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Polyphenol-rich juices reduce blood pressure measures in a randomised controlled trial in high normal and hypertensive volunteers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268721
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Oct 14;114(7):1054-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-14-2015
Author
Torunn Elisabeth Tjelle
Linda Holtung
Siv Kjølsrud Bøhn
Kjersti Aaby
Magne Thoresen
Siv Åshild Wiik
Ingvild Paur
Anette Solli Karlsen
Kjetil Retterstøl
Per Ole Iversen
Rune Blomhoff
Source
Br J Nutr. 2015 Oct 14;114(7):1054-63
Date
Oct-14-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Double-Blind Method
Female
Fruit - chemistry
Fruit and Vegetable Juices - analysis
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Photinia - chemistry
Polyphenols - pharmacology
Prunus - chemistry
Vaccinium myrtillus - chemistry
Vitis - chemistry
Abstract
Intake of fruits and berries may lower blood pressure (BP), most probably due to the high content of polyphenols. In the present study, we tested whether consumption of two polyphenol-rich juices could lower BP. In a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial of 12 weeks, 134 healthy individuals, aged 50-70 years, with high normal range BP (130/85-139/89 mmHg, seventy-two subjects) or stage 1-2 hypertension (140/90-179/109 mmHg, sixty-two subjects), were included. They consumed 500 ml/d of one of either (1) a commercially available polyphenol-rich juice based on red grapes, cherries, chokeberries and bilberries; (2) a juice similar to (1) but enriched with polyphenol-rich extracts from blackcurrant press-residue or (3) a placebo juice (polyphenol contents 245·5, 305·2 and 76 mg/100 g, respectively). Resting BP was measured three times, with a 1 min interval, at baseline and after 6 and 12 weeks of intervention. Systolic BP significantly reduced over time (6 and 12 weeks, respectively) in the pooled juice group compared with the placebo group in the first of the three measurements, both for the whole study group (6·9 and 3·4 mmHg; P= 0·01) and even more pronounced in the hypertensive subjects when analysed separately (7·3 and 6·8 mmHg; P= 0·04). The variation in the BP measurements was significantly reduced in the pooled juice group compared with the placebo group (1·4 and 1·7 mmHg; P= 0·03). In conclusion, the present findings suggest that polyphenol-rich berry juice may contribute to a BP- and BP variability lowering effect, being more pronounced in hypertensive than in normotensive subjects.
PubMed ID
26227795 View in PubMed
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Brassica vegetables and breast cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19710
Source
JAMA. 2001 Jun 20;285(23):2975-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-2001
Author
P. Terry
A. Wolk
I. Persson
C. Magnusson
Source
JAMA. 2001 Jun 20;285(23):2975-7
Date
Jun-20-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Brassica
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: JAMA. 2001 Feb 14;285(6):769-7611176915
Comment On: JAMA. 2001 Feb 14;285(6):799-80111176919
PubMed ID
11410091 View in PubMed
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The association of income with fresh fruit and vegetable consumption at different levels of education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145988
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar;64(3):324-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
T. Lallukka
J. Pitkäniemi
O. Rahkonen
E. Roos
M. Laaksonen
E. Lahelma
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. tea.lallukka@helsinki.fi
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar;64(3):324-7
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet Surveys
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Fruit - economics
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Vegetables - economics
Abstract
This study examined whether the association of household income with fresh fruit and vegetable consumption varies by the level of education. Data were derived from mail surveys carried out during 2000-2002 among 40- to 60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki (n=8960, response rate 67%). Education was categorized into three levels, and the household income was divided into quartiles weighted by household size. The outcome was consumption of fresh fruit and vegetables at least twice a day (58% among women and 33% among men). Beta-binomial regression analysis was used. Among women, higher income resulted in equally higher consumption of fruit and vegetables at all educational levels, that is, similar among those with low, intermediate and high education. Among men, the pattern was otherwise similar; however, men with intermediate education differed from those with low education. We conclude that the absolute cost of healthy food is likely to have a role across all income groups.
PubMed ID
20087380 View in PubMed
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Changes in the stability of dietary patterns in a study of middle-aged Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82196
Source
J Nutr. 2006 Jun;136(6):1582-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Weismayer Christoph
Anderson James G
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. weismayerc@gmail.com
Source
J Nutr. 2006 Jun;136(6):1582-7
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Cohort Studies
Diet
Diet Surveys
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Fruit
Humans
Meat
Middle Aged
Sweden
Time Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Dietary patterns reflecting food habits may be associated with chronic diseases, yet little is known about the stability of these patterns. The objective of this study was to observe over time the stability of dietary patterns measured with exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Four random subsamples of 1000 women between 49 and 70 y old were chosen from >60,000 women included in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Subjects in these subsamples were administered a FFQ 4, 5, 6, or 7 y after the baseline questionnaire; 3607 of the women responded (90% response rate). The stability of dietary patterns was evaluated with Spearman correlation coefficients between pattern scores at baseline and follow-ups and by a test of internal stability, which evaluated the significance of changes within patterns between baseline and follow-up. We found 3 major dietary patterns: a healthy pattern, a Western pattern, and an alcohol pattern. Correlations between explored dietary pattern scores at baseline and at follow-up decreased from 0.59 (P
PubMed ID
16702325 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of bladder cancer: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92177
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Sep;17(9):2519-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Larsson Susanna C
Andersson Swen-Olof
Johansson Jan-Erik
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Sep;17(9):2519-22
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Fruit and vegetable consumption has been inconsistently associated with risk of bladder cancer. We used data from a prospective population-based cohort study of 82,002 Swedish women and men to examine the association between fruit and vegetable consumption and bladder cancer incidence. Diet was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. During a mean follow-up of 9.4 years, 485 incident cases of bladder cancer were identified in the Swedish cancer registries. We found no statistically significant association between intakes of total fruits and vegetables, total fruits, or total vegetables and bladder cancer risk after adjustment for age, sex, education, and cigarette smoking. The multivariate rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) comparing the highest with the lowest quartile of intake were 0.80 (0.60-1.05) for total fruits and vegetables, 0.93 (0.69-1.25) for fruits, and 0.89 (0.67-1.19) for vegetables. Likewise, no associations were observed for citrus fruits, cruciferous vegetables, or green leafy vegetables. The associations did not differ by sex or smoking status. In conclusion, findings from this prospective study suggest that fruit and vegetable intakes are not likely to be appreciably associated with the risk of bladder cancer.
PubMed ID
18768526 View in PubMed
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Low intake of fruits, berries and vegetables is associated with excess mortality in men: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187153
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jan;133(1):199-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Tiina H Rissanen
Sari Voutilainen
Jyrki K Virtanen
Birgitta Venho
Meri Vanharanta
Jaakko Mursu
Jukka T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jan;133(1):199-204
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Diet
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Diets rich in fruits and vegetables have been of interest because of their potential health benefits against chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. The aim of this work was to assess the association of the dietary intake of a food group that includes fruits, berries and vegetables with all-cause, CVD-related and non-CVD-related mortality. The subjects were Finnish men aged 42-60 y examined in 1984-1989 in the prospective Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) Study. Dietary intakes were assessed by 4-d food intake record during the baseline phase of the KIHD Study. The risk of all-cause and non-CVD-related deaths was studied in 2641 men and the risk of CVD-related death in 1950 men who had no history of CVD at baseline. During a mean follow-up time of 12.8 y, cardiovascular as well as noncardiovascular and all-cause mortality were lower among men with the highest consumption of fruits, berries and vegetables. After adjustment for the major CVD risk factors, the relative risk for men in the highest fifth of fruit, berry and vegetable intake for all-cause death, CVD-related and non-CVD-related death was 0.66 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-0.88], 0.59 (0.33-1.06), and 0.68 (0.46-1.00), respectively, compared with men in the lowest fifth. These data show that a high fruit, berry and vegetable intake is associated with reduced risk of mortality in middle-aged Finnish men. Consequently, the findings of this work indicate that diets that are rich in plant-derived foods can promote longevity.
PubMed ID
12514290 View in PubMed
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Consumer acceptance of the New Nordic Diet. An exploratory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112840
Source
Appetite. 2013 Nov;70:14-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Arun Micheelsen
Lotte Holm
Katherine O'Doherty Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Food and Resource Economics, Section for Consumption, Bioethics and Governance, Copenhagen University, Rolighedsvej 25, 1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. armi@foi.ku.dk
Source
Appetite. 2013 Nov;70:14-21
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Choice Behavior
Denmark
Diet - standards
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Taste
Young Adult
Abstract
With direct reference to New Nordic Cuisine and Nordic dietary recommendations, the OPUS Research Centre in Denmark is developing and testing a healthy, regional New Nordic Diet (NND) that promises to have outstanding gastronomic properties. The NND is disseminated to Danish consumers with a view to improving public health. To explore the acceptability of the NND to consumers, a qualitative study comprising focus groups, home-testing of NND prototype meals and personal interviews was conducted in urban and rural areas (N=38). Most participants, particularly women and residents in urban areas, are positive towards the ideas underlying the development of this new diet and enjoy the taste and appearance of NND meals. Barriers to acceptance include the untraditional formats of NND meals, the time needed to prepare them, the unfamiliarity of ingredients, perceived problems regarding product availability, reservations about the elitist character of this project and unwillingness to exclude non-Nordic dishes on an everyday basis. The study concludes that several social and cultural barriers must be overcome if the NND shall constitute a source of improved public health. The pursuit of this objective could more fruitfully take its point of departure in in-depth consideration of existing food practices among Danish consumers.
PubMed ID
23792909 View in PubMed
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Socio-economic differences in the consumption of vegetables, fruit and berries in Russian and Finnish Karelia: 1992-2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145963
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2011 Feb;21(1):35-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Laura Paalanen
Ritva Prättälä
Hannele Palosuo
Tiina Laatikainen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. laura.paalanen@thl.fi
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2011 Feb;21(1):35-42
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Female
Finland
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Russia
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Food habits and their socio-economic differences in Russia have rarely been compared to those in western countries. Our aim was to determine socio-economic differences and their changes in the consumption of vegetables, fruit and berries in two neighbouring areas: the district of Pitkäranta in the Republic of Karelia, Russia, and North Karelia, Finland.
Cross-sectional risk factor surveys in Pitkäranta, in 1992, 1997, 2002 and 2007 (1144 men, 1528 women) and in North Karelia, in 1992, 1997 and 2002 (2049 men, 2316 women), were carried out. Data collected with a self-administered questionnaire were analysed with logistic regression.
The consumption of fruit and vegetables was more common in North Karelia than in Pitkäranta, but increased markedly in Pitkäranta from 1992 to 2007. In Pitkäranta, women, and in North Karelia both men and women with higher education ate fresh vegetables more often than those with a lower education. In both areas, daily consumption of fruit tended to be more common among subjects with a higher education. In Pitkäranta, there were virtually no differences by employment status. In North Karelia, vegetable consumption was less common among the unemployed than the employed subjects. Only minor socio-economic differences in berry consumption were observed. The educational differences in vegetable consumption seemed to widen in Pitkäranta and narrow in North Karelia.
A converging trend was observed, with the Russian consumption levels and socio-economic differences starting to approach those observed in Finland. This may be partly explained by the improvements in availability and affordability of fruit and vegetables in Pitkäranta.
PubMed ID
20089679 View in PubMed
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Cultural relevance of a fruit and vegetable food frequency questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171670
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2005;66(4):231-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Judy Paisley
Marlene Greenberg
Jess Haines
Author Affiliation
School of Nutrition, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2005;66(4):231-6
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cultural Diversity
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Fruit
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires - standards
Vegetables
Abstract
Canada's multicultural population poses challenges for culturally competent nutrition research and practice. In this qualitative study, the cultural relevance of a widely used semi-quantitative fruit and vegetable food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was examined among convenience samples of adults from Toronto's Cantonese-, Mandarin-, Portuguese-, and Vietnamese-speaking communities.
Eighty-nine participants were recruited through community-based organizations, programs, and advertisements to participate in semi-structured interviews moderated in their native language. Data from the interviews were translated into English and transcribed for analysis using the constant comparative approach.
Four main themes emerged from the analysis: the cultural relevance of the foods listed on the FFQ, words with multiple meanings, the need for culturally appropriate portion-size prompts, and the telephone survey as a Western concept.
This research highlights the importance of investing resources to develop culturally relevant dietary assessment tools that ensure dietary assessment accuracy and, more important, reduce ethnocentric biases in food and nutrition research and practice. The transferability of findings must be established through further research.
PubMed ID
16332297 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of acute coronary syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99436
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul;104(2):248-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Louise Hansen
Lars O Dragsted
Anja Olsen
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Erik B Schmidt
Kim Overvad
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. louhan@cancer.dk
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul;104(2):248-55
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Prospective epidemiological studies have reported that a higher fruit and vegetable intake is associated with a lower risk of CHD. The aim of the present study was to examine associations between fruit and vegetable consumption, in particular the subgroupings citrus fruits, apples and cruciferous vegetables, and the risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). During a median follow-up of 7.7 years, 1075 incident ACS cases were identified among 53 383 men and women, aged 50-64 years at recruitment into the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study in 1993-7. Fruit and vegetable intake was estimated from a validated FFQ, and ACS incidence rate ratios (IRR) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Overall, a tendency towards a lower risk of ACS was observed for both men and women with higher fruit and vegetable consumption. For men, we found an inverse association for apple intake (IRR per 25 g/d: 0.97; 95 % CI 0.94, 0.99). This association was also seen among women, albeit borderline significant. However, a higher risk was seen among women with higher fruit juice intake (IRR per 25 g/d: 1.04; 95 % CI 1.00, 1.08). The present results provide some support for previously observed inverse associations between fresh fruit intake, particularly apples, and ACS risk.
PubMed ID
20178672 View in PubMed
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218 records – page 1 of 22.