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Dietary changes in Finland--success stories and future challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182675
Source
Appetite. 2003 Dec;41(3):245-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Ritva Prättälä
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute (KTL), Mannerheimintie 166, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland. ritva.prattala@ktl.fi
Source
Appetite. 2003 Dec;41(3):245-9
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Finland
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Nutrition Policy
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
The paper describes dietary changes and related nutrition policies and interventions in Finland since the 1960s. Dietary changes are interpreted from the lifestyle perspective, in which food consumption patterns are assumed to be formed by the interplay of individual choices and structural chances, such as socioeconomic and cultural conditions. Finland can demonstrate a success story when it comes to decreased use of dairy fats and increased use of vegetables and fruit. However, the prevalence of overweight has increased. Nutrition policies and interventions together with sociocultural factors have supported the shift towards healthy nutrition. The same factors have promoted overweight, as well.
PubMed ID
14637322 View in PubMed
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Increased consumption of fruit and vegetables and future cancer incidence in selected European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100404
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Sep;46(14):2563-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Isabelle Soerjomataram
Dian Oomen
Valery Lemmens
Anke Oenema
Vassiliki Benetou
Antonia Trichopoulou
Jan Willem Coebergh
Jan Barendregt
Esther de Vries
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. i.soerjomataram@erasmusmc.nl
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Sep;46(14):2563-80
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Forecasting
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Cancer is one of the major causes of death in western countries. Fruit and vegetable consumption may reduce the risk of cancers of the oropharynx, oesophagus, lung, stomach and colorectum. We investigated the potential effect of interventions aimed at increasing the intake of fruits and vegetables to the recommended level (500 g/d) on future cancer incidence in Europe. Data on cancer incidence and daily intake of fruit and vegetables were compiled for France, Germany, The Netherlands, Spain and Sweden. We also performed a meta-analysis of European observational studies to arrive at a quantitative estimate on the association between fruit and vegetable intake and cancer risk. Predictions on the future cancer incidence were modelled using PREVENT 3.01. Our study predicted 212,000 fruit- and vegetable-related cancer cases in these countries in 2050, out of which 398 (0.19%) might be prevented if the 500 g/d fruit and vegetable intake were achieved in the aforementioned countries. The largest absolute impact was observed for lung cancer with 257 (out of 136,517) preventable cases if the intervention was successfully implemented. Sweden would benefit the most from intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption with a 2% reduction in expected cases. Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption has a small impact on reducing the burden of cancer in Europe. Health impact assessment tools such as PREVENT can provide the basis for decision making in chronic disease prevention.
PubMed ID
20843486 View in PubMed
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[Consumption of fruit and vegetables in a teenage cohort--observed changes]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52569
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Jun 20;119(16):2327-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1999
Author
N. Lien
K I Klepp
Author Affiliation
Johan Throne Holst institutt for ernaeringsforskning Universitetet i Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Jun 20;119(16):2327-30
Date
Jun-20-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Norway
Vegetables
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to investigate the consumption of fruit and vegetables among boys and girls in a teenage cohort with respect to changes, gender differences and stability of consumption over time. In 1990, a representative sample of 13-year-olds from Hordaland county was recruited (n = 924) and surveyed regularly until the age of 19. The frequency of consumption decreased dramatically from the age of 13 to the age of 19. At the age of 13, 57% reported eating fruit daily, whereas only 21% of the boys and 37% of the girls reported eating fruit daily at the age of 19. Corresponding results for the consumption of vegetables showed that 42% reported eating vegetables daily at the age of 13, compared to 29% at the age of 19. No clear gender differences were found. The consumption frequency at group level at the age of 13 was a good indicator of the consumption frequency at a later age during adolescence. While younger adolescents until now have been at the focus of campaigns aimed at increasing fruit and vegetable consumption, our results point to the importance of focusing also on the older adolescents.
PubMed ID
10414196 View in PubMed
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Correlates of soft drink and fruit juice consumption among Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91759
Source
Br J Nutr. 2009 May;101(10):1541-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Vågstrand Karin
Linné Yvonne
Karlsson Jan
Elfhag Kristina
Karin Lindroos Anna
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. karin.vagstrand@ki.se
Source
Br J Nutr. 2009 May;101(10):1541-8
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Beverages
Carbonated Beverages
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Female
Fruit
Humans
Life Style
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate how soft drink and fruit juice consumption in teenagers is associated with life-style, other food choices, eating behaviour and maternal characteristics. A cross-sectional study of 16-year-old girls (n 275) and boys (n 199) and their mothers was undertaken. Questionnaires were used to assess habitual dietary intake, eating behaviour, physical activity, smoking and educational level. Weight and height were measured. It was found that eating breakfast less than five times per week was independently associated with a high soft drink consumption in both girls and boys. A low intake of cooked meals and milk and a high intake of salty snacks were associated with soft drinks in boys only, and a low intake of fruits in girls only. A high maternal juice intake, low milk and high fruit consumption were independent correlates of fruit juice intake in both girls and boys. In girls, being a smoker, having a smoking mother, a high soft drink intake, scoring low on emotional eating and high on cognitive restraint were also associated with fruit juice intake. A low intake of soft drinks and cooked meals was associated with fruit juice intake in boys only. Neither soft drinks nor fruit juice was associated with BMI. In conclusion, a high intake of both fruit juice and soft drinks were associated with a lower intake of foods such as milk and cooked meals. It might be possible to influence fruit juice intake among teenagers by aiming at their mothers, whereas the adolescents themselves should be targeted when the aim is to reduce soft drink consumption.
PubMed ID
18838019 View in PubMed
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Socioeconomic status and lifestyle choices: evidence from latent class analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140308
Source
Health Econ. 2011 Aug;20(8):971-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Arnstein Ovrum
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Agricultural Economics Research Institute, Oslo, Norway. arnstein.ovrum@nilf.no
Source
Health Econ. 2011 Aug;20(8):971-84
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Exercise
Fruit - supply & distribution
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Models, Econometric
Norway
Risk-Taking
Social Class
Vegetables - supply & distribution
Abstract
This paper uses repeated cross-section data from Norway to estimate the demand for fruits and vegetables (FV) and physical activity (PA) with a particular focus on the role of socioeconomic status. Conventional econometric count data models produce results that are commonly found in empirical work; the effect of higher socioeconomic status on healthy behavior is positive and generally statistically significant, but the average partial effects are in some cases small and imprecisely estimated. For both behaviors, subsequent latent class models identify two subpopulations - or groups of people - with different sets of preferences; one group has low latent demands, but for these individuals, average partial effects of socioeconomic status are generally stronger than those predicted by the conventional models. The other smaller group consists of individuals who have high latent demands, but whose variability in behavior is poorly explained by socioeconomic status. Posterior analysis shows that individuals with higher socioeconomic status are more likely to belong to the healthier of these two groups. Proxies for time preferences, risk, self-control, and time constraints are also found to be important in characterizing high latent demand groups for PA and FV.
PubMed ID
20891025 View in PubMed
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Who eats 5 a day?: intake of fruits and vegetables among Norwegians in relation to gender and lifestyle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52647
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1998 Jun;98(6):689-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
L. Johansson
L F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Institute for Nutrition Research in Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 1998 Jun;98(6):689-91
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Educational Status
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
PubMed ID
9627628 View in PubMed
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Dietary non enzymatic antioxidant capacity and the risk of myocardial infarction in the Swedish women's lifestyle and health cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297934
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 02; 33(2):213-221
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
Essi Hantikainen
Marie Löf
Alessandra Grotta
Ylva Trolle Lagerros
Mauro Serafini
Rino Bellocco
Elisabete Weiderpass
Author Affiliation
Department of Statistics and Quantitative Methods, University of Milano-Bicocca, Edificio U7, Via Bicocca degli Arcimboldi 8, 20126, Milan, Italy.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 02; 33(2):213-221
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Foods rich in antioxidants have been associated with a reduced risk of myocardial infarction. However, findings from randomized clinical trials on the role of antioxidant supplementation remain controversial. It has been suggested that antioxidants interact with each other to promote cardiovascular health. We therefore investigated the association between dietary Non Enzymatic Antioxidant Capacity (NEAC), measuring the total antioxidant potential of the whole diet, and the risk of myocardial infarction. We followed 45,882 women aged 30-49 years and free from cardiovascular diseases through record linkages from 1991 until 2012. Dietary NEAC was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire collected at baseline. Total dietary NEAC was categorized into quintiles and multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression models were fitted to estimate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). During a mean follow-up time of 20.3 years we detected 657 incident cases of myocardial infarction. After adjusting for potential confounders, we found a significant 28% lower risk of myocardial infarction among women in the fourth (HR: 0.72; 95% CI 0.55-0.95) and a 40% lower risk among women in the fifth quintile (HR: 0.60, 95% CI 0.45-0.81) of dietary NEAC compared to women in the first quintile, with a significant trend (p-value 
PubMed ID
29372463 View in PubMed
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Disparities in the frequency of fruit and vegetable consumption by socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130175
Source
Nutr J. 2011;10:118
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Sunday Azagba
Mesbah F Sharaf
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd, West, Montréal, Quebec, H3G 1M8, Canada.
Source
Nutr J. 2011;10:118
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Educational Status
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
The health benefits of adequate fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption are significant and widely documented. However, many individuals self-report low F&V consumption frequency per day. This paper examines the disparities in the frequency of F&V consumption by socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics.
This study uses a representative sample of 93,719 individuals from the Canadian Community Health Survey (2007). A quantile regression model is estimated in order to capture the differential effects of F&V determinants across the conditional distribution of F&V consumption.
The conditional and unconditional analyses reveal the existence of a socioeconomic gradient in F&V consumption frequency, in which the low income-education groups consume F&V less frequently than the high income-education groups. We also find significant disparities in F&V consumption frequency by demographic and lifestyle characteristics. The frequency of F&V consumption is relatively lower among: males, those in middle age, singles, smokers, individuals with weak social interaction and households with no children. The quantile regression results show that the association between F&V consumption frequency, and socio-demographic and lifestyle factors varies significantly along the conditional F&V consumption distribution. In particular, individual educational attainment is positively and significantly associated with F&V consumption frequency across different parts of the F&V distribution, while the income level matters only over the lower half of the distribution. F&V consumption follows a U-shaped pattern across the age categories. Those aged 30-39, 40-49 and 50-59 years consume F&V less frequently than those aged 18-29 years. The smallest F&V consumption is among the middle aged adults (40-49).
Understanding the socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics of individuals with low F&V consumption frequency could increase the effectiveness of policies aimed at promoting F&V consumption. The differential effects of individual characteristics along the F&V consumption distribution suggest the need for a multifaceted approach to address the variation in F&V consumption frequency.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22027238 View in PubMed
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Diet and lifestyle factors associated with fish consumption in men and women: a study of whether gender differences can result in gender-specific confounding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118430
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:101
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Maria Wennberg
Andreas Tornevi
Ingegerd Johansson
Agneta Hörnell
Margareta Norberg
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå 901 87, Sweden. maria.wennberg@envmed.umu.se
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:101
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Animals
Chickens
Diet
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Vegetables
Abstract
Fish consumption and intake of omega-3 fatty acids from fish are associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, a prospective study from northern Sweden showed that high consumption of fish is associated with an increased risk of stroke in men, but not in women. The current study aimed to determine if fish consumption is differently related to lifestyle in men compared with women in northern Sweden.
Lifestyle information on 32,782 men and 34,866 women (aged 30-60 years) was collected between 1992 and 2006 within the Västerbotten Intervention Programme (a health intervention in northern Sweden). Spearman correlations coefficients (Rs) were calculated between self-reported consumption of fish and other food items. Lifestyle variables were compared between fish consumption categories.
Fish consumption was positively associated with other foods considered healthy (e.g., root vegetables, lettuce/cabbage/spinach/broccoli, chicken, and berries; Rs = 0.21-0.30), as well as with other healthy lifestyle factors (e.g., exercise and not smoking) and a higher educational level, in both men and women. The only gender difference found, concerned the association between fish consumption and alcohol consumption. Men who were high consumers of fish had a higher intake of all types of alcohol compared with low to moderate fish consumers. For women, this was true only for wine.
Except for alcohol, the association between fish consumption and healthy lifestyle did not differ between men and women in northern Sweden. It is important to adjust for other lifestyle variables and socioeconomic variables in studies concerning the effect of fish consumption on disease outcome.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23210480 View in PubMed
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Mediterranean dietary pattern and risk of breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116509
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(2):e55374
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Elisabeth Couto
Sven Sandin
Marie Löf
Giske Ursin
Hans-Olov Adami
Elisabete Weiderpass
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(2):e55374
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cereals
Cohort Studies
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Fruit
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Premenopause
Questionnaires
Risk
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
A Mediterranean diet has a recognized beneficial effect on health and longevity, with a protective influence on several cancers. However, its association with breast cancer risk remains unclear.
We aimed to investigate whether adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern influences breast cancer risk.
The Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort study includes 49,258 women aged 30 to 49 years at recruitment in 1991-1992. Consumption of foods and beverages was measured at enrollment using a food frequency questionnaire. A Mediterranean diet score was constructed based on the consumption of alcohol, vegetables, fruits, legumes, cereals, fish, the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fat, and dairy and meat products. Relative risks (RR) for breast cancer and specific tumor characteristics (invasiveness, histological type, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, malignancy grade and stage) associated with this score were estimated using Cox regression controlling for potential confounders.
1,278 incident breast cancers were diagnosed. Adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern was not statistically significantly associated with reduced risk of breast cancer overall, or with specific breast tumor characteristics. A RR (95% confidence interval) for breast cancer associated with a two-point increment in the Mediterranean diet score was 1.08 (1.00-1.15) in all women, and 1.10 (1.01-1.21) and 1.02 (0.91-1.15) in premenopausal and postmenopausal women, respectively. When alcohol was excluded from the Mediterranean diet score, results became not statistically significant.
Adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern did not decrease breast cancer risk in this cohort of relatively young women.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23390532 View in PubMed
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46 records – page 1 of 5.