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Adherence to the healthy Nordic food index and total and cause-specific mortality among Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268918
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Nina Roswall
Sven Sandin
Marie Löf
Guri Skeie
Anja Olsen
Hans-Olov Adami
Elisabete Weiderpass
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Diet
Edible Grain
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Several healthy dietary patterns have been linked to longevity. Recently, a Nordic dietary pattern was associated with a lower overall mortality. No study has, however, investigated this dietary pattern in relation to cause-specific mortality. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between adherence to a healthy Nordic food index (consisting of wholegrain bread, oatmeal, apples/pears, root vegetables, cabbages and fish/shellfish) and overall mortality, and death by cardiovascular disease, cancer, injuries/suicide and other causes. We conducted a prospective analysis in the Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort, including 44,961 women, aged 29-49 years, who completed a food frequency questionnaire between 1991-1992, and have been followed up for mortality ever since, through Swedish registries. The median follow-up time is 21.3 years, and mortality rate ratios (MRR) were calculated using Cox Proportional Hazards Models. Compared to women with the lowest index score (0-1 points), those with the highest score (4-6 points) had an 18% lower overall mortality (MRR 0.82; 0.71-0.93, p
PubMed ID
25784368 View in PubMed
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Consumption of berries, fruits and vegetables and mortality among 10,000 Norwegian men followed for four decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270548
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2015 Jun;54(4):599-608
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Anette Hjartåker
Markus Dines Knudsen
Steinar Tretli
Elisabete Weiderpass
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2015 Jun;54(4):599-608
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
European Continental Ancestry Group
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Motor Activity
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
The association between vegetable and fruit consumption and risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been investigated by several studies, whereas fewer studies have examined consumption of vegetables and fruits in relation to all-cause mortality. Studies on berries, a rich source of antioxidants, are rare. The purpose of the current study was to examine the association between intake of vegetables, fruits and berries (together and separately) and the risk of all-cause mortality and cause-specific mortality due to cancer and CVD and subtypes of these, in a cohort with very long follow-up.
We used data from a population-based prospective Norwegian cohort study of 10,000 men followed from 1968 through 2008. Information on vegetable, fruit and berry consumption was available from a food frequency questionnaire. Association between these and all-cause mortality, cause-specific mortality due to cancers and CVDs were investigated using Cox proportional hazard regression models.
Men who in total consumed vegetables, fruit and berries more than 27 times per month had an 8-10% reduced risk of all-cause mortality compared with men with a lower consumption. They also had a 20% reduced risk of stroke mortality. Consumption of fruit was inversely related to overall cancer mortality, with hazard rate ratios of 0.94, 0.84 and 0.79 in the second, third and firth quartile, respectively, compared with the first quartile.
Increased consumption of vegetables, fruits and berries was associated with a delayed risk of all-cause mortality and of mortality due to cancer and stroke.
PubMed ID
25087093 View in PubMed
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Dietary non enzymatic antioxidant capacity and the risk of myocardial infarction in the Swedish women's lifestyle and health cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297934
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 02; 33(2):213-221
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
Essi Hantikainen
Marie Löf
Alessandra Grotta
Ylva Trolle Lagerros
Mauro Serafini
Rino Bellocco
Elisabete Weiderpass
Author Affiliation
Department of Statistics and Quantitative Methods, University of Milano-Bicocca, Edificio U7, Via Bicocca degli Arcimboldi 8, 20126, Milan, Italy.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 02; 33(2):213-221
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Foods rich in antioxidants have been associated with a reduced risk of myocardial infarction. However, findings from randomized clinical trials on the role of antioxidant supplementation remain controversial. It has been suggested that antioxidants interact with each other to promote cardiovascular health. We therefore investigated the association between dietary Non Enzymatic Antioxidant Capacity (NEAC), measuring the total antioxidant potential of the whole diet, and the risk of myocardial infarction. We followed 45,882 women aged 30-49 years and free from cardiovascular diseases through record linkages from 1991 until 2012. Dietary NEAC was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire collected at baseline. Total dietary NEAC was categorized into quintiles and multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression models were fitted to estimate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). During a mean follow-up time of 20.3 years we detected 657 incident cases of myocardial infarction. After adjusting for potential confounders, we found a significant 28% lower risk of myocardial infarction among women in the fourth (HR: 0.72; 95% CI 0.55-0.95) and a 40% lower risk among women in the fifth quintile (HR: 0.60, 95% CI 0.45-0.81) of dietary NEAC compared to women in the first quintile, with a significant trend (p-value 
PubMed ID
29372463 View in PubMed
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Mediterranean dietary pattern and risk of breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116509
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(2):e55374
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Elisabeth Couto
Sven Sandin
Marie Löf
Giske Ursin
Hans-Olov Adami
Elisabete Weiderpass
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(2):e55374
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cereals
Cohort Studies
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Fruit
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Risk
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
A Mediterranean diet has a recognized beneficial effect on health and longevity, with a protective influence on several cancers. However, its association with breast cancer risk remains unclear.
We aimed to investigate whether adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern influences breast cancer risk.
The Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort study includes 49,258 women aged 30 to 49 years at recruitment in 1991-1992. Consumption of foods and beverages was measured at enrollment using a food frequency questionnaire. A Mediterranean diet score was constructed based on the consumption of alcohol, vegetables, fruits, legumes, cereals, fish, the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fat, and dairy and meat products. Relative risks (RR) for breast cancer and specific tumor characteristics (invasiveness, histological type, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, malignancy grade and stage) associated with this score were estimated using Cox regression controlling for potential confounders.
1,278 incident breast cancers were diagnosed. Adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern was not statistically significantly associated with reduced risk of breast cancer overall, or with specific breast tumor characteristics. A RR (95% confidence interval) for breast cancer associated with a two-point increment in the Mediterranean diet score was 1.08 (1.00-1.15) in all women, and 1.10 (1.01-1.21) and 1.02 (0.91-1.15) in premenopausal and postmenopausal women, respectively. When alcohol was excluded from the Mediterranean diet score, results became not statistically significant.
Adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern did not decrease breast cancer risk in this cohort of relatively young women.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23390532 View in PubMed
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