food secure.
PubMed ID
21733349 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of calicivirus associated with consumption of frozen raspberries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199353
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1999 Dec;123(3):469-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
A. Pönkä
L. Maunula
C H von Bonsdorff
O. Lyytikäinen
Author Affiliation
Helsinki City Center of the Environment, Finland.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1999 Dec;123(3):469-74
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caliciviridae - pathogenicity
Caliciviridae Infections - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Contamination
Frozen Foods - virology
Fruit - virology
Gastroenteritis - etiology - virology
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In April 1988, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred among employees in a large company in Helsinki, Finland. A retrospective cohort study, using a self-administered questionnaire, was carried out to ascertain the cause and extent of the outbreak. To meet the case definition, employees had to have had diarrhoea and/or vomiting since 2 April, 1998. A subanalysis was made in the biggest office, consisting of 360 employees, of whom 204 (57%) completed the questionnaire. Of these 108 (53%) met the case definition. Employees who had eaten raspberry dressing were more likely to meet the case definition than those who had not (Attack Rate (AR) 65% versus AR 18% Relative Risk, (RR) 3.7, 95%, Confidence Intervals (CI) 2.0-6.7). Four stool specimens obtained from affected kitchen staff who had all eaten the raspberry dressing and who had all become ill simultaneously with the employees were positive by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for calicivirus. The data suggest that the primary source of the outbreak was imported frozen raspberries contaminated by calicivirus.
PubMed ID
10694159 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection associated with unpasteurized non-commercial, custom-pressed apple cider--Ontario, 1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201147
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1999 Jul 1;25(13):113-7; discussion 117-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1999

An outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection from unpasteurized commercial apple juice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203050
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1999 Feb 2;130(3):202-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2-1999
Author
S H Cody
M K Glynn
J A Farrar
K L Cairns
P M Griffin
J. Kobayashi
M. Fyfe
R. Hoffman
A S King
J H Lewis
B. Swaminathan
R G Bryant
D J Vugia
Author Affiliation
California Department of Health Services, Berkeley 94704, USA.
Source
Ann Intern Med. 1999 Feb 2;130(3):202-9
Date
Feb-2-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Beverages - adverse effects - microbiology
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Escherichia coli O157
Fruit - adverse effects - microbiology
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Statistics, nonparametric
Sterilization
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections have traditionally been associated with animal products, but outbreaks associated with produce have been reported with increasing frequency. In fall 1996, a small cluster of E. coli O157:H7 infections was epidemiologically linked to a particular brand (brand A) of unpasteurized apple juice.
To define the extent of the outbreak, confirm the source, and determine how the apple juice became contaminated.
Descriptive epidemiologic study and traceback investigation.
Western United States and British Columbia, Canada.
Patients with E. coli O157:H7 infection who were exposed to brand A apple juice.
Clinical outcome and juice exposure histories of case-patients, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of case and juice isolates, and juice production practices.
Seventy persons with E. coli O157:H7 infection and exposure to brand A unpasteurized apple juice were identified. Of these persons, 25 (36%) were hospitalized, 14 (20%) developed the hemolytic uremic syndrome, and 1 (1%) died. Recalled apple juice that was produced on 7 October 1996 grew E. coli O157:H7 with a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern indistinguishable from that of case isolates. Apple juice produced on 7 October 1996 accounted for almost all of the cases, and the source of contamination was suspected to be incoming apples. Three lots of apples could explain contamination of the juice: Two lots originated from an orchard frequented by deer that were subsequently shown to carry E. coli O157:H7, and one lot contained decayed apples that had been waxed.
Standard procedures at a state-of-the-art plant that produced unpasteurized juices were inadequate to eliminate contamination with E. coli O157:H7. This outbreak demonstrated that unpasteurized juices must be considered a potentially hazardous food and led to widespread changes in the fresh juice industry.
PubMed ID
10049198 View in PubMed
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Arctic indigenous women consume greater than acceptable levels of organochlorines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4881
Source
J Nutr. 1995 Oct;125(10):2501-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
H V Kuhnlein
O. Receveur
D C Muir
H M Chan
R. Soueida
Author Affiliation
Centre for Nutrition and the Environment of Indigenous Peoples (CINE), McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec.
Source
J Nutr. 1995 Oct;125(10):2501-10
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Chlorobenzenes - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Comparative Study
Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Dieldrin - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Diet - standards
Environmental Exposure
Ethnic Groups
Female
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Insecticides - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Interviews
Lindane - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Meat - analysis
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Seals, Earless
Toxaphene - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides through traditional food resources was examined for Arctic Indigenous women living in two cultural and environmental areas of the Canadian Arctic--one community representing Baffin Island Inuit in eastern Arctic and two communities representing Sahtú Dene/Métis in western Arctic. Polychlorinated biphenyls, toxaphene, chlorobenzenes, hexachlorocyclohexanes, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, chlordane-related compounds and dieldrin were determined in local food resources as normally prepared and eaten. Quantified dietary recalls taken seasonally reflected normal consumption patterns of these food resources by women in three age groups: 20-40 y, 41-60 y and > or = 61 y. There was wide variation of intake of all organochlorine contaminants in both areas and among age groups for the Sahtú. Fifty percent of the intake recalls collected from the Baffin Inuit exceeded the acceptable daily intake for chlordane-related compounds and toxaphene, and a substantial percentage of the intake records for dieldrin and polychlorinated biphenyls exceeded the acceptable or tolerable daily intake levels. Primary contributing foods to organochlorine contaminants intake for the Baffin Inuit were meat and blubber of ringed seal, blubber of walrus and mattak and blubber of narwal. Important foods contributing organochlorine contaminant to the Sahtú Dene/Métis were caribou, whitefish, inconnu, trout and duck. The superior nutritional benefits and potential health risks of traditional food items are reviewed, as are implications for monitoring organochlorine contaminant contents of food, clinical symptoms and food use.
PubMed ID
7562084 View in PubMed
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Assessment of pesticide exposure control practices among men and women on fruit-growing farms in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159101
Source
J Occup Environ Hyg. 2008 Apr;5(4):217-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Anne-Marie Nicol
Susan M Kennedy
Author Affiliation
Center for Health & Environment Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. anicol@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Occup Environ Hyg. 2008 Apr;5(4):217-26
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agriculture
British Columbia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Female
Fruit
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control
Pesticides
Protective Clothing - utilization
Abstract
Exposure to pesticides can be reduced by wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) or by implementing alternative pest control techniques, such as Integrated Pest Management (IPM). A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted to explore the prevalence of these practices and the factors that may be associated with them among men and women involved in fruit growing in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Survey variables were developed using a framework that incorporated aspects of farm structure, health promotion, and risk perception theories. Three hundred and eighty people took part in the survey (response rate 75%). Of those who applied pesticides (n = 119), 63% indicated that they usually wore PPE during application. Individual equipment use varied. Gloves were worn most frequently (84%), followed by a spray suit (77%) and breathing protection (75%). Peer-related factors and farm-specific characteristics such as the type of crops grown were most strongly associated with PPE use, whereas perception of pesticide risk was only weakly associated with this practice. IPM techniques had been tried on 62% of the conventional farms in the study. A range of factors was significantly associated with the use of IPM, including cultural, attitudinal, experiential, and risk-based and farm-specific variables. These results suggest that decisions to adopt exposure control practices may reflect consideration from the multiple dimensions that make up farm life, including structural characteristics of the farm as well as the attributes of the individuals who live on farms. These findings provide a better understanding of current practices and may help in the development of programs to promote pesticide exposure control practices in the BC farming community.
PubMed ID
18228170 View in PubMed
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Association between fruit and vegetable consumption in mothers and children in low-income, urban neighborhoods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166274
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2007 Oct;34(5):723-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Marie-Pierre Sylvestre
Jennifer O'Loughlin
Katherine Gray-Donald
James Hanley
Gilles Paradis
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. marie-pierre.sylvestre@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2007 Oct;34(5):723-34
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Continental Population Groups
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mothers
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Vegetables
Abstract
To understand factors influencing fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption in children, the authors studied the association between F&V consumption in mothers and children in a sample of 1,106 boys and girls in Grades 4-6 in 24 elementary schools in low-income, multiethnic neighborhoods in Montreal, Canada. Approximately 10% of girls and 19% of boys reported not having eaten any vegetables in the week prior to questionnaire administration; 53% of girls and 63% of boys did not consume whole fruits daily. Each unit increase in F&V consumption in mothers was associated with a 10% to 20% increase in F&V consumption in children. Interventions to improve F&V consumption should aim to improve awareness among parents of the importance of fruits and vegetables and of the impact of their own behavior on their children's F&V consumption.
PubMed ID
17142242 View in PubMed
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228 records – page 1 of 23.