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Assessing validity of a short food frequency questionnaire on present dietary intake of elderly Icelanders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126210
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Tinna Eysteinsdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali National-University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. tinnaey@landspitali.is
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Cod Liver Oil
Coffee
Dairy Products
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Iceland
Interviews as Topic
Male
Meat
Nutrition Assessment
Questionnaires - standards
Sex Factors
Tea
Vegetables
Abstract
Few studies exist on the validity of food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) administered to elderly people. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of a short FFQ on present dietary intake, developed specially for the AGES-Reykjavik Study, which includes 5,764 elderly individuals. Assessing the validity of FFQs is essential before they are used in studies on diet-related disease risk and health outcomes.
128 healthy elderly participants (74 y ± 5.7; 58.6% female) answered the AGES-FFQ, and subsequently filled out a 3-day weighed food record. Validity of the AGES-FFQ was assessed by comparing its answers to the dietary data obtained from the weighed food records, using Spearman's rank correlation, Chi-Square/Kendall's tau, and a Jonckheere-Terpstra test for trend.
For men a correlation = 0.4 was found for potatoes, fresh fruits, oatmeal/muesli, cakes/cookies, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee, tea and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.40-0.71). A lower, but acceptable, correlation was also found for raw vegetables (r = 0.33). The highest correlation for women was found for consumption of rye bread, oatmeal/muesli, raw vegetables, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee and tea (r = 0.40-0.61). An acceptable correlation was also found for fish topping/salad, fresh fruit, blood/liver sausage, whole-wheat bread, and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.28-0.37). Questions on meat/fish meals, cooked vegetables and soft drinks did not show a significant correlation to the reference method. Pearson Chi-Square and Kendall's tau showed similar results, as did the Jonckheere-Terpstra trend test.
A majority of the questions in the AGES-FFQ had an acceptable correlation and may be used to rank individuals according to their level of intake of several important foods/food groups. The AGES-FFQ on present diet may therefore be used to study the relationship between consumption of several specific foods/food groups and various health-related endpoints gathered in the AGES-Reykjavik Study.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22413931 View in PubMed
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Changes in 10-12 year old's fruit and vegetable intake in Norway from 2001 to 2008 in relation to gender and socioeconomic status - a comparison of two cross-sectional groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130787
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:108
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Marit Hilsen
Maartje M van Stralen
Knut-Inge Klepp
Elling Bere
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Sport, University of Agder, Norway. marit.hilsen@medisin.uio.no
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:108
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards - trends
Diet Surveys
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Food Supply
Fruit
Humans
Male
Norway
Parents
Sex Factors
Social Class
Vegetables
Abstract
Norwegian children and adolescents eat less than half of the recommended 5 portions of fruit and vegetables (FV) per day. Gender and socioeconomic disparities in FV consumption shows that boys and children of lower socioeconomic status (SES) eat less FV than girls and high SES children. We also know that accessibility and preferences has been identified as two important determinants of FV intake. The objectives of this study were to compare FV intake among Norwegian 6th and 7th graders in 2001 and 2008, to explore potential mediated effects of accessibility and preferences on changes in FV over time, to explore whether these changes in FV intake was moderated by gender and/or SES and whether a moderated effect in FV intake was mediated by accessibility and preferences of FV.
The baseline survey of the Fruits and Vegetables Make the Marks project was conducted in 2001 at 38 randomly chosen schools in two Norwegian counties. A second survey was conducted at the same schools in 2008. A total of 27 schools participated in both surveys (2001 n = 1488, 2008 n = 1339). FV intake was measured by four food frequency questions (times/week) in a questionnaire which the pupils completed at school. SES was based on parents' reports of their own educational level in a separate questionnaire. The main analyses were multilevel linear regression analyses.
A significant year*parental educational level interaction was observed (p = 0.01). FV intake decreased among pupils of parents with lower educational level (13.9 vs. 12.6 times/week in 2001 and 2008, respectively), but increased among pupils of parents with higher education (14.8 vs. 15.0 times/week, respectively). This increasing SES disparity in FV intake was partly mediated by an increasing SES disparity in accessibility and preferences over time, wherein children with higher educated parents had a steeper increase in accessibility and preferences over time than children with lower educated parents. The year*sex interaction was not significant (p = 0.54).
This study shows an increase in SES disparities in 6th and 7th graders FV intake from 2001 to 2008, partly mediated by an increasing SES disparity in accessibility and preferences of FV.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21968008 View in PubMed
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Changes in beverage consumption from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy in the Norwegian Fit for Delivery study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270544
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 May;18(7):1187-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elling Bere
Linda R Sagedal
Ingvild Vistad
Nina C Øverby
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 May;18(7):1187-96
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Animals
Beverages - adverse effects
Coffee - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Educational Status
Female
Fruit and Vegetable Juices
Humans
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Milk
Non-Nutritive Sweeteners - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Norway
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe changes in consumption of different types of beverages from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy, and to examine associations with maternal age, educational level and BMI.
Cross-sectional design. Participants answered an FFQ at inclusion into a randomized controlled trial, the Fit for Delivery (FFD) trial, in median gestational week 15 (range: 9-20), reporting current consumption and in retrospect how often they drank the different beverages pre-pregnancy.
Eight local antenatal clinics in southern Norway from September 2009 to February 2013.
Five hundred and seventy-five healthy pregnant nulliparous women.
Pre-pregnancy, 27 % reported drinking alcohol at least once weekly, compared with none in early pregnancy (P
PubMed ID
25221910 View in PubMed
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Changes in beverage consumption in Norwegian children from 2001 to 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132271
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Mar;15(3):379-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Tonje H Stea
Nina C Øverby
Knut-Inge Klepp
Elling Bere
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604 Kristiansand, Norway. tonje.h.stea@uia.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Mar;15(3):379-85
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages - utilization
Carbonated Beverages
Child
Child Behavior
Diet - trends
Diet Surveys
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Female
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sweetening Agents
Abstract
To analyse (i) differences in beverage pattern among Norwegian children in 2001 and 2008; (ii) beverage intake related to gender, parental education and family composition; and (iii) potential disparities in time trends among the different groups.
Within the Fruits and Vegetables Make the Marks (FVMM) project, 6th and 7th grade pupils filled in a questionnaire about frequency of beverage intake (times/week) in 2001 and 2008.
Twenty-seven elementary schools in two Norwegian counties.
In 2001 a total of 1488 and in 2008 1339 pupils participated.
Between 2001 and 2008, a decreased consumption frequency of juice (from 3·6 to 3·4 times/week, P = 0·012), lemonade (from 4·8 to 2·5 times/week, P
PubMed ID
21835086 View in PubMed
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Changes in fruit and vegetable consumption habits from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy among Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289259
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 04 04; 17(1):107
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-04-2017
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elling Bere
Linda R Sagedal
Ingvild Vistad
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sports and Nutrition, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604, Kristiansand, Norway. marianne.skreden@uia.no.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 04 04; 17(1):107
Date
04-04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - methods
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Fruit and Vegetable Juices
Habits
Humans
Incidence
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Education as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy outcome
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Single-Blind Method
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Women's health
Young Adult
Abstract
A healthy diet is important for pregnancy outcome and the current and future health of woman and child. The aims of the study were to explore the changes from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy in consumption of fruits and vegetables (FV), and to describe associations with maternal educational level, body mass index (BMI) and age.
Healthy nulliparous women were included in the Norwegian Fit for Delivery (NFFD) trial from September 2009 to February 2013, recruited from eight antenatal clinics in southern Norway. At inclusion, in median gestational week 15 (range 9-20), 575 participants answered a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) where they reported consumption of FV, both current intake and recollection of pre-pregnancy intake. Data were analysed using a linear mixed model.
The percentage of women consuming FV daily or more frequently in the following categories increased from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy: vegetables on sandwiches (13 vs. 17%, p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
28376732 View in PubMed
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Changes in meal pattern among Norwegian children from 2001 to 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137847
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Sep;14(9):1549-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Nina Øverby
Tonje H Stea
Frøydis N Vik
Knut-Inge Klepp
Elling Bere
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604 Kristiansand, Norway. nina.c.overby@uia.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Sep;14(9):1549-54
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Diet
Eating
Energy intake
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Norway
Parents - education
Questionnaires
Single-Parent Family
Vegetables
Abstract
The present study aimed to analyse changes in meal pattern among Norwegian children from 2001 to 2008 in general; to analyse associations between meal pattern and gender, parental educational level and number of parents in the household; and to analyse the association between intake of unhealthy snacks, meal pattern and the mentioned variables.
Within the Fruits and Vegetables Make the Marks (FVMM) project, two cross-sectional studies were conducted, one in 2001 and one in 2008, where participants from the same schools filled in a questionnaire on meals eaten the previous day.
Participants were 6th and 7th grade pupils, n 1488 in 2001 and n 1339 in 2008.
Twenty-seven elementary schools in two Norwegian counties.
There were no significant changes in children's meal pattern from 2001 to 2008. For both years more than 90 % of the participants reported that they had breakfast yesterday, while 95 % had lunch, 94 % had dinner and 82 % had supper. More girls than boys reported that they had lunch yesterday (96 % v. 94 %, P = 0·03). More children with higher v. lower educated parents reported that they had breakfast yesterday (93 % v. 88 %, P
PubMed ID
21241534 View in PubMed
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Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and artificially sweetened beverages from childhood to adulthood in relation to socioeconomic status - 15 years follow-up in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296670
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2018 01 17; 15(1):8
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-17-2018
Author
Kathrine Bolt-Evensen
Frøydis N Vik
Tonje Holte Stea
Knut-Inge Klepp
Elling Bere
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, PO. Box 422, 4604, Kristiansand, Norway.
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2018 01 17; 15(1):8
Date
01-17-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Beverages - analysis
Child
Cohort Studies
Diet
Dietary Sugars - administration & dosage
Feeding Behavior
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Humans
Male
Non-Nutritive Sweeteners - administration & dosage
Norway
Schools
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Sugars - administration & dosage
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweetening Agents - administration & dosage
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
In Norway, social inequalities in health and health-related behaviors have been reported despite the well-developed welfare state. The objective of the present study was to analyze; (i) the development in frequency of consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and artificially sweetened beverages (ASB) from childhood to adulthood; (ii) socioeconomic inequalities in the consumption of SSB and ASB using different indicators of socioeconomic status (SES); (iii) time trends in potential disparities in SSB and ASB consumption among different socioeconomic groups to assess the development in socioeconomic inequality from childhood to adulthood.
This study uses data from the Fruits and Vegetables Make the Marks (FVMM) longitudinal cohort, including participants (n?=?437) from 20 random schools from two Norwegian counties. Data from the first survey in 2001 (mean age 11.8) and follow-up surveys in 2005 (mean age 15.5) and 2016 (mean age 26.5) were used. Consumption of SSB and ASB were measured using a food frequency questionnaire, which the participants completed at school in 2001 and 2005, and online in 2016. Various indicators of SES were included; in 2001, parental education and income were measured, in 2005, participants' educational intentions in adolescence were measured, and in 2016, participants' own education and income were measured. The main analyses conducted were linear mixed effects analysis of the repeated measures.
Between 2001 and 2016, a decrease in frequency of consumption of SSB (2.8 v 1.3 times/week; p?=?
PubMed ID
29343247 View in PubMed
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Consumption of vegetables at dinner in a cohort of Norwegian adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159009
Source
Appetite. 2008 Jul;51(1):90-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Kristine Vejrup
Nanna Lien
Knut-Inge Klepp
Elling Bere
Author Affiliation
University of Oslo, Department of Nutrition, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Appetite. 2008 Jul;51(1):90-6
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - physiology
Cohort Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Food Supply
Fruit
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Social Class
Vegetables
Abstract
This longitudinal study examined the frequency of consumption of vegetables for dinner by Norwegian adolescents and their parents. Associations of perceived availability, correlations and stability were explored. The longitudinal cohort consist of 1950 adolescents attending 6th/7th (2002) and 9th/10th (2005) grade, and their parents (n=1647). Only 40% of the adolescents and 60% of the adults reported to have eaten vegetables for dinner yesterday, the reported frequency of vegetables for dinner were 3.7 and 4.1 times/week in 2002 and 2005, respectively, and 4.8 times/week for parents. Girls ate more than boys, and high SES adolescents ate more than low SES adolescents. There were significant differences between adolescent and parent report of both frequency of consumption and perceived availability of vegetables for dinner. Adolescent's frequency of consumption of vegetables was related to the parent's consumption, and the adolescent response from 2002 to 2005 showed strong correlations. There were good tracking in the frequency of consumption of vegetables for dinner, and 25% of the adolescents showed a stable high frequency. To conclude, few adolescents and their parents consumed vegetables for dinner. Interventions are needed to meet the recommendations, and parents should be targeted in intervention programs.
PubMed ID
18243413 View in PubMed
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Correlates of fruit and vegetable intake among Norwegian schoolchildren: parental and self-reports.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30032
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2004 Dec;7(8):991-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Elling Bere
Knut-Inge Klepp
Author Affiliation
Institute for Nutrition Research, University of Oslo, Box 1046 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway. elling.bere@basalmed.uio.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2004 Dec;7(8):991-8
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Nutrition
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Preferences - psychology
Fruit
Humans
Male
Norway
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Disclosure
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To identify correlates of 6th and 7th graders' (age 10-12 years) fruit and vegetable intake, to investigate parent-child correlations of fruit and vegetable intake, and to compare parents' and children's reports of children's accessibility, skills and preferences with respect to fruit and vegetables. DESIGN: The results presented are based on the baseline survey of the 'Fruits and Vegetables Make the Marks Project', where 38 schools participated. SETTING: Fruit and vegetable intake was measured by food frequency questions. Theoretical factors, based on Social Cognitive Theory, potentially correlated to intake were measured, including behavioural skills, accessibility, modelling, intention, preferences, self-efficacy and awareness of 5-a-day recommendations. SUBJECTS: In total, 1950 (participation rate 85%) 6th and 7th graders and 1647 of their parents participated. RESULTS: Overall, 34% of the variance in the pupils' reported fruit and vegetable intake was explained by the measured factors. The strongest correlates to fruit and vegetable intake were preferences and accessibility. The correlation between the children's and their parents' fruit and vegetable intake was 0.23. The parents perceived their children's accessibility to be better than what was reported by the children (P
PubMed ID
15548337 View in PubMed
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[Diet of six-year-old Icelandic children - National dietary survey 2011-2012].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117006
Source
Laeknabladid. 2013 Jan;99(1):17-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Hafdis Helgadottir
Birna Thorisdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Iceland. ingigun@hi.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2013 Jan;99(1):17-23
Date
Jan-2013
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child
Child Behavior
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Dairy Products
Diet
Dietary Fats
Dietary Fiber
Dietary Sucrose
Energy intake
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Iceland
Minerals
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Seafood
Vegetables
Vitamins
Abstract
Knowledge of dietary habits makes the basis for public nutrition policy. The aim of this study was to assess dietary intake of Icelandic six-year-olds.
Subjects were randomly selected six-year-old children (n=162). Dietary intake was assessed by three-day-weighed food records. Food and nutrient intake was compared with the Icelandic food based dietary guidelines (FBDG) and recommended intake of vitamins and minerals.
Fruit and vegetable intake was on average 275±164 g/d, and less than 20% of the subjects consumed =400 g/day. Fish and cod liver oil intake was in line with the FBDG among approximately 25% of subjects. Most subjects (87%) consumed at least two portions of dairy products daily. Food with relatively low nutrient density (cakes, cookies, sugar sweetened drinks, sweets and ice-cream) provided up to 25% of total energy intake. The contribution of saturated fatty acids to total energy intake was 14.1%. Less than 20% of the children consumed dietary fibers in line with recommendations, and for saturated fat and salt only 5% consumed less than the recommended upper limits. Average intake of most vitamins and minerals, apart from vitamin-D, was higher than the recommended intake.
Although the vitamin and mineral density of the diet seems adequate, with the exception of vitamin-D, the contribution of low energy density food to total energy intake is high. Intake of vegetables, fruits, fish and cod liver oil is not in line with public recommendations. Strategies aiming at improving diet of young children are needed.
PubMed ID
23341402 View in PubMed
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