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The Grocery Store Food Environment in Northern Greenland and Its Implications for the Health of Reproductive Age Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297964
Source
J Community Health. 2018 02; 43(1):175-185
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
02-2018
Author
Zoe A Watson
Carmen Byker Shanks
Mary P Miles
Elizabeth Rink
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Human Development, Montana State University, P.O. Box 173540, Bozeman, MT, 59717-3540, USA. zoealvira.watson@gmail.com.
Source
J Community Health. 2018 02; 43(1):175-185
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Adult
Female
Food Supply
Fruit
Greenland
Humans
Nutrition Policy
Vegetables
Women's health
Abstract
The population of Greenland is diminishing and environmental and social shifts implicate food availability and the health of reproductive age women. There is little knowledge of the grocery store food environment in Greenland. To address this gap and provide baseline information the present study measured food availability in five grocery stores in northern Greenland. As well, 15 interviews were conducted with reproductive age women, three grocery store managers were interviewed and one interview was conducted with a food distribution manager. Results show few fresh fruits and vegetables are available in grocery stores and in some stores no fresh foods are available. In Kullorsuaq, the primary location for this study, the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey in Stores score in spring 2016 was (3/30) and the Freedman Grocery Store Survey Score was (11/49). Interview results highlight a need to increase communication within the food system and to tailor food distribution policies to the Arctic context with longer term planning protocols for food distribution. These findings can be used to inform future food store environment research in Greenland and for informing policies that improve healthful food availability in grocery stores in northern Greenland.
PubMed ID
28689340 View in PubMed
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Dietary changes in Finland--success stories and future challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182675
Source
Appetite. 2003 Dec;41(3):245-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Ritva Prättälä
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute (KTL), Mannerheimintie 166, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland. ritva.prattala@ktl.fi
Source
Appetite. 2003 Dec;41(3):245-9
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Finland
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Nutrition Policy
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
The paper describes dietary changes and related nutrition policies and interventions in Finland since the 1960s. Dietary changes are interpreted from the lifestyle perspective, in which food consumption patterns are assumed to be formed by the interplay of individual choices and structural chances, such as socioeconomic and cultural conditions. Finland can demonstrate a success story when it comes to decreased use of dairy fats and increased use of vegetables and fruit. However, the prevalence of overweight has increased. Nutrition policies and interventions together with sociocultural factors have supported the shift towards healthy nutrition. The same factors have promoted overweight, as well.
PubMed ID
14637322 View in PubMed
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[Intake of fruit and vegetables among Norwegian children and adolescents]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30286
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 May 20;124(10):1396-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-2004
Author
Lene Frost Andersen
Nina Øverby
Inger Therese L Lillegaard
Author Affiliation
Institutt for ernaeringsforskning, Universitetet i Oslo, Postboks 1046 Blindern, 0316 Oslo. l.f.andersen@basalmed.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 May 20;124(10):1396-8
Date
May-20-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
English Abstract
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Norway
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We present a survey of the intake of fruit and vegetables among Norwegian children and adolescents and examine the association between fruit and vegetable intake and intake of macronutrients and micronutrients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 2000 and 2001, a nationwide dietary survey using four-days records was conducted among four-year-olds and students in the fourth and eighth grades (UNGKOST-2000). RESULTS: The average intake of fruit and vegetables was nearly 250 gram per day, increasing with age. The percentages of children eating more than 500 gram fruit and vegetables per day were 5% among the four-year-olds, 7% among fourth-graders, and 11% among eighth-graders. A positive association was observed between intake of fruit and vegetables and intake of fibre and all micronutrients, while a negative association was found between fruit and vegetable intake and percentage of energy coming from added sugar and saturated fatty acids. INTERPRETATION: The study shows that children and adolescents have less than half the recommended intake of fruit and vegetables. Furthermore, higher intake of fruit and vegetables is associated with higher dietary quality.
PubMed ID
15195180 View in PubMed
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Dietary guidelines and patterns of intake in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61784
Source
Br J Nutr. 1999 Apr;81 Suppl 2:S43-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
J. Haraldsdóttir
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Copenhagen, Denmark. jha@kvl.dk
Source
Br J Nutr. 1999 Apr;81 Suppl 2:S43-8
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Vegetables
Abstract
Food-based dietary guidelines in Denmark have usually been expressed in simple terms only and need to be elaborated. Quantitative recommendations on fruit and vegetable intake were issued in 1998, recommending 600 g/d (potatoes not included). This paper is based on a national dietary survey in 1995 (n = 3098, age range 1-80 years) supplemented with data from a simple frequency survey in 1995 (n = 1007, age range 15-80 years) and from the first national survey in 1985 (n = 2242, age range 15-80 years). Only data on adults are included in this paper. Fat intake, saturated fat in particular, is too high (median intake 37 %energy and 16 %energy, respectively). Main fat sources are separated fats (butter, margarine, oil, etc.: 40%), meat (18%), and dairy products (21%). Total fat intake decreased from 1985 to 1995 but fatty acid composition did not improve. Dietary fibre intake is from 18 to 22 g/d (women and men, respectively) with 62% from cereals, 24% from vegetables and 12% from fruit. Mean intake of vegetables and potatoes was from 200 to 250 g/d (women and men, respectively). Mean intake of fruit and vegetables (potatoes not included) was 277 g/d, or less than half of the new recommendation (600 g/d). Only 15% of participants in the frequency survey reported consuming both fruit and vegetables every day, and only 28% reported to do so almost every day. In conclusion, dietary intake in Denmark is characterized by a high intake of saturated fat and total fat, and by a relatively low intake of fruit and vegetables.
PubMed ID
10999025 View in PubMed
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Improving the comparability of national estimates of fruit and vegetable consumption for cross-national studies of dietary patterns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116186
Source
Food Nutr Bull. 2012 Dec;33(4):312-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Spencer Moore
Beate Lloyd
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, 28 Division Street, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N7, Canada. mooresp@queensu.ca
Source
Food Nutr Bull. 2012 Dec;33(4):312-7
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diet
Fabaceae
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Great Britain
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Internationality
Male
Nutrition Policy
Solanum tuberosum
United States
Vegetables
Abstract
Developing global approaches to the problem of low fruit and vegetable consumption requires cross-nationally comparable estimates of fruit and vegetable consumption. National differences in the definitions of fruits and vegetables and serving size amounts limit the comparability of estimates.
To describe national differences in fruit and vegetable definitions, serving size amounts, and how these factors can influence the comparability of fruit and vegetable consumption estimates; and to provide a series of reporting recommendations that could facilitate cross-national studies of fruit and vegetable consumption.
A comprehensive review of national dietary guidelines, fruit and vegetable definitions, and fruit and vegetable consumption recommendations was undertaken for Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom.
To improve cross-national comparability, the findings suggest that researchers could report fruit and vegetable consumption separately, provide separate average fruit and vegetable intake amounts, report potato and legume or pulse consumption separately from vegetable consumption, and report consumption of 100% fruit juice separately from fruit consumption.
These four low-cost, high-value additions to conventional research reporting standards will aid in the development of cross-national research on global fruit and vegetable consumption and the design of global policies that can target low fruit and vegetable consumption in populations.
PubMed ID
23424898 View in PubMed
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A workplace feasibility study of the effect of a minimal fruit intervention on fruit intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138771
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Aug;14(8):1382-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Sevil Alinia
Anne D Lassen
Kirstine S Krogholm
Tue Christensen
Ole H Hels
Inge Tetens
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, DK-2860 Søborg, Denmark. seva@food.dtu.dk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Aug;14(8):1382-7
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consumer Satisfaction
Denmark
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Vegetables
Workplace
Abstract
The main purpose of the study was to investigate the feasibility of using workplaces to increase the fruit consumption of participants by increasing fruit availability and accessibility by a minimal fruit programme. Furthermore, it was investigated whether a potential increase in fruit intake would affect vegetable, total energy and nutrient intake.
A 5-month, controlled, workplace study where workplaces were divided into an intervention group (IG) and a control group (CG). At least one piece of free fruit was available per person per day in the IG. Total fruit and dietary intake was assessed, using two 24 h dietary recalls at baseline and at endpoint.
Eight Danish workplaces were enrolled in the study. Five workplaces were in the IG and three were in the CG.
One hundred and twenty-four (IG, n 68; CG, n 56) healthy, mainly normal-weight participants were recruited.
Mean daily fruit intake increased significantly from baseline to endpoint only in the IG by 112(se 35) g. In the IG, mean daily intake of added sugar decreased significantly by 10·7(se 4·4) g, whereas mean daily intake of dietary fibre increased significantly by 3·0(se 1·1) g. Vegetable, total energy and macronutrient intake remained unchanged through the intervention period for both groups.
The present study showed that it is feasible to increase the average fruit intake at workplaces by simply increasing fruit availability and accessibility. Increased fruit intake possibly substituted intake of foods containing added sugar. In this study population the increased fruit intake did not affect total energy intake.
PubMed ID
21138609 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable intake of mothers of 11-year-old children in nine European countries: The Pro Children Cross-sectional Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29550
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
Alexandra Wolf
Agneta Yngve
Ibrahim Elmadfa
Eric Poortvliet
Bettina Ehrenblad
Carmen Pérez-Rodrigo
Inga Thórsdóttir
Jóhanna Haraldsdóttir
Johannes Brug
Lea Maes
Maria Daniel Vaz de Almeida
Rikke Krølner
Knut-Inge Klepp
Author Affiliation
Institute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):246-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Recall
Mothers
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare fruit and vegetable intakes of mothers of 11-year-old children across Europe. METHODS: Cross-sectional surveys were carried out in 9 European countries in October/November 2003. Self-administered questionnaires assessing fruit and vegetable consumption were used for data collection. The current paper presents dietary intake data obtained by a precoded 24-hour recall and a food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: The consumption levels of fruit and vegetables (without fruit juice) were in line with World Health Organization recommendations of > or =400 g/day for only 27% of all participating mothers. Based on both instruments, the Pro Children results showed comparatively high average fruit intake levels in Portugal, Denmark and Sweden (211, 203 and 194 g/day) and the lowest intake in Iceland (97 g/day). High vegetable intake levels were found in Portugal and Belgium (169 and 150 g/day), the lowest in Spain (88 g/day). A south-north gradient could not be observed in the Pro Children study. CONCLUSION: Fruit and vegetable intakes are low in mothers of 11-year-olds across Europe. Especially vegetable consumption can be regarded as marginal in most of the studied European countries. A high percentage of mothers indicated to eat fruit and vegetables less than once a day. The results have shown that national and international interventions are necessary to promote fruit and especially vegetable consumption in the European population of mothers.
PubMed ID
16088088 View in PubMed
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Food consumption patterns in elementary school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155252
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2008;69(3):152-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Tina Moffat
Tracey Galloway
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2008;69(3):152-4
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences - psychology
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Ontario
Schools
Students - psychology
Vegetables
Abstract
Food consumption was investigated in children attending three elementary schools in urban Hamilton, Ontario.
Dietary data were collected from 92 children in grades 2 to 4 through 24-hour dietary recalls (39% participation rate). Servings of four food groups were compared with recommended daily servings in Canada's Food Guide.
The majority of students did not consume the recommended five daily servings of vegetables and fruit. On average, they consumed a high number of servings of "other foods," which were not included in the four food groups. More than 50% of the students did not consume the recommended daily servings of milk products, and only a small proportion (21%) drank milk during school lunch.
We recommend that primary school educators promote the consumption of vegetables and fruits and milk products at school, either through healthy snack programs or educational programs.
PubMed ID
18783641 View in PubMed
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Evaluating the potential health gain of the World Health Organization's recommendation concerning vegetable and fruit consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18070
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2003 Dec;6(8):765-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Kurt Hoffmann
Heiner Boeing
Jean-Luc Volatier
Wulf Becker
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, D-14558 Bergholz-Rehbrücke, Germany.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2003 Dec;6(8):765-72
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet Surveys
France - epidemiology
Fruit
Health Promotion - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nutrition Policy
Probability
Risk Assessment - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
World Health Organization
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a daily intake of at least 400 g of vegetables and fruit. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the public health benefit of meeting this WHO recommendation by applying a statistical method that combines estimated intake distributions and simulated intake changes. DESIGN AND SETTING: The benefit of an increased consumption of vegetables and fruit was quantified by the preventable proportion of diseases. This proportion was estimated by a general formula derived in the paper that incorporates individual relative risks. Three different strategies of increasing usual intake were simulated and compared. The first strategy assumes that all individuals increase their intake by the same amount, the second assumes a constant increase among low consumers, and the third simulates individual increments necessary to meet the WHO recommendation. Calculations were made for three different scenarios with varying relative risks. RESULTS: The third simulation strategy turned out to be the most appropriate one to quantify the potential health gain of the current dietary recommendation. Applying this strategy to prevent cancer, the proportion of preventable cases was country-specific. Estimates for France and Sweden were 21.9% and 19.3%, respectively, which are somewhat lower than the non-specific figure published by the World Cancer Research Fund. CONCLUSIONS: To improve estimates of the preventable proportion of diseases, the estimation formula presented here can be applied. Its application requires intake data to estimate the initial intake distribution in the population and to simulate adequate dietary changes.
PubMed ID
14641947 View in PubMed
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Food habits of Canadians: comparison of intakes in adults and adolescents to Canada's food guide to healthy eating.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193551
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2001;62(2):61-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
L J Starkey
L. Johnson-Down
K. Gray-Donald
Author Affiliation
School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, McGill University, QC.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2001;62(2):61-9
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Dairy Products
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Meat
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Vegetables
Abstract
Over 25 years have elapsed since national food and nutrient intake data became available in Canada. Our goal was to describe present dietary intakes based on sociodemographic and 24-hour recall dietary interviews with adults and adolescents from households across the country. Within a multistage, stratified random sample of 80 enumeration areas, 1,543 randomly selected adults (aged 18-65) were enrolled in the study; 178 adolescents within the sampled households also participated. A comparison of food intake with Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating indicated that only males aged 13-34 met the minimum recommended intake levels for all four food groups. Mean milk products intake was below the minimum recommended level for all age groups of females and for men aged 35-65 years. Adolescent girls had low intakes of meat and alternatives. Daily grain product intakes were below five servings for women aged 50-65, as were vegetable and fruit intakes for women aged 18-40. Food choices from the "other foods" group contributed over 25% of energy and fat intake for all age and gender groups. These up-to-date data will be useful to dietitians, nutrition researchers, industry, and government in their efforts to promote Canadians' continued progress toward meeting food intake recommendations.
PubMed ID
11518556 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.