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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Birch pollen-related food hypersensitivity: influence of total and specific IgE levels. A multicenter study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40100
Source
Allergy. 1983 Jul;38(5):353-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1983
Author
N E Eriksson
J A Wihl
H. Arrendal
Source
Allergy. 1983 Jul;38(5):353-7
Date
Jul-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibody Specificity
Child
Female
Food Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Fruit - adverse effects
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Nuts - adverse effects
Pollen - immunology
Radioallergosorbent Test
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - complications - diagnosis - immunology
Skin Tests
Sweden
Trees
Abstract
Total IgE, RAST results with tree pollen allergens, and prick test results with birch, grass and mugwort pollen allergens were correlated to 872 hay fever patients' reported food hypersensitivity (FH). A positive correlation was found between FH and the RAST and prick test results with birch pollen allergen. At each level of birch pollen sensitivity the incidence of FH was lower in patients with high total IgE than in those with lower total IgE. A negative correlation was found between grass pollen allergy and FH in birch pollen allergics. It is suggested that antigens in some foods have a specific ability to bridge anti-birch IgE molecules on mast cells. An explanation of the negative correlation between FH and total IgE and grass pollen allergy could be that a high number of non-birch-specific IgE molecules on the mast cells will reduce the probability that two anti-birch IgE molecules should bind on nearby sites.
PubMed ID
6614407 View in PubMed
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[Epidemiological assessment of the role of vegetables and fruit in the spread of dysentery in Leningrad].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243872
Source
Tr Inst Im Pastera. 1982;57:30-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982

[First aid in acute poisonings of children with wild berries].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241878
Source
Med Sestra. 1983 Jun;42(6):5-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1983
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1984 May;178(5):393-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1984
Author
K. Harju
P. Ronkainen
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1984 May;178(5):393-6
Date
May-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholic Beverages - analysis
Finland
Food contamination - analysis
Fruit - analysis
Metals - analysis
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Abstract
The metal content of some representative Finnish berry liqueurs was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The berry liqueurs were prepared from cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus), arctic bramble (Rubus arcticus), cranberry (Vaccinum oxycoccus), lingonberry (Vaccinum vitis-idaea) and sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides). In addition some other Finnish berry, fruit and herbal liqueurs were analyzed. The trace elements studied were Al, As, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Rb, and Zn. The level of poisonous metals in all the samples was very low: As less than 0.1, Cd less than 0.005 and Pb less than or equal to 0.1 mg/l.
PubMed ID
6464557 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.