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Associations between school meal-induced dietary changes and metabolic syndrome markers in 8-11-year-old Danish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281572
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Aug;55(5):1973-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Camilla T Damsgaard
Christian Ritz
Stine-Mathilde Dalskov
Rikard Landberg
Ken D Stark
Anja Biltoft-Jensen
Inge Tetens
Arne Astrup
Kim F Michaelsen
Lotte Lauritzen
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Aug;55(5):1973-84
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Child
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cluster analysis
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage - analysis
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Fishes
Food Services
Fruit
Healthy Diet
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meals
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood
Schools
Seafood
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides - blood
Vegetables
Waist Circumference
Abstract
We recently showed that provision of Nordic school meals rich in fish, vegetables and potatoes and with reduced intakes of fat improved blood pressure, insulin resistance assessed by the homeostatic model (HOMA-IR), and plasma triacylglycerol despite increasing waist circumference in Danish 8-11-year-olds. This study explored whether intake or biomarkers of key dietary components in the schools meals were associated with these metabolic syndrome (MetS) markers during the 6-month intervention.
Data from 7-day dietary records and measurements of whole-blood docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), blood pressure, fasting blood MetS markers, waist circumference and android/total fat mass assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months from 523 children were analyzed in linear mixed-effects models adjusted for puberty, growth and fasting.
After adjustment for multiple testing, whole-blood DHA was negatively associated with HOMA-IR (P 
PubMed ID
27084093 View in PubMed
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