Skip header and navigation

Refine By

9 records – page 1 of 1.

Adherence to a Healthy Nordic Diet and Risk of Stroke: A Danish Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282576
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):259-264
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Kim Overvad
Cecilie Kyrø
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Søren Paaske Johnsen
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):259-264
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Healthy Diet - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries - epidemiology
Stroke - diet therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Abstract
Specific dietary patterns, including the Mediterranean diet, have been associated with stroke prevention. Our aim was to investigate whether adherence to a healthy Nordic diet, including fish, apples and pears, cabbages, root vegetables, rye bread, and oatmeal, was associated with risk of stroke.
Incident cases of stroke among 55?338 men and women from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort were identified from the Danish National Patient Register and verified by review of records. Cases of ischemic stroke were further subclassified based on etiology according to the TOAST classification system (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment). Information on diet was collected at baseline (1993-1997) using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazards ratios of total stroke and subtypes of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.
During a median follow-up of 13.5 years, 2283 cases of incident stroke were verified, including 1879 ischemic strokes. Adherence to a healthy Nordic diet, as reflected by a higher Healthy Nordic Food Index score, was associated with a lower risk of stroke. The hazards ratio comparing an index score of 4 to 6 (high adherence) with an index score of 0 to 1 (low adherence) was 0.86 (95% confidence interval 0.76-0.98) for total stroke. Inverse associations were observed for ischemic stroke, including large-artery atherosclerosis. No trend was observed for hemorrhagic stroke; however, a statistically insignificant trend was observed for intracerebral hemorrhage.
Our findings suggest that a healthy Nordic diet may be recommended for the prevention of stroke.
PubMed ID
28049735 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index is associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer in women: the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121827
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2013
Author
Cecilie Kyrø
Guri Skeie
Steffen Loft
Kim Overvad
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Date
Mar-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Avena sativa
Brassica
Bread
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Norway
Pyrus
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Secale cereale
Vegetables
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a multi-factorial disease in which diet is believed to play a role. Little is known about the health effects of specific regional diets. The Nordic diet is high in fat and sugar but also includes a range of traditional products with anticipated health-promoting effects. The aim of this cohort study was to determine whether a healthy Nordic food index consisting of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables was related to CRC incidence. Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, of whom 1025 developed CRC (13 years' follow-up). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % CI were calculated from Cox proportional hazard models. Women who strongly adhered to a healthy Nordic food index had a 35 % lower incidence of CRC than women with poor adherence (adjusted IRR, 0·65; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·94); a similar tendency was found for men. Women had a 9 % lower incidence of CRC per point adherence to the healthy Nordic food index, but no significant effect was found for men. A regional diet based on healthy Nordic food items was therefore associated with a lower incidence of CRC in women. The protective effect was of the same magnitude as previously found for the Mediterranean diet, suggesting that healthy regional diets should be promoted in order to ensure health; this will also preserve cultural heredity and the environment.
Notes
Erratum In: Br J Nutr. 2014 Feb;111(4):758-9
PubMed ID
22874538 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between adherence to the Danish Food-Based Dietary Guidelines and cardiometabolic risk factors in a Danish adult population: the DIPI study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299378
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 03; 119(6):664-673
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Johanne L Arentoft
Camilla Hoppe
Elisabeth W Andersen
Kim Overvad
Inge Tetens
Author Affiliation
1Division of Diet, Disease Prevention and Toxicology,National Food Institute,Technical University of Denmark,2800 Kgs. Lyngby,Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 03; 119(6):664-673
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Sugars - administration & dosage
Exercise
Fatty Acids - administration & dosage
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Quality
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Metabolic Syndrome - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Single-Blind Method
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Waist Circumference
Whole Grains
Abstract
Diet is recognised as one modifiable lifestyle factor for ischaemic heart disease (IHD). We aimed at investigating the associations between adherence to the Danish Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG) indicated by a Dietary Quality Index (DQI) and selected cardiometabolic risk factors in a cross-sectional study with 219 Danish adult participants (59 %women; age 31-65years) with a minimum of one self-rated risk marker of IHD. Information regarding diet was obtained using web-based dietary assessment software and adherence to the Danish FBDG was expressed by a DQI calculated from 5 food and nutrient indicators (whole grain, fish, fruit and vegetables, energy from saturated fat and from added sugar). Background information, blood samples and anthropometrics were collected and blood pressure was measured. Linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between DQI and cardiometabolic risk factors. DQI was inversely associated with LDL:HDL ratio and TAG (-0·089 per unit; 95 % CI -0·177, -0·002 and -5 % per unit; 95 % CI -9, 0, respectively) and positively associated with HDL-cholesterol (0·047 mmol/l per unit; 95 % CI 0·007, 0·088). For men, DQI was inversely associated with BMI (-3 %per unit; 95 % CI -5, -1), trunk fat (-1 % per unit; 95 % CI -2, -1), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (-30 % per unit; 95 % CI -41, -16 %), HbA1c (-0·09 % per unit; 95 % CI -0·14, -0·04), insulin (-13 % per unit; 95 % CI -19, -7) and homoeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (-14 % per unit; 95 % CI -21, -7). In women, DQI was positively associated with systolic blood pressure (2·6 mmHg per unit; 95 % CI 0·6, 4·6). In conclusion, higher adherence to the current Danish FBDG was associated with a more beneficial cardiometabolic risk profile in a Danish adult population with a minimum of one self-rated risk factor for IHD.
PubMed ID
29352831 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does insufficient adjustment for smoking explain the preventive effects of fruit and vegetables on lung cancer?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17658
Source
Lung Cancer. 2004 Jul;45(1):1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Halla Skuladottir
Anne Tjoenneland
Kim Overvad
Connie Stripp
Jane Christensen
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Jørgen H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. halla@cancer.dk
Source
Lung Cancer. 2004 Jul;45(1):1-10
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
Smoking - adverse effects
Vegetables
Abstract
Recent reports have raised the question, whether the previously observed protective effects of high intake of fruit and vegetables on the risk of lung cancer were due to insufficient adjustment for smoking leading to residual confounding. Association of intake of fruit and vegetables on lung cancer risk was examined, using the Danish prospective cohort study, "Diet, Cancer and Health". Participants completed a food-frequency and lifestyle questionnaire, and age-standardized incidence rates and rate ratios were estimated for quartiles of dietary exposure. In 1993-2001, 247 out of the 54158 participants were diagnosed with lung cancer. The incidence rate of lung cancer was highest in the lowest quartile of intake of plant food (fruit, vegetables, legumes and potatoes) and the age-standardized rate ratio of lung cancer decreased significantly with increasing intake of plant food to 0.35 (95% CI, 0.27-0.45) but after control for smoking it was attenuated to 0.65 (95% CI, 0.45-0.93). The incidence rate differences of current smokers with high (> or = 400 g per day) and low (
PubMed ID
15196728 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food composition of the diet in relation to changes in waist circumference adjusted for body mass index.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131961
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(8):e23384
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Dora Romaguera
Lars Ã?ngquist
Huaidong Du
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Nita G Forouhi
Jytte Halkjær
Edith J M Feskens
Daphne L van der A
Giovanna Masala
Annika Steffen
Domenico Palli
Nicholas J Wareham
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Heiner Boeing
Elio Riboli
Thorkild I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, United Kingdom. d.romaguera-bosch@imperial.ac.uk
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(8):e23384
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - metabolism
Adiposity - physiology
Adult
Aged
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Dairy Products
Denmark
Diet
Female
Food
Fruit
Germany
Glycemic Index
Great Britain
Humans
Italy
Linear Models
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Waist Circumference - physiology
Abstract
Dietary factors such as low energy density and low glycemic index were associated with a lower gain in abdominal adiposity. A better understanding of which food groups/items contribute to these associations is necessary.
To ascertain the association of food groups/items consumption on prospective annual changes in "waist circumference for a given BMI" (WC(BMI)), a proxy for abdominal adiposity.
We analyzed data from 48,631 men and women from 5 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Anthropometric measurements were obtained at baseline and after a median follow-up time of 5.5 years. WC(BMI) was defined as the residuals of waist circumference regressed on BMI, and annual change in WC(BMI) (?WC(BMI), cm/y) was defined as the difference between residuals at follow-up and baseline, divided by follow-up time. The association between food groups/items and ?WC(BMI) was modelled using centre-specific adjusted linear regression, and random-effects meta-analyses to obtain pooled estimates.
Higher fruit and dairy products consumption was associated with a lower gain in WC(BMI) whereas the consumption of white bread, processed meat, margarine, and soft drinks was positively associated with ?WC(BMI). When these six food groups/items were analyzed in combination using a summary score, those in the highest quartile of the score--indicating a more favourable dietary pattern--showed a ?WC(BMI) of -0.11 (95% CI -0.09 to -0.14) cm/y compared to those in the lowest quartile.
A dietary pattern high in fruit and dairy and low in white bread, processed meat, margarine, and soft drinks may help to prevent abdominal fat accumulation.
Notes
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Jul;29(7):778-8415917857
Cites: J Nutr. 2005 Sep;135(9):2263-7016140909
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2005 Dec;28(12):2823-3116306540
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Feb;83(2):284-9016469985
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Sep;61(9):1037-5617375121
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2008 Apr 14;168(7):713-2018413553
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jul;16(7):1693-718451775
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Nov;88(5):1248-5518996859
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Nov 13;359(20):2105-2019005195
Cites: PLoS One. 2009;4(4):e533919396357
Cites: J Nutr. 2009 Oct;139(10):1950-519726588
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Nov;33(11):1280-819704411
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Dec;90(6):1632-4119828709
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Feb;91(2):329-3620016015
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jun;13(6):797-80519772691
Cites: PLoS One. 2010;5(7):e1158820644647
Cites: PLoS One. 2010;5(9). pii: e13097. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.001309720927346
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Nov;92(5):1017-2220810979
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Nov;92(5):1165-7120881074
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010 Nov;18(11):2101-420203630
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Dec;92(6):1429-3521097651
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2011 Jan;34(1):55-720843978
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Jan;24(1):60-910702752
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 Jan 4;344(1):3-1011136953
Cites: J Hum Hypertens. 2001 May;15(5):307-1211378832
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2001 Jul;74(1):80-911451721
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 Apr;75(4):683-811916754
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1113-2412639222
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1147-6212639224
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jun;77(6):1417-2512791618
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2003 Jun;6(4):407-1312795830
Cites: Obes Res. 2003 Jul;11(7):895-90312855760
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1997 Apr 17;336(16):1117-249099655
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1997;26 Suppl 1:S15-259126530
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1998 Jun;27(3):422-309698130
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2004 Oct;92(4):735-4815522143
PubMed ID
21858094 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of acute coronary syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99436
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul;104(2):248-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Louise Hansen
Lars O Dragsted
Anja Olsen
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Erik B Schmidt
Kim Overvad
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. louhan@cancer.dk
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul;104(2):248-55
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Prospective epidemiological studies have reported that a higher fruit and vegetable intake is associated with a lower risk of CHD. The aim of the present study was to examine associations between fruit and vegetable consumption, in particular the subgroupings citrus fruits, apples and cruciferous vegetables, and the risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). During a median follow-up of 7.7 years, 1075 incident ACS cases were identified among 53 383 men and women, aged 50-64 years at recruitment into the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study in 1993-7. Fruit and vegetable intake was estimated from a validated FFQ, and ACS incidence rate ratios (IRR) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Overall, a tendency towards a lower risk of ACS was observed for both men and women with higher fruit and vegetable consumption. For men, we found an inverse association for apple intake (IRR per 25 g/d: 0.97; 95 % CI 0.94, 0.99). This association was also seen among women, albeit borderline significant. However, a higher risk was seen among women with higher fruit juice intake (IRR per 25 g/d: 1.04; 95 % CI 1.00, 1.08). The present results provide some support for previously observed inverse associations between fresh fruit intake, particularly apples, and ACS risk.
PubMed ID
20178672 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intake of dietary fiber, especially from cereal foods, is associated with lower incidence of colon cancer in the HELGA cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131882
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):469-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2012
Author
Louise Hansen
Guri Skeie
Rikard Landberg
Eiliv Lund
Richard Palmqvist
Ingegerd Johansson
Lars O Dragsted
Rikke Egeberg
Nina F Johnsen
Jane Christensen
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark. louhan@cancer.dk
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):469-78
Date
Jul-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cereals
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Eating
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
The role of dietary fiber on the risk of colon and rectal cancer has been investigated in numerous studies, but findings have been inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between intake of dietary fiber and risk of incident colon (including distal and proximal colon) and rectal cancer in the prospective Scandinavian HELGA cohort and to determine if fiber source (vegetables, fruits, potatoes, cereals) impacted the association. We included 1,168 incident cases (691 colon, 477 rectal cancer), diagnosed during a median of 11.3 years, among 108,081 cohort members. Sex-specific incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of colon and rectal cancer were related to intake of total or specific fiber source using Cox proportional hazards models. For men, an inverse association was observed between intake of total fiber and the risk of colon cancer per an incremental increase of 10 g day(-1) , IRR (95% CI): 0.74 (0.64-0.86). Intake of cereal fiber per 2 g day(-1) was associated with an IRR of 0.94 (0.91-0.98), which was also seen for intake of cereal fiber from foods with high fiber content (= 5 g per 100 g product), where the IRR per 2 g day(-1) was 0.94 (0.90-0.98). In women, intake of cereal fiber per 2 g day(-1) was also associated with lower risk of colon cancer, 0.97 (0.93-1.00). No clear associations were seen for rectal cancer. Our data indicate a protective role of total and cereal fiber intake, particularly from cereal foods with high fiber content, in the prevention of colon cancer.
PubMed ID
21866547 View in PubMed
Less detail

Intake of fruit and vegetables and the risk of ischemic stroke in a cohort of Danish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18362
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jul;78(1):57-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
Søren P Johnsen
Kim Overvad
Connie Stripp
Anne Tjønneland
Steen E Husted
Henrik T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital and Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. spj@soci.au.dk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jul;78(1):57-64
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Ischemia - complications
Cerebrovascular Accident - etiology - prevention & control
Citrus
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies have suggested that a high dietary intake of fruit and vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of ischemic stroke. The magnitude of the effect is uncertain, and only one study reported data on the intake of specific fruit and vegetables and the risk of stroke. OBJECTIVE: We examined whether the intake of fruit and vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of ischemic stroke, with particular attention paid to specific fruit and vegetables and subtypes of ischemic stroke. DESIGN: In a prospective cohort study of 54,506 men and women who were included in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health study from 1993 to 1997, estimated total intakes of fruit and vegetables (in g/d) were extracted from a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire completed at baseline. Data about subjects hospitalized with ischemic stroke were obtained from the Danish National Registry of Patients and were verified later by record reviews. The follow-up for ischemic stroke ended on the date of a first hospital admission for stroke or transient ischemic attack, the date of death or emigration, or the end of the study, whichever came first. RESULTS: We identified 266 cases of ischemic stroke involving hospitalization during 168,388 person-years of follow-up (median follow-up: 3.09 y; range: 0.02-5.10 y). After adjustment for potential confounders, persons in the top quintile of fruit and vegetable intake (median: 673 g/d) had a risk ratio of ischemic stroke of 0.72 (95% CI: 0.47, 1.12) relative to persons in the bottom quintile of intake (median: 147 g/d) (P for trend = 0.04). When comparing the top quintile with the bottom quintile, an inverse association was most evident for fruit intake (risk ratio: 0.60; 95% CI: 0.38, 0.95; P for trend = 0.02). Similar risk estimates were seen for most types of fruit and vegetables, although the risks were significant only for citrus fruit. CONCLUSION: An increased intake of fruit may reduce the risk of ischemic stroke.
PubMed ID
12816771 View in PubMed
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.