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Assessing validity of a short food frequency questionnaire on present dietary intake of elderly Icelanders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126210
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Tinna Eysteinsdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali National-University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. tinnaey@landspitali.is
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Cod Liver Oil
Coffee
Dairy Products
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Iceland
Interviews as Topic
Male
Meat
Nutrition Assessment
Questionnaires - standards
Sex Factors
Tea
Vegetables
Abstract
Few studies exist on the validity of food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) administered to elderly people. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of a short FFQ on present dietary intake, developed specially for the AGES-Reykjavik Study, which includes 5,764 elderly individuals. Assessing the validity of FFQs is essential before they are used in studies on diet-related disease risk and health outcomes.
128 healthy elderly participants (74 y ± 5.7; 58.6% female) answered the AGES-FFQ, and subsequently filled out a 3-day weighed food record. Validity of the AGES-FFQ was assessed by comparing its answers to the dietary data obtained from the weighed food records, using Spearman's rank correlation, Chi-Square/Kendall's tau, and a Jonckheere-Terpstra test for trend.
For men a correlation = 0.4 was found for potatoes, fresh fruits, oatmeal/muesli, cakes/cookies, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee, tea and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.40-0.71). A lower, but acceptable, correlation was also found for raw vegetables (r = 0.33). The highest correlation for women was found for consumption of rye bread, oatmeal/muesli, raw vegetables, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee and tea (r = 0.40-0.61). An acceptable correlation was also found for fish topping/salad, fresh fruit, blood/liver sausage, whole-wheat bread, and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.28-0.37). Questions on meat/fish meals, cooked vegetables and soft drinks did not show a significant correlation to the reference method. Pearson Chi-Square and Kendall's tau showed similar results, as did the Jonckheere-Terpstra trend test.
A majority of the questions in the AGES-FFQ had an acceptable correlation and may be used to rank individuals according to their level of intake of several important foods/food groups. The AGES-FFQ on present diet may therefore be used to study the relationship between consumption of several specific foods/food groups and various health-related endpoints gathered in the AGES-Reykjavik Study.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22413931 View in PubMed
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Dietary antioxidants and the risk of lung cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225751
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Sep 1;134(5):471-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1991
Author
P. Knekt
R. Järvinen
R. Seppänen
A. Rissanen
A. Aromaa
O P Heinonen
D. Albanes
M. Heinonen
E. Pukkala
L. Teppo
Author Affiliation
Research Institute for Social Security, Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Sep 1;134(5):471-9
Date
Sep-1-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Ascorbic Acid - pharmacology
Carotenoids - pharmacology
Cohort Studies
Dairy Products
Diet
Eating
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Meat products
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Retinoids - pharmacology
Risk
Selenium - pharmacology
Smoking
Vegetables
Vitamin E - pharmacology
Abstract
The relation between the intake of retinoids, carotenoids, vitamin E, vitamin C, and selenium and the subsequent risk of lung cancer was studied among 4,538 initially cancer-free Finnish men aged 20-69 years. During a follow-up of 20 years beginning in 1966-1972, 117 lung cancer cases were diagnosed. Inverse gradients were observed between the intake of carotenoids, vitamin E, and vitamin C and the incidence of lung cancer among nonsmokers, for whom the age-adjusted relative risks of lung cancer in the lowest tertile of intake compared with that in the highest tertile were 2.5 (p value for trend = 0.04), 3.1 (p = 0.12), and 3.1 (p less than 0.01) for the three intakes, respectively. Adjustment for various potential confounding factors did not materially alter the results, and the associations did not seem to be due to preclinical cancer. In the total cohort, there was an inverse association between intake of margarine and fruits and risk of lung cancer. The relative risk of lung cancer for the lowest compared with the highest tertile of margarine intake was 4.0 (p less than 0.001), and that for fruits was 1.8 (p = 0.01). These associations persisted after adjustment for the micronutrient intakes and were stronger among nonsmokers. The results suggest that carotenoids, vitamin E, and vitamin C may be protective against lung cancer among nonsmokers. Food sources rich in these micronutrients may also have other constituents with independent protective effects against lung cancer.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Nov 1;136(9):1167-9; author reply 1169-701462977
PubMed ID
1897503 View in PubMed
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Intakes of fruits and vegetables, carotenoids and vitamins A, E, C in relation to the risk of bladder cancer in the ATBC cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187764
Source
Br J Cancer. 2002 Oct 21;87(9):960-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-21-2002
Author
D S Michaud
P. Pietinen
P R Taylor
M. Virtanen
J. Virtamo
D. Albanes
Author Affiliation
Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD 20852, USA. michaudd@mail.nih.gov
Source
Br J Cancer. 2002 Oct 21;87(9):960-5
Date
Oct-21-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Cohort Studies
Diet
Eating
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Vegetables
Vitamin A - administration & dosage
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
Abstract
We examined the relation between dietary fruit and vegetables, carotenoids and vitamin intakes and the risk of bladder cancer among male smokers in a prospective cohort study. Over a median of 11 years, we followed 27 111 male smokers aged 50-69 years who were initially enrolled in the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study. During this period, 344 men developed bladder cancer. All of these men had completed a 276-food item dietary questionnaire at baseline. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the relative risks and 95% confidence intervals and to simultaneously adjust for age, smoking history, energy intake and intervention group. Consumption of fruits and vegetables was not associated with the risk of bladder cancer (relative risk=1.28; 95% confidence intervals CI: 0.89-1.84, for highest vs lowest quintile). Similarly, no associations were observed for groups of fruits or vegetables (berries and cruciferous vegetables), or for specific fruits and vegetables. Dietary intakes of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein/zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, vitamins A, E, and C, and folate were not related to the risk of bladder cancer. These findings suggest that fruit and vegetable intakes are not likely to be associated with bladder cancer risk. However, these results may not be generalisable to non-smokers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12434284 View in PubMed
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