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Consumption of sugar and sugar-sweetened foods and the risk of pancreatic cancer in a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79900
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Nov;84(5):1171-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Bergkvist Leif
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Nov;84(5):1171-6
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carbonated Beverages
Cohort Studies
Diet
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Fruit
Humans
Hyperglycemia - complications
Hyperinsulinism - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence indicates that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia may be implicated in the development of pancreatic cancer. Frequent consumption of sugar and high-sugar foods may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer by inducing frequent postprandial hyperglycemia, increasing insulin demand, and decreasing insulin sensitivity. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to examine prospectively the association of the consumption of added sugar (ie, sugar added to coffee, tea, cereals, etc) and of high-sugar foods with the risk of pancreatic cancer in a population-based cohort study of Swedish women and men. DESIGN: A food-frequency questionnaire was completed in 1997 by 77 797 women and men aged 45-83 y who had no previous diagnosis of cancer or history of diabetes. The participants were followed through June 2005. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 7.2 y, we identified 131 incident cases of pancreatic cancer. The consumption of added sugar, soft drinks, and sweetened fruit soups or stewed fruit was positively associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer. The multivariate hazard ratios for the highest compared with the lowest consumption categories were 1.69 (95% CI: 0.99, 2.89; P for trend = 0.06) for sugar, 1.93 (1.18, 3.14; P for trend = 0.02) for soft drinks, and 1.51 (0.97, 2.36; P for trend = 0.05) for sweetened fruit soups or stewed fruit. CONCLUSION: High consumption of sugar and high-sugar foods may be associated with a greater risk of pancreatic cancer.
PubMed ID
17093171 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable consumption and incidence of gastric cancer: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80250
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Oct;15(10):1998-2001
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Bergkvist Leif
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, P.O. Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Oct;15(10):1998-2001
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diet Records
Eating
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Whether fruit and vegetable consumption may confer protection from gastric cancer remains controversial. METHODS: We prospectively investigated the association between consumption of fruits and vegetables and the incidence of gastric cancer among participants from two population-based cohort studies: 36,664 women in the Swedish Mammography Cohort and 45,338 men in the Cohort of Swedish Men. Participants completed a food-frequency questionnaire in 1997 and were followed up for cancer incidence through June 2005. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 7.2 years, we ascertained 139 incident cases of gastric cancer. Vegetable consumption was inversely associated with risk of gastric cancer, whereas no significant association was observed for fruit consumption. After controlling for age and other risk factors, women and men who consumed > or =2.5 servings/d of vegetables had a HR of 0.56 (95% CI, 0.34-0.93) for developing gastric cancer compared with those who consumed or =3 servings/wk with
PubMed ID
17035412 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of bladder cancer: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92177
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Sep;17(9):2519-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Andersson Swen-Olof
Johansson Jan-Erik
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Sep;17(9):2519-22
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Fruit and vegetable consumption has been inconsistently associated with risk of bladder cancer. We used data from a prospective population-based cohort study of 82,002 Swedish women and men to examine the association between fruit and vegetable consumption and bladder cancer incidence. Diet was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. During a mean follow-up of 9.4 years, 485 incident cases of bladder cancer were identified in the Swedish cancer registries. We found no statistically significant association between intakes of total fruits and vegetables, total fruits, or total vegetables and bladder cancer risk after adjustment for age, sex, education, and cigarette smoking. The multivariate rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) comparing the highest with the lowest quartile of intake were 0.80 (0.60-1.05) for total fruits and vegetables, 0.93 (0.69-1.25) for fruits, and 0.89 (0.67-1.19) for vegetables. Likewise, no associations were observed for citrus fruits, cruciferous vegetables, or green leafy vegetables. The associations did not differ by sex or smoking status. In conclusion, findings from this prospective study suggest that fruit and vegetable intakes are not likely to be appreciably associated with the risk of bladder cancer.
PubMed ID
18768526 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer risk: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82746
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Feb;15(2):301-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Håkansson Niclas
Näslund Ingmar
Bergkvist Leif
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Feb;15(2):301-5
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brassica
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
High consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a lower risk of pancreatic cancer in many case-control studies. However, cohort studies on this relationship are limited and do not support an association. We examined the associations of overall consumption of fruits and vegetables and consumption of certain subgroups of fruits and vegetables with the incidence of pancreatic cancer among 81,922 women and men in the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. During an average follow-up of 6.8 years (1998-2004), 135 incident pancreatic cancer cases were diagnosed. After adjustment for age and other risk factors for pancreatic cancer, the HRs for the highest compared with the lowest category of intake were 1.13 (95% CI, 0.66-1.94) for total fruits and vegetables, 1.10 (95% CI, 0.64-1.88) for total fruits, and 1.08 (95% CI, 0.63-1.85) for total vegetables. Among specific subgroups of fruits and vegetables, a nonsignificant inverse association was observed with cruciferous vegetable consumption (> or = 3 servings/wk versus or = 1 serving/wk versus never consumption: HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.39-0.99). Findings from this prospective study do not support a relationship of overall fruit and vegetable consumption with pancreatic cancer risk. The association between consumption of cruciferous vegetables and pancreatic cancer risk warrants further investigation.
PubMed ID
16492919 View in PubMed
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