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Diet and lifestyle factors associated with fish consumption in men and women: a study of whether gender differences can result in gender-specific confounding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118430
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:101
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Maria Wennberg
Andreas Tornevi
Ingegerd Johansson
Agneta Hörnell
Margareta Norberg
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå 901 87, Sweden. maria.wennberg@envmed.umu.se
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:101
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Animals
Chickens
Diet
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Vegetables
Abstract
Fish consumption and intake of omega-3 fatty acids from fish are associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, a prospective study from northern Sweden showed that high consumption of fish is associated with an increased risk of stroke in men, but not in women. The current study aimed to determine if fish consumption is differently related to lifestyle in men compared with women in northern Sweden.
Lifestyle information on 32,782 men and 34,866 women (aged 30-60 years) was collected between 1992 and 2006 within the Västerbotten Intervention Programme (a health intervention in northern Sweden). Spearman correlations coefficients (Rs) were calculated between self-reported consumption of fish and other food items. Lifestyle variables were compared between fish consumption categories.
Fish consumption was positively associated with other foods considered healthy (e.g., root vegetables, lettuce/cabbage/spinach/broccoli, chicken, and berries; Rs = 0.21-0.30), as well as with other healthy lifestyle factors (e.g., exercise and not smoking) and a higher educational level, in both men and women. The only gender difference found, concerned the association between fish consumption and alcohol consumption. Men who were high consumers of fish had a higher intake of all types of alcohol compared with low to moderate fish consumers. For women, this was true only for wine.
Except for alcohol, the association between fish consumption and healthy lifestyle did not differ between men and women in northern Sweden. It is important to adjust for other lifestyle variables and socioeconomic variables in studies concerning the effect of fish consumption on disease outcome.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23210480 View in PubMed
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Dietary intake, leisure time activities and obesity among adolescents in Western Sweden: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277155
Source
Nutr J. 2016 Apr 21;15:41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-21-2016
Author
Anna Winkvist
Bodil Hultén
Jeong-Lim Kim
Ingegerd Johansson
Kjell Torén
Jonas Brisman
Heléne Bertéus Forslund
Source
Nutr J. 2016 Apr 21;15:41
Date
Apr-21-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fast Foods
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Male
Motor Activity
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Prevalence
Public Health
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Overweight and obesity among adolescents are increasing worldwide. Risk factors include dietary intake characteristics and high levels of physical inactivity. In Sweden, few large comprehensive population-based surveys of dietary intake and lifestyle among adolescents have been carried out. Thus, the purpose of the current study was to describe dietary intake and food choices as well as leisure time activities in relation to overweight and obesity in a total sample of all schoolchildren aged 15 years in Western Sweden.
In 2008, a questionnaire was sent to all 21,651 adolescents born in 1992 in Västra Götaland Region, Sweden. Participation rate was 54.3 % (50.7 % girls/49.3 % boys). The questionnaire included a 73-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and questions on lifestyle. Results were evaluated against the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations and Swedish indicators of healthy diet and exercise habits. Associations with concurrent overweight and obesity were evaluated in multiple linear regression analysis.
Among girls, 49.5 % reached the goal of consuming fruit and vegetables at least daily, whereas for boys the figure was 34.4 %. Among both sexes, 15 % reached the goal of consuming fish at least twice weekly. Two-thirds of both sexes reached the goal of regular moderate or vigorous physical activity weekly. In total, 12.4 % were overweight and 2.4 % were obese. More girls than boys were underweight, whereas more boys than girls were overweight or obese (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
27103118 View in PubMed
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Exploring dietary patterns, obesity and sources of bias: the Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121825
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Apr;16(4):631-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Maria Nyholm
Lauren Lissner
Agneta Hörnell
Ingegerd Johansson
Göran Hallmans
Lars Weinehall
Anna Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine/Public Health Epidemiology, University of Gothenburg, BOX 454, SE-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden. maria.nyholm@vgregion.se
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 Apr;16(4):631-8
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bias (epidemiology)
Body Composition
Body mass index
Cluster analysis
Diet
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Intervention Studies
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Vegetables
Abstract
Dietary patterns capture the overall diet and thereby provide information on how nutrients are consumed in combinations, and have been suggested to be a better method than studying single nutrients. The present study explored the relationship between dietary patterns at baseline and incidence of obesity at 10-year follow-up in women.
A longitudinal study using baseline measurements from 1992-1996, including food intake, medication, heredity, socio-economic status, lifestyle and measured body composition, and follow-up data collected in 2002-2006 including measured body composition.
Data from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) in Sweden.
A total of 6545 initially non-obese women aged 30-50 years.
Among women reporting plausible energy intakes, the 'Fruit and vegetables cluster' predicted the highest incidence of obesity (OR = 1·76, 95 % CI 1·11, 2·76; P = 0·015) compared with women in the other food pattern groups combined. When adjusting for metabolic factors and BMI at baseline, the risk for obesity in the 'Fruit and vegetables cluster' was attenuated to non-significance. In contrast, high intake of fruit per se was associated with a decreased risk of developing obesity (OR = 0·69, 95 % CI 0·51, 0·91; P = 0·010).
Dietary pattern groups identified by cluster analysis are likely to reflect characteristics in addition to diet, including lifestyle, previous and current health status and risk factors for future disease, whereas intake of fruit per se was a stable indicator and less affected by baseline characteristics. These results underscore the need for complementary methods in understanding diet-disease relationships.
PubMed ID
22874584 View in PubMed
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Intake of dietary fiber, especially from cereal foods, is associated with lower incidence of colon cancer in the HELGA cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131882
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):469-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2012
Author
Louise Hansen
Guri Skeie
Rikard Landberg
Eiliv Lund
Richard Palmqvist
Ingegerd Johansson
Lars O Dragsted
Rikke Egeberg
Nina F Johnsen
Jane Christensen
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark. louhan@cancer.dk
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):469-78
Date
Jul-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cereals
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Eating
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
The role of dietary fiber on the risk of colon and rectal cancer has been investigated in numerous studies, but findings have been inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between intake of dietary fiber and risk of incident colon (including distal and proximal colon) and rectal cancer in the prospective Scandinavian HELGA cohort and to determine if fiber source (vegetables, fruits, potatoes, cereals) impacted the association. We included 1,168 incident cases (691 colon, 477 rectal cancer), diagnosed during a median of 11.3 years, among 108,081 cohort members. Sex-specific incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of colon and rectal cancer were related to intake of total or specific fiber source using Cox proportional hazards models. For men, an inverse association was observed between intake of total fiber and the risk of colon cancer per an incremental increase of 10 g day(-1) , IRR (95% CI): 0.74 (0.64-0.86). Intake of cereal fiber per 2 g day(-1) was associated with an IRR of 0.94 (0.91-0.98), which was also seen for intake of cereal fiber from foods with high fiber content (= 5 g per 100 g product), where the IRR per 2 g day(-1) was 0.94 (0.90-0.98). In women, intake of cereal fiber per 2 g day(-1) was also associated with lower risk of colon cancer, 0.97 (0.93-1.00). No clear associations were seen for rectal cancer. Our data indicate a protective role of total and cereal fiber intake, particularly from cereal foods with high fiber content, in the prevention of colon cancer.
PubMed ID
21866547 View in PubMed
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Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and genetic predisposition to obesity in 2 Swedish cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283252
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Sep;104(3):809-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Louise Brunkwall
Yan Chen
George Hindy
Gull Rukh
Ulrika Ericson
Inês Barroso
Ingegerd Johansson
Paul W Franks
Marju Orho-Melander
Frida Renström
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Sep;104(3):809-15
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - adverse effects
Body mass index
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Records
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Fruit and Vegetable Juices - adverse effects
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Loci
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrigenomics - methods
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - genetics
Overweight - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prospective Studies
Self Report
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), which has increased substantially during the last decades, has been associated with obesity and weight gain.
Common genetic susceptibility to obesity has been shown to modify the association between SSB intake and obesity risk in 3 prospective cohorts from the United States. We aimed to replicate these findings in 2 large Swedish cohorts.
Data were available for 21,824 healthy participants from the Malmö Diet and Cancer study and 4902 healthy participants from the Gene-Lifestyle Interactions and Complex Traits Involved in Elevated Disease Risk Study. Self-reported SSB intake was categorized into 4 levels (seldom, low, medium, and high). Unweighted and weighted genetic risk scores (GRSs) were constructed based on 30 body mass index [(BMI) in kg/m(2)]-associated loci, and effect modification was assessed in linear regression equations by modeling the product and marginal effects of the GRS and SSB intake adjusted for age-, sex-, and cohort-specific covariates, with BMI as the outcome. In a secondary analysis, models were additionally adjusted for putative confounders (total energy intake, alcohol consumption, smoking status, and physical activity).
In an inverse variance-weighted fixed-effects meta-analysis, each SSB intake category increment was associated with a 0.18 higher BMI (SE = 0.02; P = 1.7 × 10(-20); n = 26,726). In the fully adjusted model, a nominal significant interaction between SSB intake category and the unweighted GRS was observed (P-interaction = 0.03). Comparing the participants within the top and bottom quartiles of the GRS to each increment in SSB intake was associated with 0.24 (SE = 0.04; P = 2.9 × 10(-8); n = 6766) and 0.15 (SE = 0.04; P = 1.3 × 10(-4); n = 6835) higher BMIs, respectively.
The interaction observed in the Swedish cohorts is similar in magnitude to the previous analysis in US cohorts and indicates that the relation of SSB intake and BMI is stronger in people genetically predisposed to obesity.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27465381 View in PubMed
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