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Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of bladder cancer: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92177
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Sep;17(9):2519-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Andersson Swen-Olof
Johansson Jan-Erik
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Sep;17(9):2519-22
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Fruit and vegetable consumption has been inconsistently associated with risk of bladder cancer. We used data from a prospective population-based cohort study of 82,002 Swedish women and men to examine the association between fruit and vegetable consumption and bladder cancer incidence. Diet was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. During a mean follow-up of 9.4 years, 485 incident cases of bladder cancer were identified in the Swedish cancer registries. We found no statistically significant association between intakes of total fruits and vegetables, total fruits, or total vegetables and bladder cancer risk after adjustment for age, sex, education, and cigarette smoking. The multivariate rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) comparing the highest with the lowest quartile of intake were 0.80 (0.60-1.05) for total fruits and vegetables, 0.93 (0.69-1.25) for fruits, and 0.89 (0.67-1.19) for vegetables. Likewise, no associations were observed for citrus fruits, cruciferous vegetables, or green leafy vegetables. The associations did not differ by sex or smoking status. In conclusion, findings from this prospective study suggest that fruit and vegetable intakes are not likely to be appreciably associated with the risk of bladder cancer.
PubMed ID
18768526 View in PubMed
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Low intake of fruits, berries and vegetables is associated with excess mortality in men: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187153
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jan;133(1):199-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Tiina H Rissanen
Sari Voutilainen
Jyrki K Virtanen
Birgitta Venho
Meri Vanharanta
Jaakko Mursu
Jukka T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jan;133(1):199-204
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Diet
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Diets rich in fruits and vegetables have been of interest because of their potential health benefits against chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. The aim of this work was to assess the association of the dietary intake of a food group that includes fruits, berries and vegetables with all-cause, CVD-related and non-CVD-related mortality. The subjects were Finnish men aged 42-60 y examined in 1984-1989 in the prospective Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) Study. Dietary intakes were assessed by 4-d food intake record during the baseline phase of the KIHD Study. The risk of all-cause and non-CVD-related deaths was studied in 2641 men and the risk of CVD-related death in 1950 men who had no history of CVD at baseline. During a mean follow-up time of 12.8 y, cardiovascular as well as noncardiovascular and all-cause mortality were lower among men with the highest consumption of fruits, berries and vegetables. After adjustment for the major CVD risk factors, the relative risk for men in the highest fifth of fruit, berry and vegetable intake for all-cause death, CVD-related and non-CVD-related death was 0.66 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-0.88], 0.59 (0.33-1.06), and 0.68 (0.46-1.00), respectively, compared with men in the lowest fifth. These data show that a high fruit, berry and vegetable intake is associated with reduced risk of mortality in middle-aged Finnish men. Consequently, the findings of this work indicate that diets that are rich in plant-derived foods can promote longevity.
PubMed ID
12514290 View in PubMed
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Association between fruit and vegetable consumption and birth weight: a prospective study among 43,585 Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79617
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(6):616-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Mikkelsen Tina B
Osler Merete
Orozova-Bekkevold Ivanka
Knudsen Vibeke K
Olsen Sjurdur F
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. tbs@ssi.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(6):616-22
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Interviews
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether fruit and vegetable consumption in pregnancy is associated with birth weight in a Western population. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study based on telephone interviews, a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), and extractions of birth characteristics from national health registries. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: The 43,585 Danish women from the Danish National Birth Cohort who had completed the FFQ in mid-pregnancy and on whom information about birth outcome was available. The exposures were frequency of green leafy vegetable (GLV) intake and quantified intake of fruit, fruit and vegetables, and fruit and vegetables and juice. The outcomes were birth weight and z-score for expected birth weight adjusted for sex and gestation week. Information on maternal height, weight, smoking, and other potential confounders was obtained through telephone interviews. RESULTS: Significant associations were found for all exposures to fruit and vegetable intake with birth weight and most with z-score. The strongest association was found for fruit intake in which case birth weight increased by 10.7 g (95% CI 7.3-14.2) per quintile. All associations were stronger among lean women (BMI
PubMed ID
17132595 View in PubMed
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Protective effect of fruits and vegetables on stomach cancer in a cohort of Swedish twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21716
Source
Int J Cancer. 1998 Mar 30;76(1):35-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-1998
Author
P. Terry
O. Nyrén
J. Yuen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. pdt1@Columbia.edu
Source
Int J Cancer. 1998 Mar 30;76(1):35-7
Date
Mar-30-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Diet
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Smoking - adverse effects
Stomach Neoplasms - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Observational studies, primarily of a case-control design, have shown an inverse association of fruit and vegetable consumption with the risk of stomach cancer, a finding tentatively attributed to anti-oxidant vitamins. Ensuing randomized-intervention trials of these vitamins, however, have been mostly negative. Therefore, the seemingly protective effect of fruit and vegetables in case-control studies is suspected to be influenced by the information bias inherent in the retrospective assessment of exposure, particularly since pre-conceptions about the wholesome effects of these foods are common among the public. Our aim was to examine the association of fruit and vegetable intake with the risk of stomach cancer in a prospective cohort study. Fruit and vegetable consumption was assessed in 1967 in 11,546 individuals in the Swedish Twin Registry, along with a wide range of potentially confounding factors. Complete follow-up through 1992 was attained through record linkage to the National Cancer and Death Registers. The relative risk of stomach cancer was estimated in proportional hazards models, with confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for correlated outcomes. The risk of stomach cancer was inversely related to fruit and vegetable consumption. Controlling for potentially confounding factors, the relative risk among subjects with the lowest compared to those with the highest intake was 5.5 (95% CI 1.7-18.3) with a statistically significant dose-risk trend (p
PubMed ID
9533759 View in PubMed
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Does high intake of fruit and vegetables improve lung cancer survival?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82784
Source
Lung Cancer. 2006 Mar;51(3):267-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Skuladottir Halla
Tjoenneland Anne
Overvad Kim
Stripp Connie
Olsen Jørgen H
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. halla@cancer.dk
Source
Lung Cancer. 2006 Mar;51(3):267-73
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - diet therapy - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Vegetables
Abstract
The objective of the study was to examine the prognostic effect of dietary intake of fruit and vegetables on lung cancer patients. We used data on 57,053 participants in the Danish prospective cohort study, 'Diet, Cancer and Health'. Patients in whom lung cancer was diagnosed constituted the final study cohort and were followed from the date of diagnosis until the date of death or 11 March 2004. A total of 353 participants had lung cancer. Increasing levels of intake of fruit and vegetables show a tendency toward decreased hazard of dying: the Cox proportional hazard model estimated a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.84 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.59-1.21) for high intake of vegetables by current smokers and an HR of 0.81 (95% CI, 0.58-1.15) for high intake of fruits with low intake as the reference. In contrast, high intake of potatoes increased the hazard of dying (HR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.12-2.23). Our study suggests that high intake of fruit and vegetables might have a favourable effect on the prognosis of lung cancer patients, but a high intake of potatoes appears to increase the hazard of dying.
PubMed ID
16469411 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer risk: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82746
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Feb;15(2):301-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Håkansson Niclas
Näslund Ingmar
Bergkvist Leif
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Feb;15(2):301-5
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brassica
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
High consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a lower risk of pancreatic cancer in many case-control studies. However, cohort studies on this relationship are limited and do not support an association. We examined the associations of overall consumption of fruits and vegetables and consumption of certain subgroups of fruits and vegetables with the incidence of pancreatic cancer among 81,922 women and men in the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. During an average follow-up of 6.8 years (1998-2004), 135 incident pancreatic cancer cases were diagnosed. After adjustment for age and other risk factors for pancreatic cancer, the HRs for the highest compared with the lowest category of intake were 1.13 (95% CI, 0.66-1.94) for total fruits and vegetables, 1.10 (95% CI, 0.64-1.88) for total fruits, and 1.08 (95% CI, 0.63-1.85) for total vegetables. Among specific subgroups of fruits and vegetables, a nonsignificant inverse association was observed with cruciferous vegetable consumption (> or = 3 servings/wk versus or = 1 serving/wk versus never consumption: HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.39-0.99). Findings from this prospective study do not support a relationship of overall fruit and vegetable consumption with pancreatic cancer risk. The association between consumption of cruciferous vegetables and pancreatic cancer risk warrants further investigation.
PubMed ID
16492919 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable intake and rate of heart failure: a population-based prospective cohort of women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266309
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2015 Jan;17(1):20-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Susanne Rautiainen
Emily B Levitan
Murray A Mittleman
Alicja Wolk
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2015 Jan;17(1):20-6
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fruit
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Although numerous studies have investigated fruit and vegetable consumption in association with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) such as coronary heart disease and stroke, a limited number of studies have investigated the association with heart failure. The aim of this study was to assess the association between fruit and vegetable intake and the incidence of heart failure among women.
In September 1997, a total of 34,319 women (aged 49-83 years) from the Swedish Mammography Cohort, free of cancer and CVD at baseline, completed a food-frequency questionnaire. Women were followed for incident heart failure (diagnosis as primary or secondary cause) through December 2011 using administrative health registries. Over 12.9?years of follow-up (442,348 person-years), we identified 3051 incident cases of heart failure. Total fruit and vegetable consumption was inversely associated with the rate of heart failure {the multivariable-adjusted rate ratio (RR) in the highest quintile compared with the lowest was 0.80 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70-0.90]}. Fruit (mutually adjusted for vegetables) were not significantly associated with rate of heart failure (RR 0.94; 95% CI 0.83-1.07), whereas vegetables showed an inverse association (RR 0.83; 95% CI 0.73-0.95). When investigating the shape of association, we found evidence of a non-linear association (P = 0.01), and the lowest rates of heart failure were observed among women consuming =5 servings/day of fruit and vegetables, without further decrease with increasing intake.
In this population-based prospective cohort study of women, higher total consumption of fruit and vegetables was inversely associated with the incidence of heart failure.
PubMed ID
25382356 View in PubMed
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Relative validity and reproducibility of a parent-administered semi-quantitative FFQ for assessing food intake in Danish children aged 3-9 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279464
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2016 May;19(7):1184-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Tine Buch-Andersen
Federico J A Pérez-Cueto
Ulla Toft
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2016 May;19(7):1184-94
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbonated Beverages
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Diet
Diet Surveys - standards
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Abstract
To assess the relative validity and reproducibility of the semi-quantitative FFQ (SFFQ) applied in the evaluation of a community intervention study, SoL-Bornholm, for estimating food intakes.
The reference measure was a 4 d estimated food record. The SFFQ was completed two times separated by a 1-month period in order to test reproducibility.
The Capital Region and the Regional Municipality of Bornholm, Denmark.
A total of fifty-four children aged 3-9 years were enrolled in the study.
In terms of validity, the SFFQ generally overestimated intakes compared with the food records, especially for vegetables. For most intakes, the mean difference increased with increasing intake. Gross misclassification was on average higher for energy and nutrients (17%) than for foods (8%). Spearman correlation coefficients were significant for twelve out of fourteen intakes, ranging from 0·29 to 0·63 for foods and from 0·12 to 0·48 for energy and nutrients. Comparing the repeated SFFQ administrations, the intakes of the first SFFQ were slightly higher than those of the second SFFQ. Gross misclassification was low for most intakes; on average 6% for foods and 8% for energy and nutrients. Intra-class correlations were significant for all intakes, ranging from 0·30 to 0·82 for foods and from 0·46 to 0·81 for energy and nutrients.
The results indicate that the SFFQ gives reproducible estimates. The relative validity of the SFFQ was low to moderate for most intakes but comparable to other studies among children.
PubMed ID
26434501 View in PubMed
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Diet and cancer prevention: Contributions from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100405
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Sep;46(14):2555-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Carlos A Gonzalez
Elio Riboli
Author Affiliation
Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Programme of Epidemilogical Cancer Research, Institut Català d'Oncologia, Av. Gran Via s/n, km 2.7, 08907 L'Hospitalet, Barcelona, Spain. cagonzalez@iconcologia.net
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Sep;46(14):2555-62
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fiber
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Food - statistics & numerical data
Fruit
Humans
Male
Meat products
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Vegetables
Abstract
We present the main findings observed to date from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) on dietary factors associated with the most frequent cancer sites. METHODS: EPIC is a multicentre prospective study carried out in 23 centres in 10 European countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom, including 519,978 participants (366,521 women and 153,457 men), most aged 35-70 years. RESULTS: We observed the following significant associations: gastric cancer risk was inversely associated with high plasma vitamin C, some carotenoids, retinol and a-tocopherol, high intake of cereal fibre and high adhesion to Mediterranean diet, while red and processed meat were associated with increased risk. High intake of dietary fibre, fish, calcium, and plasma vitamin D were associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer, while red and processed meat intake, alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity were associated with an increased risk. High intake of fruit and vegetables in current smokers were associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer. An increased risk of breast cancer was associated with high saturated fat intake and alcohol intake. In postmenopausal women, BMI was positively and physical activity negatively associated with breast cancer risk. High intake of dairy protein and calcium from dairy products and high serum concentration of IGF-I were associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. These results contribute to scientific evidence for appropriate public health strategies and prevention activities aimed at reducing the global cancer burden.
PubMed ID
20843485 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause mortality: a dose-response analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112745
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Aug;98(2):454-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Andrea Bellavia
Susanna C Larsson
Matteo Bottai
Alicja Wolk
Nicola Orsini
Author Affiliation
Units of Nutritional Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Aug;98(2):454-9
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Nutrition Assessment
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
The association between fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption and overall mortality has seldom been investigated in large cohort studies. Findings from the few available studies are inconsistent.
The objective was to examine the dose-response relation between FV consumption and mortality, in terms of both time and rate, in a large prospective cohort of Swedish men and women.
FV consumption was assessed through a self-administrated questionnaire in a population-based cohort of 71,706 participants (38,221 men and 33,485 women) aged 45-83 y. We performed a dose-response analysis to evaluate 10th survival percentile differences (PDs) by using Laplace regression and estimated HRs by using Cox regression.
During 13 y of follow-up, 11,439 deaths (6803 men and 4636 women) occurred in the cohort. In comparison with 5 servings FV/d, a lower consumption was progressively associated with shorter survival and higher mortality rates. Those who never consumed FV lived 3 y shorter (PD: -37 mo; 95% CI: -58, -16 mo) and had a 53% higher mortality rate (HR: 1.53; 95% CI: 1.19, 1.99) than did those who consumed 5 servings FV/d. Consideration of fruit and vegetables separately showed that those who never consumed fruit lived 19 mo shorter (PD: -19 mo; 95% CI: -29, -10 mo) than did those who ate 1 fruit/d. Participants who consumed 3 vegetables/d lived 32 mo longer than did those who never consumed vegetables (PD: 32 mo; 96% CI: 13, 51 mo).
FV consumption
PubMed ID
23803880 View in PubMed
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63 records – page 1 of 7.