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30 records – page 1 of 3.

Role of various carotenoids in lung cancer prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203297
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1999 Jan 20;91(2):182-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1999
Author
P. Knekt
R. Järvinen
L. Teppo
A. Aromaa
R. Seppänen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. paul.knekt@ktl.fi
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1999 Jan 20;91(2):182-4
Date
Jan-20-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticarcinogenic Agents - therapeutic use
Carotenoids - therapeutic use
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk
Vegetables
PubMed ID
9923861 View in PubMed
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Low intake of fruits, berries and vegetables is associated with excess mortality in men: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187153
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jan;133(1):199-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Tiina H Rissanen
Sari Voutilainen
Jyrki K Virtanen
Birgitta Venho
Meri Vanharanta
Jaakko Mursu
Jukka T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jan;133(1):199-204
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Diet
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Diets rich in fruits and vegetables have been of interest because of their potential health benefits against chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. The aim of this work was to assess the association of the dietary intake of a food group that includes fruits, berries and vegetables with all-cause, CVD-related and non-CVD-related mortality. The subjects were Finnish men aged 42-60 y examined in 1984-1989 in the prospective Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) Study. Dietary intakes were assessed by 4-d food intake record during the baseline phase of the KIHD Study. The risk of all-cause and non-CVD-related deaths was studied in 2641 men and the risk of CVD-related death in 1950 men who had no history of CVD at baseline. During a mean follow-up time of 12.8 y, cardiovascular as well as noncardiovascular and all-cause mortality were lower among men with the highest consumption of fruits, berries and vegetables. After adjustment for the major CVD risk factors, the relative risk for men in the highest fifth of fruit, berry and vegetable intake for all-cause death, CVD-related and non-CVD-related death was 0.66 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-0.88], 0.59 (0.33-1.06), and 0.68 (0.46-1.00), respectively, compared with men in the lowest fifth. These data show that a high fruit, berry and vegetable intake is associated with reduced risk of mortality in middle-aged Finnish men. Consequently, the findings of this work indicate that diets that are rich in plant-derived foods can promote longevity.
PubMed ID
12514290 View in PubMed
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Flavonoid intake and coronary mortality in Finland: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212623
Source
BMJ. 1996 Feb 24;312(7029):478-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-1996
Author
P. Knekt
R. Jarvinen
A. Reunanen
J. Maatela
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 1996 Feb 24;312(7029):478-81
Date
Feb-24-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Allium
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - mortality
Diet
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quercetin - administration & dosage
Risk factors
Abstract
To study the association between dietary intake of flavonoids and subsequent coronary mortality.
A cohort study based on data collected at the Finnish mobile clinic health examination survey from 1967-72 and followed up until 1992.
30 communities from different parts of Finland.
5133 Finnish men and women aged 30-69 years and free from heart disease at baseline.
Dietary intake of flavonoids, total mortality, and coronary mortality.
In women a significant inverse gradient was observed between dietary intake of flavonoids and total and coronary mortality. The relative risks between highest and lowest quarters of flavonoid intake adjusted for age, smoking, serum cholesterol concentration, blood pressure, and body mass index were 0.69 (95% confidence interval 0.53 to 0.90) and 0.54 (0.33 to 0.87) for total and coronary mortality, respectively. The corresponding values for men were 0.76 (0.63 to 0.93) and 0.78 (0.56 to 1.08), respectively. Adjustment for intake of antioxidant vitamins and fatty acids weakened the associations for women; the relative risks for coronary heart disease were 0.73 (0.41 to 1.32) and 0.67 (0.44 to 1.00) in women and men, respectively. Intakes of onions and apples, the main dietary sources of flavonoids, presented similar associations. The relative risks for coronary mortality between highest and lowest quarters of apple intake were 0.57 (0.36 to 0.91) and 0.81 (0.61 to 1.09) for women and men, respectively. The corresponding values for onions were 0.50 (0.30 to 0.82) and 0.74 (0.53 to 1.02), respectively.
The results suggest that people with very low intakes of flavonoids have higher risks of coronary disease.
Notes
Cites: Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1976;161(2):131-5973454
Cites: Acta Med Scand Suppl. 1983;673:1-1206578675
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1995 Feb 27;155(4):381-67848021
Cites: Lancet. 1993 Oct 23;342(8878):1007-118105262
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Cites: Biochem Pharmacol. 1987 Feb 1;36(3):317-223101704
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1987 Apr;84(8):2489-933470807
Cites: Biochem Pharmacol. 1990 Jun 1;39(11):1743-502344371
Cites: Free Radic Biol Med. 1990;9(1):19-212170243
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1990 Nov;52(5):903-82239766
Cites: Biochem Pharmacol. 1993 Jan 7;45(1):67-758424824
Comment In: BMJ. 1996 Jun 8;312(7044):1479-808664652
Comment In: ACP J Club. 1996 Jul-Aug;125(1):22-3
Comment In: BMJ. 1996 Feb 24;312(7029):458-98597666
Comment In: BMJ. 1996 Jun 8;312(7044):1479; author reply 14808664651
PubMed ID
8597679 View in PubMed
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Dietary patterns and their associations with home food availability among Finnish pre-school children: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299379
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1232-1242
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018
Author
Henna Vepsäläinen
Liisa Korkalo
Vera Mikkilä
Reetta Lehto
Carola Ray
Kaija Nissinen
Essi Skaffari
Mikael Fogelholm
Leena Koivusilta
Eva Roos
Maijaliisa Erkkola
Author Affiliation
1Department of Food and Environmental Sciences,University of Helsinki, PO Box 66,FI-00014 University of Helsinki,Helsinki,Finland.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1232-1242
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Fruit
Humans
Vegetables
Abstract
To study the associations between home food availability and dietary patterns among pre-school children.
Cross-sectional study in which parents of the participating children filled in an FFQ and reported how often they had certain foods in their homes. We derived dietary pattern scores using principal component analysis, and composite scores describing the availability of fruits and vegetables as well as sugar-enriched foods in the home were created for each participant. We used multilevel models to investigate the associations between availability and dietary pattern scores.
The DAGIS study, Finland.
The participants were 864 Finnish 3-6-year-old children recruited from sixty-six pre-schools. The analyses included 711 children with sufficient data.
We identified three dietary patterns explaining 16·7 % of the variance. The patterns were named 'sweets-and-treats' (high loadings of e.g. sweet biscuits, chocolate, ice cream), 'health-conscious' (high loadings of e.g. nuts, natural yoghurt, berries) and 'vegetables-and-processed meats' (high loadings of e.g. vegetables, cold cuts, fruit). In multivariate models, the availability of fruits and vegetables was inversely associated with the sweets-and-treats pattern (ß=-0·05, P
PubMed ID
29331168 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of calicivirus associated with consumption of frozen raspberries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199353
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1999 Dec;123(3):469-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
A. Pönkä
L. Maunula
C H von Bonsdorff
O. Lyytikäinen
Author Affiliation
Helsinki City Center of the Environment, Finland.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1999 Dec;123(3):469-74
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caliciviridae - pathogenicity
Caliciviridae Infections - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Contamination
Frozen Foods - virology
Fruit - virology
Gastroenteritis - etiology - virology
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In April 1988, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred among employees in a large company in Helsinki, Finland. A retrospective cohort study, using a self-administered questionnaire, was carried out to ascertain the cause and extent of the outbreak. To meet the case definition, employees had to have had diarrhoea and/or vomiting since 2 April, 1998. A subanalysis was made in the biggest office, consisting of 360 employees, of whom 204 (57%) completed the questionnaire. Of these 108 (53%) met the case definition. Employees who had eaten raspberry dressing were more likely to meet the case definition than those who had not (Attack Rate (AR) 65% versus AR 18% Relative Risk, (RR) 3.7, 95%, Confidence Intervals (CI) 2.0-6.7). Four stool specimens obtained from affected kitchen staff who had all eaten the raspberry dressing and who had all become ill simultaneously with the employees were positive by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for calicivirus. The data suggest that the primary source of the outbreak was imported frozen raspberries contaminated by calicivirus.
PubMed ID
10694159 View in PubMed
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Dietary flavonoids and the risk of lung cancer and other malignant neoplasms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207880
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Aug 1;146(3):223-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-1997
Author
P. Knekt
R. Järvinen
R. Seppänen
M. Hellövaara
L. Teppo
E. Pukkala
A. Aromaa
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Aug 1;146(3):223-30
Date
Aug-1-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Diet Surveys
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Fruit
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Flavonoids are effective antioxidants and, in theory, may provide protection against cancer, although direct human evidence of this is scarce. The relation between the intake of antioxidant flavonoids and subsequent risk of cancer was studied among 9,959 Finnish men and women aged 15-99 years and initially cancer free. Food consumption was estimated by the dietary history method, covering the total habitual diet during the previous year. During a follow-up in 1967-1991, 997 cancer cases and 151 lung cancer cases were diagnosed. An inverse association was observed between the intake of flavonoids and incidence of all sites of cancer combined. The sex- and age-adjusted relative risk of all sites of cancer combined between the highest and lowest quartiles of flavonoid intake was 0.80 (95% confidence interval 0.67-0.96). This association was mainly a result of lung cancer, which presented a corresponding relative risk of 0.54 (95% confidence interval 0.34-0.87). The association between flavonoid intake and lung cancer incidence was not due to the intake of antioxidant vitamins or other potential confounding factors, as adjustment for factors such as smoking and intakes of energy, vitamin E, vitamin C, and beta-carotene did not materially alter the results. The association was strongest in persons under 50 years of age and in nonsmokers with relative risks of 0.33 (95% confidence interval 0.15-0.77) and 0.13 (95% confidence interval 0.03-0.58), respectively. Of the major dietary flavonoid sources, the consumption of apples showed an inverse association with lung cancer incidence, with a relative risk of 0.42 (95% confidence interval 0.23-0.76) after adjustment for the intake of other fruits and vegetables. The results are in line with the hypothesis that flavonoid intake in some circumstances may be involved in the cancer process, resulting in lowered risks.
PubMed ID
9247006 View in PubMed
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Plant foods and the risk of cerebrovascular diseases: a potential protection of fruit consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149373
Source
Br J Nutr. 2009 Oct;102(7):1075-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Anna Mizrahi
Paul Knekt
Jukka Montonen
Maarit A Laaksonen
Markku Heliövaara
Ritva Järvinen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2009 Oct;102(7):1075-83
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cereals
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Stroke - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vegetables
Abstract
Studies on the association between plant foods and cerebrovascular diseases have given contradictory results suggesting the existence of some effect-modifying factors. The present study determines whether the consumption of plant foods (i.e. fruits and berries, vegetables, and cereals) predicts a decreased cerebrovascular disease incidence in a population with low fruit and vegetable and high wholegrain intake. This cohort study on 3932 men and women was based on data from the Finnish Mobile Clinic Health Examination Survey, conducted in 1968-72. The participants were 40-74 years of age and free of cardiovascular diseases at baseline. Data on the plant food consumption were derived from a 1-year dietary history interview. During a 24-year follow-up 625 cases of cerebrovascular diseases occurred, leading to either hospitalisation or death. An inverse association was found between fruit consumption and the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases, ischaemic stroke and intracerebral haemorrhage. The adjusted relative risks (RR) between the highest and lowest quartiles of intake of any cerebrovascular disease, ischaemic stroke and intracerebral haemorrhage were 0.75 (95 % CI 0.59, 0.94), 0.73 (95 % CI 0.54, 1.00) and 0.47 (95 % CI 0.24, 0.92), respectively. These associations were primarily due to the consumption of citrus fruits and occurred only in men. Total consumption of vegetables or cereals was not associated with the cerebrovascular disease incidence. The consumption of cruciferous vegetables, however, predicted a reduced risk of cerebrovascular diseases (RR 0.79; 95 % CI 0.63, 0.99), ischaemic stroke (RR 0.67; 95 % CI 0.49, 0.92) and intracerebral haemorrhage (RR 0.49; 95 % CI 0.25, 0.98). In conclusion, the consumption of fruits, especially citrus, and cruciferous vegetables may protect against cerebrovascular diseases.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Nutr. 2009 Oct;102(7):947-819671202
PubMed ID
19646291 View in PubMed
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Layperson-oriented vs. clinical-based models for prediction of incidence of ischemic stroke: National FINRISK Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129523
Source
Int J Stroke. 2012 Dec;7(8):662-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Qing Qiao
Weiguo Gao
Tiina Laatikainen
Erkki Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. qing.qiao@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Stroke. 2012 Dec;7(8):662-8
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Diet
Epidemiologic Methods
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Stroke - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Vegetables
Abstract
A simplified model not requiring a clinic visit is important for cardiovascular prevention. We compared such a model, with one requiring clinical measurements for prediction of ischemic stroke.
Five population-based Finnish cohorts comprising 14?296 men and 16?065 women aged 25-64 years were randomly recruited from 1982, and followed up using the national registers until the end of the 2007. The final Cox model included age, prior history of diabetes and hypertension, happy marriage, capability to walk 500 m (self-estimate), regular exercise, vegetable/fruit intake, smoking, body mass index, and systolic blood pressure; the layperson-oriented model was developed by taking blood pressure away from the final model.
Four hundred sixty-nine men and 371 women developed ischemic stroke events. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (95% confidence interval) for 10 years incidence of ischemic stroke was 0·817 (0·791-0·843) and 0·813 (0·787-0·839) for the model with and without systolic blood pressure in men and 0·815 (0·782-0·848) and 0·812 (0·779-0·844), respectively, in women (P?>?0·10). The predicted 10-year events rate matched well with the observed one across deciles of the predicted risk in men (?(2) ?=?11·57, 9df, P?=?0·239) and in women (?(2) ?=?11·18, P?=?0·263). The overall net reclassification improvement after adding blood pressure was 8·8% (P?=?0·016) in men and 3·2% (P?=?0·234) in women. The predicted 10-year risk of the ischemic stroke based on global vascular event models that includes coronary heart diseases did not match well with the observed stroke risk.
The layperson model performed as well as the clinical-based one.
PubMed ID
22098944 View in PubMed
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Food consumption and the incidence of type II diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176440
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;59(3):441-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
J. Montonen
R. Järvinen
M. Heliövaara
A. Reunanen
A. Aromaa
P. Knekt
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. jukka.montonen@ktl.fi
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;59(3):441-8
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet Surveys
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Risk
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
The consumption of different foods was studied for their ability to predict type II diabetes mellitus.
The study design was a cohort study, based on the Finnish Mobile Clinic Health Examination Survey.
A total of 30 communities from different parts of Finland.
A total of 4304 men and women, 40-69 y of age and free of diabetes at baseline in 1967-1972 and followed up for incidence of diabetes medication during 23 y (383 incident cases).
Higher intakes of green vegetables, fruit and berries, oil and margarine, and poultry were found to predict a reduced risk of type II diabetes. The relative risks of developing type II diabetes between the extreme quartiles of the intakes were 0.69 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.50-0.93; P for trend (P) = 0.02) for green vegetables, 0.69 (CI = 0.51-0.92; P = 0.03) for fruit and berries, 0.71 (CI = 0.52-0.98; P = 0.01) for margarine and oil, and 0.71 (CI = 0.54-0.94; P = 0.01) for poultry.
The results suggest that prevention of type II diabetes might be aided by consumption of certain foods that are rich in nutrients with hypothesized health benefits.
PubMed ID
15674312 View in PubMed
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Low ß-carotene concentrations increase the risk of cardiovascular disease mortality among Finnish men with risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125301
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2012 Oct;22(10):921-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
J. Karppi
J A Laukkanen
T H Mäkikallio
K. Ronkainen
S. Kurl
Author Affiliation
University of Eastern Finland, Department of Medicine, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, FI-70211 Kuopio, Finland. jouni.karppi@uef.fi
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2012 Oct;22(10):921-8
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Carotenoids - blood
Diet
European Continental Ancestry Group
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - mortality - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Vegetables
beta Carotene - blood
Abstract
Healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables is an important factor in prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Some previous epidemiological studies have suggested that dietary and serum carotenoids are associated with decreased CVD mortality, but the results have been inconsistent. We assessed relations between the concentrations of serum carotenoids and CVD mortality among Eastern Finnish men.
The study population consisted of 1031 Eastern Finnish men aged 46-65 years in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) cohort. Subjects were classified quartiles according to concentrations of carotenoids and subgroups according to risk factors. Hazard ratios of serum lycopene, a-carotene and ß-carotene were estimated by the Cox proportional hazard model after adjusting for potential confounding factors. During the median 15.9-year follow-up, 122 deaths from CVDs, were identified among the cohort subjects. Low serum concentrations of ß-carotene were strongly related to an increased CVD mortality risk after adjustment for confounders. For ß-carotene, the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for the lowest versus highest quartile was 2.23 (1.26-3.93; P=0.006). However, the strongest risk of CVD mortality was observed among smokers with lowest levels of ß-carotene (HR=3.15, 95%, CI: 1.19-8.33; P=0.020). Other carotenoids and the sum of carotenoids were not significantly related to increased risk of CVD mortality.
Low concentrations of serum ß-carotene concentrations may increase the risk for CVD mortality among Eastern Finnish men; thus elevated serum concentrations of ß-carotene may have clinical and public health relevance.
PubMed ID
22494809 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.