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597 records – page 1 of 60.

[Bacterium nodoantrum nova sp.--the agent of apple tuberculosis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70104
Source
Mikrobiol Zh. 1970 Jan-Feb;32(1):50-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
I H Skripal'
Source
Mikrobiol Zh. 1970 Jan-Feb;32(1):50-3
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria
Fruit
Plant Diseases
PubMed ID
5517364 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Nurse. 2012 Sep;108(7):30-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Heidi Smith
Caroline Saunders
Author Affiliation
Health and Performance Centre, University of Guelph.
Source
Can Nurse. 2012 Sep;108(7):30-1
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diet
Fruit
Humans
Nutritional Requirements
Vegetables
PubMed ID
23094503 View in PubMed
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Source
Diabetes Self Manag. 2003 Jul-Aug;20(4):88-90, 93-4, 96
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sharon Palmer
Source
Diabetes Self Manag. 2003 Jul-Aug;20(4):88-90, 93-4, 96
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coffee
Cookery
Diet
Fruit
Humans
Shellfish
Sweden
PubMed ID
12908445 View in PubMed
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Wild, edible and poisonous plants of Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76009
Source
Fairbanks: Cooperative Extension Service, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Date
1953, 1958, 1974, 1976, 1993
Author
Heller, CA
Source
Fairbanks: Cooperative Extension Service, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Date
1953, 1958, 1974, 1976, 1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Berries
Fruits
Greens
Leaves
Roots
Stems
Wild plants
Abstract
Documents common edible and poisonous plants found in Alaska, with suggestions on storage and best eating practices.
Notes
Mutliple editions held at the UAA Consortium Library and in the ARLIS collection.
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How are your berries? Perspectives of Alaska's environmental managers on trends in wild berry abundance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279661
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:28704
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jerry Hupp
Michael Brubaker
Kira Wilkinson
Jennifer Williamson
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:28704
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Food Supply
Fruit
Humans
Rural Population
Abstract
Wild berries are a valued traditional food in Alaska. Phytochemicals in wild berries may contribute to the prevention of vascular disease, cancer and cognitive decline, making berry consumption important to community health in rural areas. Little was known regarding which species of berries were important to Alaskan communities, the number of species typically picked in communities and whether recent environmental change has affected berry abundance or quality.
To identify species of wild berries that were consumed by people in different ecological regions of Alaska and to determine if perceived berry abundance was changing for some species or in some regions.
We asked tribal environmental managers throughout Alaska for their views on which among 12 types of wild berries were important to their communities and whether berry harvests over the past decade were different than in previous years. We received responses from 96 individuals in 73 communities.
Berries that were considered very important to communities differed among ecological regions of Alaska. Low-bush blueberry (Vaccinium uliginosum and V. caespitosum), cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus) and salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis) were most frequently identified as very important berries for communities in the boreal, polar and maritime ecoregions, respectively. For 7 of the 12 berries on the survey, a majority of respondents indicated that in the past decade abundance had either declined or become more variable.
Our study is an example of how environmental managers and participants in local observer networks can report on the status of wild resources in rural Alaska. Their observations suggest that there have been changes in the productivity of some wild berries in the past decade, resulting in greater uncertainty among communities regarding the security of berry harvests. Monitoring and experimental studies are needed to determine how environmental change may affect berry abundance.
Notes
Cites: Ann Neurol. 2012 Jul;72(1):135-4322535616
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72. doi: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.2118823977647
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1995 Feb 27;155(4):381-67848021
Cites: Ecohealth. 2011 Jun;8(2):199-20921915737
Cites: Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Jun;51(6):652-6417533651
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Sep;67(4):335-4819024803
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Apr;68(2):109-2219517871
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Apr 14;58(7):3884-90020025229
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Jun 25;56(12):4457-6218522397
PubMed ID
26380964 View in PubMed
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Source
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U.S. Department of the Navy, NavMed 119
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1943
Author
Standley, PC
Author Affiliation
Field Museum of Natural History
Source
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U.S. Department of the Navy, NavMed 119
Date
1943
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Edible fruits and berries
Edible greens
Edible roots and bulbs
Abstract
This manual is to be used by military personnel separated from their units while on duty in the Arctic regions. Its purpose is to aid individuals to recognize edible food plants of the area so that in emergency they may subsist from the land. The manual illustrates and describes briefly the most important edible berries, greens, and roots of the most northern areas.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 100859.
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[Mineral composition of watermelon pulp in relation to the degree of ripeness and the region of its cultivation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62283
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1988 Sep-Oct;(5):68-9
Publication Type
Article

[Peculiarities of the nutrition of the population in various regions of the Russian Federation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62664
Source
Gig Sanit. 1967 Sep;32(9):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1967
Author
Iu R Khodosh
Source
Gig Sanit. 1967 Sep;32(9):30-3
Date
Sep-1967
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbohydrates
Cereals
Fruit
Humans
Meat
Nutrition Surveys
Oils
Russia
Siberia
Vegetables
PubMed ID
4239310 View in PubMed
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Foodborne outbreaks in Canada linked to produce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192387
Source
J Food Prot. 2001 Nov;64(11):1863-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
A M Sewell
J M Farber
Author Affiliation
Health Canada, Bureau of Microbial Hazards, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
J Food Prot. 2001 Nov;64(11):1863-77
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology
Fruit - microbiology
Humans
Vegetables - microbiology
Abstract
Examples of foodborne outbreaks traced to fresh fruits and vegetables can be found worldwide. The quantity of produce eaten per capita has been increasing steadily over the past two decades, creating a heightened potential for produce-related foodborne disease. A number of outbreaks identified during this time period were reviewed, with particular emphasis placed on incidents that have occurred in Canada. The collective information highlights the diversity of infectious agents and produce items involved, with a view to the prevention of fresh produce-related foodborne disease in the future.
PubMed ID
11726177 View in PubMed
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[Nutrition value of wild-growing fruits from mountain Dagestan and its safety after fast freezing and cold storage].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289844
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(4):76-81
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
B M Guseynova
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(4):76-81
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Dagestan
Food analysis
Food Preservation
Food Safety
Freezing
Fruit - chemistry
Nutritive Value
Abstract
Results of research of mineral composition, content of vitamin C and P, titrable acids, pectinaceous and phenol substances in fresh, fast-frozen (t=-30 °C), and also stored within 3 and 9 months (t=-18 °C) fruits of wild-growing blackberry, cornel, medlar and sea-buckthorn are presented in article. Determination of mineral composition was carried out by flame atomic absorption photometry, vitamin C and pectinaceous substances -by titirimetric methods, phenolic substances and vitamin P - by colorimetric methods. Vitamin C content was minimal in fresh fruits of cornel (6.9±0.3 mg%), amounted to 21.7-32.0 mg% in the fruits of blackberries and medlar and reached 180.1±7.2 mg% in the fruit of sea-buckthorn. Vitamin P concentration ranged from 34.9 (sea-buckthorn) to 180.0 mg% (cornel). Berries of a cornel contained also the greatest number of titrable acids (33.2±1.3 g/dm3), phenolic compounds (243.0±4.8 mg%) and pectinaceous substances (2.91±0.08%). The most significant content of potassium (521±15.6 mg%), calcium (133.2±5.2 mg%), magnesium (62.4±2.5 mg%) and iron (2.81±0.05 mg%) was revealed in medlar fruits. Consumption of 100 g of the studied fruits provides daily requirements of a human body, depending on a species of wild plants: in calcium -for 2-13.3%, potassium - for 7.0-20.8%, magnesium - for 8.1-15.6%, iron - for 5.9-19.2% and in vitamin C - from 5.8-24.6 to 145.7% in the case of sea buckthorn. The applied processing method of conservation - fast freezing (t=-30 °?) of fruits and their long storage (t=-18 °?) is the effective way ensuring high safety of nutrients in them. In the studied berries after 9-months cold storage the safety of vitamin C varied ranging from 55.7 (blackberry) to 76.1% (cornel), and vitamin P - from 81.9 (sea-buckthorn) to 92.8% (cornel). Stability of titrable acids, except for medlar fruits, varied from 84.2% (blackberry) to 94.0% (sea-buckthorn). The safety of phenolic and pectinaceous compounds by the end of 9 months of storage, has averaged 90.6 and 95.6% respectively in comparison with their initial quantity in fresh fruits. The mineral composition was the stablest. After completion of experiment the safety of mineral substances in fruits of wild plants fluctuated from 94.6 to 98.5%. Distinctions in change of biochemical complexes of berries of blackberry, cornel, medlar and sea-buckthorn at fast freezing (t=-30 °?) and storage (t=-18 °?), apparently, are caused by specific features, content of free and bound water, thickness of cellular walls, durability of a thin skin of fruits, as well as by concentration of the components that inhibit the destructive processes occurring at the cellular and molecular level.
PubMed ID
29381286 View in PubMed
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597 records – page 1 of 60.