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Abscess infections and malnutrition--a cross-sectional study of polydrug addicts in Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262831
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2014 Jun;74(4):322-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Mone Saeland
Margareta Wandel
Thomas Böhmer
Margaretha Haugen
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2014 Jun;74(4):322-8
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abscess - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug users
Female
Fruit
Humans
Hyperhomocysteinemia - epidemiology
Male
Malnutrition - complications - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Thinness
Vegetables
Vitamins - pharmacology
Young Adult
Abstract
Injection drug use and malnutrition are widespread among polydrug addicts in Oslo, Norway, but little is known about the frequency of abscess infections and possible relations to malnutrition.
To assess the prevalence of abscess infections, and differences in nutritional status between drug addicts with or without abscess infections.
A cross-sectional study of 195 polydrug addicts encompassing interview of demographics, dietary recall, anthropometric measurements and biochemical analyses. All respondents were under the influence of illicit drugs and were not participating in any drug treatment or rehabilitation program at the time of investigation.
Abscess infections were reported by 25% of the respondents, 19% of the men and 33% of the women (p = 0.025). Underweight (BMI 15 ?mol/L) was 73% in the abscess-infected group and 41% in the non-abscess-infected group (p = 0.001). The concentrations of S-25-hydroxy-vitamin D3 was very low.
The prevalence of abscess infections was 25% among the examined polydrug addicts. Dietary, anthropometric and biochemical assessment indicated a relation between abscess infections and malnutrition.
PubMed ID
24628456 View in PubMed
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Changes in predictors and status of homocysteine in young male adults after a dietary intervention with vegetables, fruits and bread.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156896
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2008 Jun;47(4):201-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Tonje Holte Stea
Mohammad Azam Mansoor
Margareta Wandel
Solveig Uglem
Wenche Frølich
Author Affiliation
Norwegian School of Hotel Management, University of Stavanger, 4036 Stavanger, Norway. tonje.h.stea@uis.no
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2008 Jun;47(4):201-9
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bread
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Fruit
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Hyperhomocysteinemia - blood - diet therapy
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Riboflavin - administration & dosage - blood
Treatment Outcome
Vegetables
Vitamin B 12 - administration & dosage - blood
Vitamin B Complex - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Elevated plasma total homocysteine (p-tHcy) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and an inverse association has been shown between the dietary intake of B-vitamins, B-vitamin profile and the concentration of p-tHcy.
The main objective of this investigation was to study the effect of a dietary intervention focusing on an increased intake of vegetables, fruits and bread. The effect of the dietary intervention was determined by the changes in plasma concentrations of tHcy, cysteine (cys), riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and serum concentrations of folate and vitamin B(12).
An intervention study with duration of 5 months, including 541 male recruits from the Norwegian National Guard, Vaernes and a control group, including 209 male recruits from the Norwegian Army, Heggelia.
The dietary intervention resulted in decreased concentration of p-tHcy (-10%, P = 0.002), p-cys (-6%, P
PubMed ID
18521531 View in PubMed
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Effect of a nutrition intervention on intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread among low and high consumers in the Norwegian National Guard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275465
Source
Mil Med. 2014 Sep;179(9):1013-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Solveig Uglem
Marte K Råberg Kjøllesdal
Wenche Frølich
Margareta Wandel
Source
Mil Med. 2014 Sep;179(9):1013-20
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread
Energy intake
Fruit
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Norway
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Young Adult
Abstract
Nutritional information seldom reaches individuals with the most unhealthful dietary habits.
To explore whether an intervention focusing on a combination of nutritional information and increased availability of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread was effective to raise the intake, and knowledge, of these foods among recruits in the military with low as well as high baseline intake.
Intervention study, including 479 recruits, in intervention and control military camps. The participants were divided into three groups (low, medium, and high) according to their baseline intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread.
Those with low/medium baseline intake in the intervention camp had a significant increase in the intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread at follow-up. All three intake groups in the intervention camp also had significantly higher intake of these foods compared to those in the control camp at follow-up. The knowledge scores increased significantly among both high and low consumers in the intervention camp, but not in the control camp.
The intervention led to increased intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread among those recruits in the intervention camp, who were most in need to change their diet.
PubMed ID
25181720 View in PubMed
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Meal types as sources for intakes of fruits, vegetables, fish and whole grains among Norwegian adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271371
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Aug;18(11):2011-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Jannicke B Myhre
Elin B Løken
Margareta Wandel
Lene F Andersen
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Aug;18(11):2011-21
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Breakfast
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Humans
Lunch
Male
Meals
Middle Aged
Norway
Seafood
Snacks
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Young Adult
Abstract
To study how different meals contribute to intakes of fruits, vegetables, fish and whole grains in a group of Norwegian adults and in subgroups of this population. Moreover, to investigate the consequences of skipping the meal contributing most to the intake of each food group (main contributing meal).
Cross-sectional dietary survey in Norwegian adults. Dietary data were collected using two non-consecutive telephone-administered 24 h recalls. The recorded meal types were breakfast, lunch, dinner, supper/evening meal and snacks.
Nationwide, Norway (2010-2011).
Adults aged 18-70 years (n 1787).
Dinner was the main contributing meal for fish and vegetables, while snacks were the main contributing meal for fruit intake. For whole grains, breakfast was the main contributing meal. The main contributing meal did not change for any of the food groups when studying subgroups of the participants according to intake of each food group, educational level or age. A substantially lower intake of the food groups in question was found on days when the main contributing meal was skipped.
Intakes of fruits, vegetables, fish and whole grains largely depend on one meal type. Inclusion of these foods in other meals in addition to the main contributing meal, preferably replacing energy-dense nutrient-poor foods, should be promoted.
PubMed ID
25384694 View in PubMed
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