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[Nutrition value of national milk products with the addition of wild berries and wild food plants of Yakutia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289852
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2015; 84(6):132-40
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2015
Author
U M Lebedeva
A F Abramov
K M Stepanov
V T Vasilyeva
A A Efimova
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2015; 84(6):132-40
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cultured Milk Products - analysis
Eating
Female
Food analysis
Fruit
Humans
Male
Nutritive Value
Siberia
Abstract
Results of an assessment of the actual food of the population in various medicoeconomic zones of the republic (industrial, agricultural, Arctic) by method of the frequency analysis of food consumption are presented in the article. The analysis of control of compliance of quality and safety of foodstuff in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia), according to requirements of the legislation of the Russian Federation, acts of the Customs union has been made. Decreased consumption of such foodstuff as milk, fish and meat products including products from local food staples and national dishes has been established. The data obtained are medic-biological justification for search of ways of optimization of population nutrition, creation of specialized products with a functional purpose and for the prevention of the states and diseases connected with nutrition violation. They also define innovative development of the republic in questions of biotechnologies of the production of specialized foods for various groups of the population. Results of chemical composition research of the most used wild-growing food plants of Yakutia are given. The questions connected with the nutrition and biological value of the dairy products of a functional purpose with use of wild-growing food herbs and berries of Yakutia are discussed.
PubMed ID
29378108 View in PubMed
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Associations between physical home environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5-year-olds: the BRA-study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290267
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 May; 20(7):1173-1183
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
May-2017
Author
Anne Lene Kristiansen
Mona Bjelland
Anne Himberg-Sundet
Nanna Lien
Lene Frost Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition,Institute of Basic Medical Sciences,University of Oslo,PO Box 1046 Blindern,0316 Oslo,Norway.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 May; 20(7):1173-1183
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Adult
Child, Preschool
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Norway
Nutrition Assessment
Parent-Child Relations
Pilot Projects
Principal Component Analysis
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
First, to explore item pools developed to measure the physical home environment of pre-school children and assess the psychometric properties of these item pools; second, to explore associations between this environment and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5-year-olds.
Data were collected in three steps: (i) a parental web-based questionnaire assessing the child's vegetable intake and factors potentially influencing the child's vegetable consumption; (ii) direct observation of the children's fruit, berry and vegetable intakes at two meals in one day in the kindergarten; and (iii) a parental web-based 24 h recall.
The target group for this study was pre-school children born in 2010 and 2011, attending public or private kindergartens in the counties of Vestfold and Buskerud, Norway.
A total of 633 children participated.
Principal component analysis on the thirteen-item pool assessing availability/accessibility resulted in two factors labelled 'availability at home' and 'accessibility at home', while the eight-item pool assessing barriers resulted in two factors labelled 'serving barriers' and 'purchase barriers'. The psychometric properties of these factors were satisfactory. Linear regression of the associations between vegetable intake and the factors showed generally positive associations with 'availability at home' and 'accessibility at home' and negative associations with 'serving barriers'.
This age group has so far been understudied and there is a need for comparable studies. Our findings highlight the importance of targeting the physical home environment of pre-school children in future interventions as there are important modifiable factors that both promote and hinder vegetable consumption in this environment.
PubMed ID
27995831 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food neophobia and its association with intake of fish and other selected foods in a Norwegian sample of toddlers: A cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290428
Source
Appetite. 2017 Jul 01; 114:110-117
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-01-2017
Author
Sissel H Helland
Elling Bere
Helga Birgit Bjørnarå
Nina Cecilie Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Norway. Electronic address: sissel.h.helland@uia.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Jul 01; 114:110-117
Date
Jul-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Child Behavior - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fishes
Food Preferences - psychology
Fruit
Humans
Male
Norway
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
Reluctance to try novel foods (food neophobia) prevents toddlers from accepting healthy foods such as fish and vegetables, which are important for child development and health. Eating habits established between ages 2 and 3 years normally track into adulthood and are therefore highly influential; even so, there are few studies addressing food neophobia in this age group. This cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between the level of food neophobia and the frequency of toddlers' intake of fish, meat, berries, fruit, vegetables, and sweet and salty snacks. Parents of 505 toddlers completed a questionnaire assessing the degree of food neophobia in their toddlers (mean age 28 months, SD ± 3.5), and frequency of intake of various foods. Food neophobia was rated by the Children's Food Neophobia Scale (CFNS, score range 6-42). Associations between CFNS score and food frequency were examined using hierarchical multiple regression models, adjusting for significant covariates. Toddlers with higher CFNS scores had less frequent intake of vegetables (ß = -0.28, p 
PubMed ID
28323060 View in PubMed
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Dietary patterns are associated with various vascular health markers and complications in type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290786
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2016 Aug; 30(6):1144-50
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Aila J Ahola
Riitta Freese
Sari Mäkimattila
Carol Forsblom
Per-Henrik Groop
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland; Abdominal Center Nephrology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; Research Program Unit, Diabetes and Obesity, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Diabetes Complications. 2016 Aug; 30(6):1144-50
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Blood pressure
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications
Diet
Female
Finland
Fishes
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Vegetables
Yogurt
Abstract
Diet plays an important role in the management of type 1 diabetes. However, the association between dietary intake and health has not been extensively studied in this population. We studied the cross-sectional association between dietary factors, and selected vascular health markers and complications in type 1 diabetes.
Data from 874 individuals with type 1 diabetes participating in the FinnDiane Study were included. Dietary intake was assessed using a self-reported questionnaire and a diet score, expressing the extent to which individuals adhered to the dietary recommendations, was calculated. Diet questionnaire was also used to reveal dietary patterns using factor analysis.
Seven factors with high degree of inter-correlation were formed; healthy, traditional, vegetable, sweets, modern, low-fat cheese, and fish and eggs. In multivariate models, higher diet score and healthy factor score were associated with better glycaemic control. Higher diet score was associated with higher, while sweets, and fish and eggs patterns were associated with lower systolic blood pressure. Healthy, sweets, and fish and eggs factors were additionally associated with lower diastolic blood pressure.
Closer adherence to the dietary recommendations, and a diet high in fresh vegetables, fruits and berries, cooked vegetables, fish dishes, and yoghurt may be beneficial for the glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes. Moreover, a diet pattern with fish and eggs may have beneficial effects for blood pressure.
PubMed ID
27105935 View in PubMed
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Association between fruit and vegetable consumption in mothers and children in low-income, urban neighborhoods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166274
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2007 Oct;34(5):723-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Marie-Pierre Sylvestre
Jennifer O'Loughlin
Katherine Gray-Donald
James Hanley
Gilles Paradis
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. marie-pierre.sylvestre@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2007 Oct;34(5):723-34
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Continental Population Groups
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mothers
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Vegetables
Abstract
To understand factors influencing fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption in children, the authors studied the association between F&V consumption in mothers and children in a sample of 1,106 boys and girls in Grades 4-6 in 24 elementary schools in low-income, multiethnic neighborhoods in Montreal, Canada. Approximately 10% of girls and 19% of boys reported not having eaten any vegetables in the week prior to questionnaire administration; 53% of girls and 63% of boys did not consume whole fruits daily. Each unit increase in F&V consumption in mothers was associated with a 10% to 20% increase in F&V consumption in children. Interventions to improve F&V consumption should aim to improve awareness among parents of the importance of fruits and vegetables and of the impact of their own behavior on their children's F&V consumption.
PubMed ID
17142242 View in PubMed
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Food appearances in children's television programmes in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292370
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Nov; 20(16):2920-2926
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Steingerdur Olafsdottir
Christina Berg
Author Affiliation
1School of Education,University of Iceland,Stakkahlid,105 Reykjavik,Iceland.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Nov; 20(16):2920-2926
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - economics
Beverages - economics
Child
Child Behavior
Fast Foods - economics
Food - economics
Fruit - economics
Healthy Diet - economics
Humans
Iceland
Leisure Activities
Public Sector - economics
Television - economics
Vegetables - economics
Abstract
Exposure to advertisements cannot fully explain the associations between young children's dietary intake and the time they spend in front of the television. It is therefore of importance to study television content other than advertisements in this aspect. The present study aimed to examine the nature and extent of verbal and visual appearances of foods and beverages in children's television programmes on Icelandic public service television.
A total of 27 h of children's programmes (domestic and internationally produced) were watched. All verbal and visual appearances of foods and beverages were coded, as well as the context in which the foods/beverages were discussed or appeared.
Children's programmes on Icelandic public service television.
Two food groups were of special interest for their importance from a public health perspective: high-calorie and low-nutrient (HCLN) foods and fruits and vegetables (F&V). The ? 2 test and logistic regression were performed to analyse if the occurrence of the two groups was associated with the context where foods/beverages appeared.
Of the 125 different programmes, a food or beverage appeared in 86 %. Of the total food appearances (n 599), HCLN foods accounted for 26 % and F&V for 23 %. HCLN foods were presented as desirable by appearing more frequently with child characters (P
PubMed ID
28847334 View in PubMed
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Associations of Baltic Sea and Mediterranean dietary patterns with bone mineral density in elderly women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292375
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Oct; 20(15):2735-2743
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Arja T Erkkilä
Homa Sadeghi
Masoud Isanejad
Jaakko Mursu
Marjo Tuppurainen
Heikki Kröger
Author Affiliation
1Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition,University of Eastern Finland,Yliopistonrantra 1C,PO Box 1627,FI70211 Kuopio,Finland.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Oct; 20(15):2735-2743
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged
Animals
Anthropometry
Bone Density
Dairy Products
Diet
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Finland
Fishes
Food Quality
Fruit
Humans
Life Style
Nutrition Assessment
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Seafood
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
Dietary quality in relation to bone health has been analysed in relatively few studies. The current study aimed to assess the association of the Baltic Sea diet (BSD) and the Mediterranean diet (MD) with bone mineral density (BMD) among elderly women.
Lumbar, femoral and total body BMD were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline and year 3. Dietary intake was measured by 3 d food record at baseline. BSD and MD scores were calculated from food and alcohol consumption and nutrient intake. Information on lifestyle, diseases and medications was collected by questionnaires. Longitudinal associations of BSD and MD scores with BMD were analysed using linear mixed models.
Interventional prospective Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Fracture Prevention study including women aged 65-71 years and residing in Kuopio province, Finland.
Women (n 554) with mean age of 67·9 (sd 1·9) years and mean BMI of 28·8 (sd 4·7) kg/m2.
Higher BSD scores were associated with higher intakes of fruit and berries, vegetables, fish and low-fat dairy products, and lower intake of sausage. Higher MD scores were associated with higher consumption of fruit and berries and vegetables. BSD and MD scores were associated with higher PUFA:SFA and higher fibre intake. Femoral, lumbar or total body BMD was not significantly different among the quartiles of BSD or MD score.
The lack of associations suggest that Baltic Sea and Mediterranean dietary patterns may not adequately reflect dietary factors relevant to bone health.
PubMed ID
28803596 View in PubMed
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Assessing validity of a short food frequency questionnaire on present dietary intake of elderly Icelanders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126210
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Tinna Eysteinsdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Author Affiliation
Unit for Nutrition Research, University of Iceland and Landspitali National-University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. tinnaey@landspitali.is
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:12
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Cod Liver Oil
Coffee
Dairy Products
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Iceland
Interviews as Topic
Male
Meat
Nutrition Assessment
Questionnaires - standards
Sex Factors
Tea
Vegetables
Abstract
Few studies exist on the validity of food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) administered to elderly people. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of a short FFQ on present dietary intake, developed specially for the AGES-Reykjavik Study, which includes 5,764 elderly individuals. Assessing the validity of FFQs is essential before they are used in studies on diet-related disease risk and health outcomes.
128 healthy elderly participants (74 y ± 5.7; 58.6% female) answered the AGES-FFQ, and subsequently filled out a 3-day weighed food record. Validity of the AGES-FFQ was assessed by comparing its answers to the dietary data obtained from the weighed food records, using Spearman's rank correlation, Chi-Square/Kendall's tau, and a Jonckheere-Terpstra test for trend.
For men a correlation = 0.4 was found for potatoes, fresh fruits, oatmeal/muesli, cakes/cookies, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee, tea and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.40-0.71). A lower, but acceptable, correlation was also found for raw vegetables (r = 0.33). The highest correlation for women was found for consumption of rye bread, oatmeal/muesli, raw vegetables, candy, dairy products, milk, pure fruit juice, cod liver oil, coffee and tea (r = 0.40-0.61). An acceptable correlation was also found for fish topping/salad, fresh fruit, blood/liver sausage, whole-wheat bread, and sugar in coffee/tea (r = 0.28-0.37). Questions on meat/fish meals, cooked vegetables and soft drinks did not show a significant correlation to the reference method. Pearson Chi-Square and Kendall's tau showed similar results, as did the Jonckheere-Terpstra trend test.
A majority of the questions in the AGES-FFQ had an acceptable correlation and may be used to rank individuals according to their level of intake of several important foods/food groups. The AGES-FFQ on present diet may therefore be used to study the relationship between consumption of several specific foods/food groups and various health-related endpoints gathered in the AGES-Reykjavik Study.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22413931 View in PubMed
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The Boost study: design of a school- and community-based randomised trial to promote fruit and vegetable consumption among teenagers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126212
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:191
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Rikke Krølner
Thea Suldrup Jørgensen
Anne Kristine Aarestrup
Anne Hjøllund Christiansen
Anne Maj Christensen
Pernille Due
Author Affiliation
Centre for Intervention Research in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, University of Southern Denmark, National Institute of Public Health, Øster Farimagsgade, Copenhagen K, Denmark. rkr@niph.dk
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:191
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Community Networks
Cooperative Behavior
Data Collection
Denmark
Food Habits
Fruit - supply & distribution
Health promotion
Humans
Schools
Vegetables - supply & distribution
Abstract
The aim of the Boost study was to produce a persistent increase in fruit and vegetable consumption among 13-year-olds. This paper describes the development, implementation and evaluation of a school-and community-based, multi-component intervention guided by theory, evidence, and best practice.
We used the Intervention Mapping protocol to guide the development of the intervention. Programme activities combined environmental and educational strategies and focused on increasing access to fruit and vegetables in three settings: School: Daily provision of free fruit and vegetables; a pleasant eating environment; classroom curricular activities; individually computer tailored messages; one-day-workshop for teachers. Families: school meeting; guided child-parent activities; newsletters. Local community: guided visits in grocery stores and local area as part of classroom curriculum; information sheets to sports-and youth clubs.The Boost study employed a cluster-randomised controlled study design and applied simple two-stage cluster sampling: A random sample of 10 municipalities followed by a random sample of 4 schools within each municipality (N = 40 schools). Schools were randomised into a total of 20 intervention-and 20 control schools. We included all year 7 pupils except those from school classes with special needs. Timeline: Baseline survey: August 2010. Delivery of intervention: September 2010-May 2011. First follow-up survey: May/June 2011. Second follow-up survey: May/June 2012.
Daily mean intake of fruit and vegetables and habitual fruit and vegetable intake measured by validated 24-hour recall-and food frequency questionnaires.
determinants of fruit and vegetable intake, positive side-effects and unintended adverse effects. Implementation was monitored by thorough process evaluation.
The baseline data file included 2,156 adolescents (95%). There was baseline equivalence between intervention-and control groups for sociodemographics, primary outcomes, and availability at home, school and sports-and youth clubs. Significantly larger proportions of pupils in the control group had parents born in Denmark. The study will provide insights into effective strategies to increase fruit and vegetable intake among teenagers. The study will gain knowledge on implementation processes, intervention effects in population subgroups with low intake, and opportunities for including local communities in interventions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22413782 View in PubMed
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[Determinants of the intention of post-secondary students to eat at least five servings of vegetables and fruit daily].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126475
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 2012 Apr;60(2):109-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
D. Boucher
C. Gagné
F. Côté
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Québec, Canada. Danielle_boucher01@uqar.ca
Source
Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique. 2012 Apr;60(2):109-19
Date
Apr-2012
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Eating - psychology
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Intention
Logistic Models
Male
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Students - psychology
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
Vegetable and fruit consumption helps reduce the occurrence of overweight, obesity, and other chronic diseases. However, only 50% of young adults eat at least five servings of these foods daily. Based on the construct of the Theory of planned behaviour of Ajzen (1991) to which other constructs were added (descriptive norm, perceived regularity of the behaviour and past behaviour), this study aims at identifying the determinants in the intention of young adults in postsecondary education institutions to eat at least five servings of vegetables and fruit daily during the next three months.
A sample of 385 students in two CEGEP (junior college institutions) in the Quebec City area participated in this correlation study on a volunteer basis. While attending class, they completed a self-administered questionnaire.
Hierarchical regression analyses showed that perceived behavioural controls and the perceived weight of facilitating factors and barriers to the behaviour, explained 75% of the intention variance. Another 4% was explained when the perceived regularity of the behaviour, the descriptive norm, and past-behaviour, were added to the analysis. Logistic regression analyses show that individuals presenting weak/strong intention can be differentiated among themselves as to the perception of benefits derived from a daily consumption of vegetables and fruit (such as maintaining good health, eating foods that taste good), and as to facilitating factors/barriers that assist or inhibit such consumption (possessing more information on the nutritional value and taste of vegetables and fruit, or disposing of sufficient time to prepare them).
To our knowledge, this is the first study done in Quebec using a recognized theoretical model to identify the determinants of the intention to eat at least five servings of vegetables and fruit daily in a sample of young adults in postsecondary education institutions. The results may be helpful in designing the contents of interventions aimed at maintaining and increasing daily consumption of vegetables and fruit by young adults.
PubMed ID
22386104 View in PubMed
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