Skip header and navigation

Refine By

597 records – page 1 of 60.

Importance of quality assurance in Canadian pesticide analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234530
Source
J Assoc Off Anal Chem. 1987 Nov-Dec;70(6):941-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
H B Conacher
Author Affiliation
Health and Welfare Canada, Food Research Division, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
J Assoc Off Anal Chem. 1987 Nov-Dec;70(6):941-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Fishes - metabolism
Food analysis
Fruit - analysis
Humans
Meat - analysis
Pesticides - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Quality Control
Reference Standards
Abstract
Three important elements of the pesticide quality assurance program in the Health Protection Branch of Canada are described--the sampling protocol, the repository of pesticide standards, and the check sample program of the Federal Interdepartmental Committee on Pesticides. All play an important role in ensuring the production of sound, valid pesticide residue data. Efforts to improve each element will continue in the future.
PubMed ID
3125146 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Nutrition value of wild-growing fruits from mountain Dagestan and its safety after fast freezing and cold storage].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289844
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(4):76-81
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
B M Guseynova
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2016; 85(4):76-81
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Dagestan
Food analysis
Food Preservation
Food Safety
Freezing
Fruit - chemistry
Nutritive Value
Abstract
Results of research of mineral composition, content of vitamin C and P, titrable acids, pectinaceous and phenol substances in fresh, fast-frozen (t=-30 °C), and also stored within 3 and 9 months (t=-18 °C) fruits of wild-growing blackberry, cornel, medlar and sea-buckthorn are presented in article. Determination of mineral composition was carried out by flame atomic absorption photometry, vitamin C and pectinaceous substances -by titirimetric methods, phenolic substances and vitamin P - by colorimetric methods. Vitamin C content was minimal in fresh fruits of cornel (6.9±0.3 mg%), amounted to 21.7-32.0 mg% in the fruits of blackberries and medlar and reached 180.1±7.2 mg% in the fruit of sea-buckthorn. Vitamin P concentration ranged from 34.9 (sea-buckthorn) to 180.0 mg% (cornel). Berries of a cornel contained also the greatest number of titrable acids (33.2±1.3 g/dm3), phenolic compounds (243.0±4.8 mg%) and pectinaceous substances (2.91±0.08%). The most significant content of potassium (521±15.6 mg%), calcium (133.2±5.2 mg%), magnesium (62.4±2.5 mg%) and iron (2.81±0.05 mg%) was revealed in medlar fruits. Consumption of 100 g of the studied fruits provides daily requirements of a human body, depending on a species of wild plants: in calcium -for 2-13.3%, potassium - for 7.0-20.8%, magnesium - for 8.1-15.6%, iron - for 5.9-19.2% and in vitamin C - from 5.8-24.6 to 145.7% in the case of sea buckthorn. The applied processing method of conservation - fast freezing (t=-30 °?) of fruits and their long storage (t=-18 °?) is the effective way ensuring high safety of nutrients in them. In the studied berries after 9-months cold storage the safety of vitamin C varied ranging from 55.7 (blackberry) to 76.1% (cornel), and vitamin P - from 81.9 (sea-buckthorn) to 92.8% (cornel). Stability of titrable acids, except for medlar fruits, varied from 84.2% (blackberry) to 94.0% (sea-buckthorn). The safety of phenolic and pectinaceous compounds by the end of 9 months of storage, has averaged 90.6 and 95.6% respectively in comparison with their initial quantity in fresh fruits. The mineral composition was the stablest. After completion of experiment the safety of mineral substances in fruits of wild plants fluctuated from 94.6 to 98.5%. Distinctions in change of biochemical complexes of berries of blackberry, cornel, medlar and sea-buckthorn at fast freezing (t=-30 °?) and storage (t=-18 °?), apparently, are caused by specific features, content of free and bound water, thickness of cellular walls, durability of a thin skin of fruits, as well as by concentration of the components that inhibit the destructive processes occurring at the cellular and molecular level.
PubMed ID
29381286 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Nutrition value of national milk products with the addition of wild berries and wild food plants of Yakutia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289852
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2015; 84(6):132-40
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2015
Author
U M Lebedeva
A F Abramov
K M Stepanov
V T Vasilyeva
A A Efimova
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2015; 84(6):132-40
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cultured Milk Products - analysis
Eating
Female
Food analysis
Fruit
Humans
Male
Nutritive Value
Siberia
Abstract
Results of an assessment of the actual food of the population in various medicoeconomic zones of the republic (industrial, agricultural, Arctic) by method of the frequency analysis of food consumption are presented in the article. The analysis of control of compliance of quality and safety of foodstuff in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia), according to requirements of the legislation of the Russian Federation, acts of the Customs union has been made. Decreased consumption of such foodstuff as milk, fish and meat products including products from local food staples and national dishes has been established. The data obtained are medic-biological justification for search of ways of optimization of population nutrition, creation of specialized products with a functional purpose and for the prevention of the states and diseases connected with nutrition violation. They also define innovative development of the republic in questions of biotechnologies of the production of specialized foods for various groups of the population. Results of chemical composition research of the most used wild-growing food plants of Yakutia are given. The questions connected with the nutrition and biological value of the dairy products of a functional purpose with use of wild-growing food herbs and berries of Yakutia are discussed.
PubMed ID
29378108 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between physical home environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5-year-olds: the BRA-study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290267
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 May; 20(7):1173-1183
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
May-2017
Author
Anne Lene Kristiansen
Mona Bjelland
Anne Himberg-Sundet
Nanna Lien
Lene Frost Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition,Institute of Basic Medical Sciences,University of Oslo,PO Box 1046 Blindern,0316 Oslo,Norway.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 May; 20(7):1173-1183
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Child, Preschool
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Norway
Nutrition Assessment
Parent-Child Relations
Pilot Projects
Principal Component Analysis
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
First, to explore item pools developed to measure the physical home environment of pre-school children and assess the psychometric properties of these item pools; second, to explore associations between this environment and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5-year-olds.
Data were collected in three steps: (i) a parental web-based questionnaire assessing the child's vegetable intake and factors potentially influencing the child's vegetable consumption; (ii) direct observation of the children's fruit, berry and vegetable intakes at two meals in one day in the kindergarten; and (iii) a parental web-based 24 h recall.
The target group for this study was pre-school children born in 2010 and 2011, attending public or private kindergartens in the counties of Vestfold and Buskerud, Norway.
A total of 633 children participated.
Principal component analysis on the thirteen-item pool assessing availability/accessibility resulted in two factors labelled 'availability at home' and 'accessibility at home', while the eight-item pool assessing barriers resulted in two factors labelled 'serving barriers' and 'purchase barriers'. The psychometric properties of these factors were satisfactory. Linear regression of the associations between vegetable intake and the factors showed generally positive associations with 'availability at home' and 'accessibility at home' and negative associations with 'serving barriers'.
This age group has so far been understudied and there is a need for comparable studies. Our findings highlight the importance of targeting the physical home environment of pre-school children in future interventions as there are important modifiable factors that both promote and hinder vegetable consumption in this environment.
PubMed ID
27995831 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food neophobia and its association with intake of fish and other selected foods in a Norwegian sample of toddlers: A cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290428
Source
Appetite. 2017 Jul 01; 114:110-117
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-01-2017
Author
Sissel H Helland
Elling Bere
Helga Birgit Bjørnarå
Nina Cecilie Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Norway. Electronic address: sissel.h.helland@uia.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Jul 01; 114:110-117
Date
Jul-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Child Behavior - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fishes
Food Preferences - psychology
Fruit
Humans
Male
Norway
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
Reluctance to try novel foods (food neophobia) prevents toddlers from accepting healthy foods such as fish and vegetables, which are important for child development and health. Eating habits established between ages 2 and 3 years normally track into adulthood and are therefore highly influential; even so, there are few studies addressing food neophobia in this age group. This cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between the level of food neophobia and the frequency of toddlers' intake of fish, meat, berries, fruit, vegetables, and sweet and salty snacks. Parents of 505 toddlers completed a questionnaire assessing the degree of food neophobia in their toddlers (mean age 28 months, SD ± 3.5), and frequency of intake of various foods. Food neophobia was rated by the Children's Food Neophobia Scale (CFNS, score range 6-42). Associations between CFNS score and food frequency were examined using hierarchical multiple regression models, adjusting for significant covariates. Toddlers with higher CFNS scores had less frequent intake of vegetables (ß = -0.28, p 
PubMed ID
28323060 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary patterns are associated with various vascular health markers and complications in type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290786
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2016 Aug; 30(6):1144-50
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Aila J Ahola
Riitta Freese
Sari Mäkimattila
Carol Forsblom
Per-Henrik Groop
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland; Abdominal Center Nephrology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; Research Program Unit, Diabetes and Obesity, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2016 Aug; 30(6):1144-50
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Blood pressure
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications
Diet
Female
Finland
Fishes
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Vegetables
Yogurt
Abstract
Diet plays an important role in the management of type 1 diabetes. However, the association between dietary intake and health has not been extensively studied in this population. We studied the cross-sectional association between dietary factors, and selected vascular health markers and complications in type 1 diabetes.
Data from 874 individuals with type 1 diabetes participating in the FinnDiane Study were included. Dietary intake was assessed using a self-reported questionnaire and a diet score, expressing the extent to which individuals adhered to the dietary recommendations, was calculated. Diet questionnaire was also used to reveal dietary patterns using factor analysis.
Seven factors with high degree of inter-correlation were formed; healthy, traditional, vegetable, sweets, modern, low-fat cheese, and fish and eggs. In multivariate models, higher diet score and healthy factor score were associated with better glycaemic control. Higher diet score was associated with higher, while sweets, and fish and eggs patterns were associated with lower systolic blood pressure. Healthy, sweets, and fish and eggs factors were additionally associated with lower diastolic blood pressure.
Closer adherence to the dietary recommendations, and a diet high in fresh vegetables, fruits and berries, cooked vegetables, fish dishes, and yoghurt may be beneficial for the glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes. Moreover, a diet pattern with fish and eggs may have beneficial effects for blood pressure.
PubMed ID
27105935 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between fruit and vegetable consumption in mothers and children in low-income, urban neighborhoods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166274
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2007 Oct;34(5):723-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Marie-Pierre Sylvestre
Jennifer O'Loughlin
Katherine Gray-Donald
James Hanley
Gilles Paradis
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. marie-pierre.sylvestre@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2007 Oct;34(5):723-34
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Continental Population Groups
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mothers
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Vegetables
Abstract
To understand factors influencing fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption in children, the authors studied the association between F&V consumption in mothers and children in a sample of 1,106 boys and girls in Grades 4-6 in 24 elementary schools in low-income, multiethnic neighborhoods in Montreal, Canada. Approximately 10% of girls and 19% of boys reported not having eaten any vegetables in the week prior to questionnaire administration; 53% of girls and 63% of boys did not consume whole fruits daily. Each unit increase in F&V consumption in mothers was associated with a 10% to 20% increase in F&V consumption in children. Interventions to improve F&V consumption should aim to improve awareness among parents of the importance of fruits and vegetables and of the impact of their own behavior on their children's F&V consumption.
PubMed ID
17142242 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food patterns and socioeconomic indicators of food consumption amongst Inuvialuit in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138235
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:59-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
E. Erber
L. Beck
B N Hopping
T. Sheehy
E. De Roose
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, NC, USA.
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:59-66
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Eating - ethnology
Educational Status
Energy intake
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Fruit
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories
Questionnaires
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
Inuvialuit in the Canadian Arctic have been experiencing a nutrition transition resulting in a decrease in nutrient-dense food consumption, which may, in part, explain this population's increasing chronic disease rates. Because the available literature is limited, the present study aimed to document the extent of this transition by examining current dietary patterns and socioeconomic factors affecting food group consumption.
This cross-sectional study was conducted in three Inuvialuit communities in the Northwest Territories between 2007 and 2008. A validated food frequency questionnaire determined intake frequency of fruit and vegetables (FV), traditional foods (TF) and non-nutrient-dense foods (NNDF). Socioeconomic status (SES) was assessed by questions on education, ownership of items in working condition used to create a Material Style of Life (MSL) scale and residents in household employed/on income support. Daily intake frequencies were compared by gender and age group using Wilcoxon rank sum test. SES association with food group intake was determined using logistic regression.
The response rate was 65-85%. One hundred and seventy-five participants were female and 55 were male, aged 19-84 years [mean (SD) 44 (14)]. Mean frequencies of FV and TF consumption were 1.6 (1.5) and 1.6 (1.7) times per day, respectively. NNDF were reported 9.2 (3.0) times per day. The highest MSL score (>12) was significantly associated with higher fruit (=0.7 times per day) and higher TF intake (=1.1 times per day) compared with the lowest score (=7). An intermediate MSL score (8-12) was related to higher vegetable consumption (=0.4 times per day).
NNDF were consumed approximately seven times more frequently than TF in the present study, indicating that the dietary transition is well underway amongst Inuvialuit. Participants with higher SES were more likely to consume nutrient-dense foods, suggesting possible cost barriers.
PubMed ID
21158963 View in PubMed
Less detail

Socioeconomic indicators and frequency of traditional food, junk food, and fruit and vegetable consumption amongst Inuit adults in the Canadian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138236
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:51-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
B N Hopping
E. Erber
E. Mead
T. Sheehy
C. Roache
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, NC, USA.
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:51-8
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arctic Regions
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Eating - ethnology
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Fruit
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Nunavut
Questionnaires
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
Increasing consumption of non-nutrient-dense foods (NNDF), decreasing consumption of traditional foods (TF) and low consumption of fruit and vegetables (FV) may contribute to increasing chronic disease rates amongst Inuit. The present study aimed to assess the daily frequency and socioeconomic and demographic factors influencing consumption of TF, FV and NNDF amongst Inuit adults in Nunavut, Canada.
Using a cross-sectional study design and random household sampling in three communities in Nunavut, a food frequency questionnaire developed for the population was used to assess frequency of NNDF, TF and FV consumption amongst Inuit adults. Socioeconomic status (SES) was assessed by education level, ownership of items in working condition, and whether or not people in the household were employed or on income support. Mean frequencies of daily consumption were compared across gender and age groups, and associations with socioeconomic indicators were analysed using logistic regression.
Two hundred and eleven participants (36 men, 175 women; mean (standard deviation) ages 42.1 (15.0) and 42.2 (13.2) years, respectively; response rate 69-93%) completed the study. Mean frequencies of consumption for NNDF, TF and FV were 6.3, 1.9 and 1.6 times per day, respectively. On average, participants =50 years consumed NNDF (P=0.003) and FV (P=0.01) more frequently and TF (P=0.01) less frequently than participants >50 years. Education was positively associated with FV consumption and negatively associated with TF consumption. Households on income support were more likely to consume TF and NNDF.
These results support the hypothesis that the nutrition transition taking place amongst Inuit in Nunavut results in elevated consumption of NNDF compared with TF and FV.
PubMed ID
21158962 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence and risk factors for self-reported chronic disease amongst Inuvialuit populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138237
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:43-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
E. Erber
L. Beck
E. De Roose
S. Sharma
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, NC, USA.
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:43-50
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease - ethnology
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology
Eating - ethnology
Female
Fruit
Heart Diseases - ethnology
Humans
Hypertension - ethnology
Inuits - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Neoplasms - ethnology
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Self Report
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
Chronic disease prevalence amongst Canadian Arctic populations is increasing, but the literature amongst Inuvialuit is limited. The present study aimed to provide baseline data that could be used to monitor changes in chronic disease risk factors and long-term health in the Arctic by determining prevalence and risk factors of self-reported chronic disease amongst adult Inuvialuit in remote communities.
Self-reported demographics and history of chronic disease (hypertension, heart disease, diabetes and cancer) were collected in three communities between July 2007 and July 2008 in the Northwest Territories. Food frequency questionnaires recorded dietary intake, International Physical Activity Questionnaires recorded physical activity and anthropometric measures of height and weight were obtained.
Response rates ranged from 65-85%. More than 20% of the 228 participants aged 19-84 years reported having a chronic disease. Age-adjusted prevalence was 28, 9, 9 and 6 per 100 for hypertension, heart disease, diabetes and cancer, respectively. Compared with non-cases, participants reporting hypertension were more likely to have a higher body mass index and a lower level of education. Hypertension was more common amongst participants reporting heart disease and diabetes than Inuvialuit not reporting these morbidities.
Inuvialuit participants in this study were most affected by hypertension and diabetes compared with heart disease or any cancer. Female participants had a higher prevalence of heart disease compared with the Canadian average. Primary preventive strategies are necessary to mitigate the increasing rates of chronic disease risk factors in this population. Further studies with a larger sample size and measured chronic disease are necessary to confirm the findings obtained in the present study.
PubMed ID
21158961 View in PubMed
Less detail

597 records – page 1 of 60.