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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Aug 21;168(34):2787-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-21-2006
Author
Skibsted Leif H
Dragsted Lars O
Dyerberg Jørn
Hansen Harald S
Kiens Bente
Ovesen Lars F
Tjønneland Anne M
Author Affiliation
Motions- og Ernaeringsrådets, Søborg. sm@meraadet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Aug 21;168(34):2787-9
Date
Aug-21-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Denmark
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Evidence-Based Medicine
Food Habits
Fruit
Health status
Humans
Nutrition Policy
Oxidative Stress
Risk factors
Vegetables
Vitamin E - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
The Danish Fitness and Nutrition Council has evaluated the basis for recommendations on the intake of antioxidants and has found limited basis for increasing the recommended intake levels for the antioxidants vitamin C and E. Evidence was insufficient to support recommendations for polyphenol or carotenoid supplementation. Supplementation with high doses of vitamin E and beta-carotene may present a health risk. A high intake of fruit and vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of lifestyle diseases, but there is no evidence that this association is due to an antioxidant effect.
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Oct 9;168(41):3537; author reply 353717066533
PubMed ID
16942696 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A quantitative assessment of the impact of diet on the mortality of heart disease in Denmark. Estimation of etiologic fraction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10365
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-2000
Author
M. Osler
J. Godtfredsen
M N Grønbaek
P. Marckmann
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Panum Instituttet, afdeling for social medicin og psykosocial sundhed (Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab).
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Date
Sep-11-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
English Abstract
Food Habits
Fruit
Guidelines
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to quantify the impact of different dietary factors on the mortality from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. METHODS: Relative risks and knowledge on the distribution of different dietary factors were used to estimate etiological fractions. RESULTS: It is estimated that an intake of fruit and vegetables and saturated fat as recommended would prevent 12 and 22%, respectively, of deaths from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. An intake of fish among those at high risk for ischaemic heart disease, would lead to a 26% lower mortality, while alcohol intake among abstainers would have no significant quantitative effect. DISCUSSION: These results suggest that changes in dietary habits according to current recommendations would have an impact on public health in Denmark.
PubMed ID
11002740 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Can ingestion of cranberry juice reduce the incidence of urinary tract infections in a department of geriatric medicine?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194560
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 May 14;163(20):2782-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-14-2001
Author
M. Kirchhoff
J. Renneberg
K. Damkjaer
I. Pietersen
M. Schroll
Author Affiliation
H:S Kommunehospitalet, geriatrisk afdeling, og.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 May 14;163(20):2782-6
Date
May-14-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Beverages
Denmark - epidemiology
Fruit
Geriatric Nursing
Humans
Incidence
Specimen Handling
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The incidence of urinary tract infections was compared in two geriatric units, where patients were offered cranberry juice and the usual mixed berry juice, respectively.
In all cases where urinary tract infection was suspected, the doctors noted symptoms and signs used as indication for urinary culture. The urine collected from men was the usual mid-flow specimen, whereas the specimens from women were taken from a bedpan and by catheter. End points were the prevalence of symptoms leading to urine culture, specimens with significant growth of bacteria, and the use of antibiotics.
Urine specimens were cultured in 140/338 cases. The reason for culture in 23% was general symptoms and in 62% urinary tract symptoms. A significant growth of bacteria was found in 54% and this information led to antibiotic treatment in 44%. In all cases (n = 55) where bedpan and catheter specimens were taken, the results were identical.
Cranberry juice in a geriatric department, where the mean stay was 4 weeks, did not influence the incidence of urinary tract infections.
PubMed ID
11374214 View in PubMed
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[Children of guest workers drink so much juice that they get dyspepsia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42553
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1975 Sep 10;75(36):11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-1975
Author
A L Salling
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1975 Sep 10;75(36):11
Date
Sep-10-1975
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Nutrition
Denmark
Drinking Behavior
Fruit
Health education
Humans
Transients and Migrants
PubMed ID
1043325 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables reduces the risk of ischemic heart disease]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16894
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Jun 20;167(25-31):2742-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-2005
Author
Lars F Ovesen
Author Affiliation
Hjerteforeningen, DK-1127 København K. lovesen@hjerteforeningen.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Jun 20;167(25-31):2742-7
Date
Jun-20-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Carotenoids - administration & dosage
Denmark
Diet
English Abstract
Fabaceae
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - prevention & control
Nutrition Policy
Nuts
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Vegetables
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
In Denmark it is recommended to eat 600 g of fruit and vegetables daily. This recommendation has to a large extent been derived from the demonstrated inverse association with the risk of certain major cancer diseases, while the focus with respect to prevention of ischemic heart disease (IHD) has been directed primarily towards a reduced intake of ''hard'' fats. This systematic review includes prospective studies which have examined the association between the intake of fruit and vegetables, as well as specific fruits and vegetables (e.g., nuts and pulses, which are considered to be fruits and vegetables in the Danish recommendations), and the risk of developing IHD. Only one controlled intervention study has been performed. This study came out with a negative result because the advice to increase intake was unsuccessful. In the eight published cohort studies, the overall finding was that the risk of developing IHD was reduced, in the scientifically well-conducted studies, by about 20%. Studies have generally found a dose-response effect, from low intakes to high intakes, up to about 800 g daily. Large cohort studies have shown convincing evidence that increased intake of nuts reduces the risk of IHD. With respect to other groups of fruits and vegetables, there is good but not sufficient scientific evidence that particularly pulses, but also the group of carotenoid-rich fruit and vegetables (such as tomatoes, leafy green vegetables, carrots, broccoli, Brussels sprouts and many berries and fruits), reduces risk. In contrast, it is not possible to single out specific substances in fruit and vegetables as being beneficial. Based on the studies, it seems reasonable to recommend an increased intake of a mix of fruits and vegetables to reduce the risk of IHD. The maximum beneficial amount seems to be about 800 g per day.
PubMed ID
16014256 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The effect on health of dietary antioxidants and antioxidant supplements]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23451
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Dec 19;156(51):7675-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-19-1994
Author
B. Sandström
A V Astrup
J. Dyerberg
G. Hølmer
H E Poulsen
S. Stender
J. Kondrup
E. Gudmand-Høyer
Author Affiliation
Ernaeringsrådet, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Dec 19;156(51):7675-9
Date
Dec-19-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Arteriosclerosis - etiology - prevention & control
English Abstract
Food, Fortified
Fruit
Health status
Humans
Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Vegetables
Abstract
Reactive free oxygen radicals are formed in the reactions involved in normal cell metabolism. This formation is closely regulated e.g. by dietary antioxidants. Present knowledge suggests that an imbalance, with surplus of free radicals, can play a role in the pathogenesis of certain types of cancer, atherosclerosis, and cataract. A number of epidemiological studies have demonstrated a reduced risk of developing these diseases in persons who consume a diet with a high content of vegetables and fruit, which contains large quantities of the antioxidants: beta-carotene, vitamins C and E. Intervention studies, using supplements of these antioxidants, have so far not been able to show a beneficial effect. The apparently protective effect of fruit and vegetables may be due to other active ingredients. In Denmark the average intake of vegetables and fruit is low, and it is estimated that an increased consumption of these foods could reduce the occurrence of certain cancer types and atherosclerosis. In contrast, there is no evidence that antioxidant supplements would provide protection against disease, and their safety remains to be established.
PubMed ID
7839531 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.