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Effect of a nutrition intervention on intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread among low and high consumers in the Norwegian National Guard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275465
Source
Mil Med. 2014 Sep;179(9):1013-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Solveig Uglem
Marte K Råberg Kjøllesdal
Wenche Frølich
Margareta Wandel
Source
Mil Med. 2014 Sep;179(9):1013-20
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread
Energy intake
Fruit
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Norway
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Young Adult
Abstract
Nutritional information seldom reaches individuals with the most unhealthful dietary habits.
To explore whether an intervention focusing on a combination of nutritional information and increased availability of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread was effective to raise the intake, and knowledge, of these foods among recruits in the military with low as well as high baseline intake.
Intervention study, including 479 recruits, in intervention and control military camps. The participants were divided into three groups (low, medium, and high) according to their baseline intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread.
Those with low/medium baseline intake in the intervention camp had a significant increase in the intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread at follow-up. All three intake groups in the intervention camp also had significantly higher intake of these foods compared to those in the control camp at follow-up. The knowledge scores increased significantly among both high and low consumers in the intervention camp, but not in the control camp.
The intervention led to increased intake of vegetables, fruits, and semi whole grain bread among those recruits in the intervention camp, who were most in need to change their diet.
PubMed ID
25181720 View in PubMed
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Do we know how much we put on the plate? Assessment of the accuracy of self-estimated versus weighed vegetables and whole grain portions using an Intelligent Buffet at the FoodScape Lab.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261861
Source
Appetite. 2014 Oct;81:162-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
T R Nørnberg
L. Houlby
L N Jørgensen
C. He
F J A Pérez-Cueto
Source
Appetite. 2014 Oct;81:162-7
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cereals
Denmark
Diet
Energy intake
Feeding Behavior
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Meals
Portion Size
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of self-estimated vegetable and whole grain serving sizes in a self-served buffet meal. The study took place in a laboratory setting where an Intelligent Buffet was used to register the exact weight of each food type that was self-served by each participant. The initial sample consisted of 58 participants recruited from Aalborg University in Copenhagen, of which 52 participants (59% male) provided complete estimates on the weight of whole grains and 49 participants (63% male) provided complete estimates on the weight of vegetable servings in their meal. The majority of the participants were students aged 20-29?years (85% for whole grain responses and 82% for vegetable responses). Significant differences between self-estimated and actual portion size estimates were observed for both vegetables and whole grains (P??0.05). In conclusion, the participants' ability to accurately assess the serving size of vegetables and whole grains in a self-served meal did not correspond with the actual amount served. This may have implications for consumer interpretation of dietary recommendations used in nutrition interventions in Denmark.
PubMed ID
24928435 View in PubMed
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The intake of fruit and sweets in rural and urban Greenland--development from 1994 to 2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134926
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Apr;70(2):186-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Birgit Niclasen
Mette Rasmussen
Ina Borup
Christina Schnohr
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden. niclasen@greennet.gl
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Apr;70(2):186-94
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Candy
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Greenland
Humans
Male
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
The aim of this study is to explore the intake of fruit and sweets in Greenlandic schoolchildren aged 11, 13 and 15 years in villages, towns and the capital by cross-sectional data collected in 4 comparative surveys from 1994 to 2006. Study design. Repeated cross-sectional study.
Data from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey, with responses from 1,302 students in 1994, 1,648 in 1998, 891 in 2002 and 1,366 in 2006, each in the age groups of 11, 13 and 15 years.
From 1994 to 2006, the odds ratio for eating fruit daily showed a decline while odds for never eating fruit increased in children living in all types of habitations. For all survey years the intake of fruit was lowest in villages and in 2006 only about 15-20% of village children consumed fruit every day. No general trends were found in the daily intake of sweets or for never eating sweets. Only 6% or less of the respondents never ate sweets. Minor age group and gender differences were seen. For sweets, children in the capital in 2006 had a lower daily use than village children.
Greenland is in the process of nutritional transition. The increase in the proportion of schoolchildren that do not meet the national recommendations for daily fruit consumption and the failure to reduce children's intake of sweets is worrying. The intake of fruit was, for all years, lowest in the villages and was probably related (among other things) to cost and access. The implications of the findings are discussed.
Notes
Erratum In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Jun;70(3):231
PubMed ID
21527069 View in PubMed
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Usefulness of a short food frequency questionnaire for screening of low intake of fruit and vegetable and for intake of fat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61659
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2002 Sep;12(3):208-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Lene F Andersen
Lars Johansson
Kari Solvoll
Author Affiliation
Institute for Nutrition Research, University of Oslo, Norway. l.f.andersen@basalmed.uio.no
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2002 Sep;12(3):208-13
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Basal Metabolism
Diet Records
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Norway
Public Health Practice
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Simple screening tools to identify intake of fruit, vegetables and fat are necessary to design effective public health intervention strategies in order to increase intake of fruit and vegetable and to reduce fat intake. METHODS: 108 men recorded their food intake for 14 days and filled in a 27-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) 1.5-2 months later. Estimates of fruit, vegetables and fat intake from the FFQ were compared with those from the weighed records. RESULTS: Mean intake of vegetables and fruit estimated from the diet records increased with increasing categories for frequency of intake assessed by the FFQ. Spearman correlation coefficient between frequency of intake of vegetables and fruit from the FFQ and amount of these food items estimated from the weighed records was 0.46 and 0.66, respectively. The ability of the FFQ to predict those having inadequate intake of fruits and vegetables based on weighed record data, was more than 90%. Almost 95% who reported use of fat spreads by the FFQ also reported this by the records. The correlation coefficient between the amount of fat used on bread from the two methods was 0.79. The correlation between fat intake estimated from both methods was 0.36 and for saturated fat intake the correlation was 0.38. CONCLUSION: The FFQ could be used to screen for low consumers of fruit, vegetable and fat spread in intervention programmes. However, the ability of the FFQ to identify persons with high (or low) intake of fat and saturated fat was not good.
PubMed ID
12232961 View in PubMed
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Dietary factors and pulmonary function: a cross sectional study in middle aged men from three European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200529
Source
Thorax. 1999 Nov;54(11):1021-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
C. Tabak
H A Smit
L. Räsänen
F. Fidanza
A. Menotti
A. Nissinen
E J Feskens
D. Heederik
D. Kromhout
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Diseases and Environmental Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
Source
Thorax. 1999 Nov;54(11):1021-6
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antioxidants
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Energy intake
Finland
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Fruit
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Smoking - physiopathology
Vegetables
Abstract
Results of epidemiological studies relating individual dietary factors to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are inconsistent. To evaluate the cross sectional association of dietary factors with pulmonary function, data were collected from middle aged men in three European countries.
The data were collected in the 1960s in Finland (n = 1248), Italy (n = 1386), and the Netherlands (n = 691). Dietary intake was estimated using the cross-check dietary history method. Forced expiratory volume (FEV(0.75) or FEV(1), here called FEV) was measured by spirometry. Associations were adjusted for age, height, smoking, body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption, and energy intake.
FEV was positively associated with intake of vitamin E in Finland, with intake of fruit in Italy, and with intake of beta-carotene in the Netherlands. In all three countries men with intakes of both fruit and vegetables above the median had a higher FEV than those with a low intake of both foods. The difference in FEV ranged from 110 to 169 ml before and from 53 to 118 ml after energy adjustment. Differences in FEV for intake of three antioxidants (vitamins C and E and beta-carotene) above versus below the median ranged from 61 to 181 ml before and from -35 to 58 ml after energy adjustment. Intake of fish was not associated with FEV.
In three European countries a high intake of fruit and vegetables was positively associated with pulmonary function. A high intake of all three antioxidants tended to be positively associated with pulmonary function before, but not after, adjustment for energy intake. Associations of individual antioxidants with pulmonary function were not consistent across countries.
Notes
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PubMed ID
10525562 View in PubMed
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More distinct food intake patterns among women than men in northern Sweden: a population-based survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89959
Source
Nutr J. 2009;8:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Winkvist Anna
Hörnell Agneta
Hallmans Göran
Lindahl Bernt
Weinehall Lars
Johansson Ingegerd
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden. anna.winkvist@nutrition.gu.se
Source
Nutr J. 2009;8:12
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Eating
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Smoking
Sweden
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The need to promote a healthy diet to curb the current obesity epidemic has today been recognized by most countries. A prerequisite for planning and evaluating interventions on dietary intake is the existence of valid information on long-term average dietary intake in a population. Few large, population-based studies of dietary intake have been carried out in Sweden. The largest to date is the Västerbotten Intervention Program (VIP), which was initiated in 1985, with data collection still ongoing. This paper reports on the first comprehensive analyses of the dietary data and presents dietary intake patterns among over 60,000 women and men in northern Sweden during 1992-2005. METHODS: Between 1992 and 2005, 71,367 inhabitants in Västerbotten county aged 30, 40, 50, and 60 years visited their local health care center as part of the VIP. Participants of VIP filled in an 84- or 64-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and provided sociodemographic information. Complete and realistic information on consumption frequency was provided by 62,531 individuals. Food intake patterns were analyzed using K-means cluster analyses. RESULTS: The mean daily energy intake was 6,83 (+/- 1,77) MJ among women and 8,71 (+/- 2,26) MJ among men. More than half of both women and men were classified as Low Energy Reporters (defined as individuals reporting a food intake level below the lower 95% confidence interval limit of the physical activity level). Larger variation in frequency of daily intake was seen among women than among men for most food groups. Among women, four dietary clusters were identified, labeled "Fruit and vegetables", "High fat", "Coffee and sandwich", and "Tea and ice cream". Among men, three dietary clusters were identified, labeled "Fruit and vegetables", "High fat", and "Tea, soda and cookies". CONCLUSION: More distinct food intake patterns were seen among women than men in this study in northern Sweden. Due to large proportions of Low Energy Reporters, our results on dietary intake may not be suitable for comparisons with recommended intake levels. However, the results on food intake patterns should still be valid and useful as a basis for targeting interventions to groups most in need.
PubMed ID
19228378 View in PubMed
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A workplace feasibility study of the effect of a minimal fruit intervention on fruit intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138771
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Aug;14(8):1382-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Sevil Alinia
Anne D Lassen
Kirstine S Krogholm
Tue Christensen
Ole H Hels
Inge Tetens
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, DK-2860 Søborg, Denmark. seva@food.dtu.dk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Aug;14(8):1382-7
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consumer Satisfaction
Denmark
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Vegetables
Workplace
Abstract
The main purpose of the study was to investigate the feasibility of using workplaces to increase the fruit consumption of participants by increasing fruit availability and accessibility by a minimal fruit programme. Furthermore, it was investigated whether a potential increase in fruit intake would affect vegetable, total energy and nutrient intake.
A 5-month, controlled, workplace study where workplaces were divided into an intervention group (IG) and a control group (CG). At least one piece of free fruit was available per person per day in the IG. Total fruit and dietary intake was assessed, using two 24 h dietary recalls at baseline and at endpoint.
Eight Danish workplaces were enrolled in the study. Five workplaces were in the IG and three were in the CG.
One hundred and twenty-four (IG, n 68; CG, n 56) healthy, mainly normal-weight participants were recruited.
Mean daily fruit intake increased significantly from baseline to endpoint only in the IG by 112(se 35) g. In the IG, mean daily intake of added sugar decreased significantly by 10·7(se 4·4) g, whereas mean daily intake of dietary fibre increased significantly by 3·0(se 1·1) g. Vegetable, total energy and macronutrient intake remained unchanged through the intervention period for both groups.
The present study showed that it is feasible to increase the average fruit intake at workplaces by simply increasing fruit availability and accessibility. Increased fruit intake possibly substituted intake of foods containing added sugar. In this study population the increased fruit intake did not affect total energy intake.
PubMed ID
21138609 View in PubMed
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Do descriptive norms related to parents and friends predict fruit and vegetable intake similarly among 11-year-old girls and boys?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271271
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Jan 14;115(1):168-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-2016
Author
Elviira Lehto
Carola Ray
Ari Haukkala
Agneta Yngve
Inga Thorsdottir
Eva Roos
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Jan 14;115(1):168-75
Date
Jan-14-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Child
Diet - standards
Eating
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Friends
Fruit
Humans
Male
Parents
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
We examined whether there are sex differences in children's fruit and vegetable (FV) intake and in descriptive norms (i.e. perceived FV intake) related to parents and friends. We also studied whether friends' impact is as important as that of parents on children's FV intake. Data from the PRO GREENS project in Finland were obtained from 424 children at the age 11 years at baseline. At baseline, 2009 children filled in a questionnaire about descriptive norms conceptualised as perceived FV intake of their parents and friends. They also filled in a validated FFQ that assessed their FV intake both at baseline and in the follow-up in 2010. The associations were examined with multi-level regression analyses with multi-group comparisons. Girls reported higher perceived FV intake of friends and higher own fruit intake at baseline, compared with boys, and higher vegetable intake both at baseline and in the follow-up. Perceived FV intake of parents and friends was positively associated with both girls' and boys' FV intake in both study years. The impact of perceived fruit intake of the mother was stronger among boys. The change in children's FV intake was affected only by perceived FV intake of father and friends. No large sex differences in descriptive norms were found, but the impact of friends on children's FV intake can generally be considered as important as that of parents. Future interventions could benefit from taking into account friends' impact as role models on children's FV intake.
PubMed ID
26450715 View in PubMed
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The Norwegian diet during the last hundred years in relation to coronary heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54664
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1996 May;50(5):277-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1996
Author
Johansson L
Drevon CA
Bjørneboe GEA
Author Affiliation
National Nutrition Council, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1996 May;50(5):277-83
Date
May-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cholesterol - blood
Coffee
Coronary Disease - mortality
Diet - trends
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The influence of dietary changes on serum cholesterol and CHD during the last century in Norway has been evaluated. DESIGN: Data on food consumption are based on national food supply and household consumption surveys. To be able to calculate comparable series of the dietary content of energy, fat, saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids and dietary cholesterol, we compiled food composition data covering this century. The dietary effect on serum cholesterol was estimated by Keys equation. RESULTS: Changes in dietary lipids precede the increase and the decrease in mortality of CHD. The estimated serum cholesterol level in the population increased by approximately 1 mmol/l during 1900-1960, and decreased by approximately 0.6 mmol/l during 1960-1992. These changes correspond to a 60% increase and a 30% decrease in risk for CHD. However, the observed change in mortality of CHD was greater. During 1951-1955 and 1971-1975 it increased by 120% in men and 80% in women aged 50-59 years and during 1971-1975 and 1991-1993 it decreased by 43% and 29%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Change in dietary lipids have the potential to explain a great deal of the changes in mortality of CHD in Norway during this century. A reduced consumption of boiled coffee and an increase in the consumption of antioxidants may also have contributed to the reduced mortality of CHD the last 20 years.
PubMed ID
8735307 View in PubMed
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An after-school snack of raisins lowers cumulative food intake in young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112735
Source
J Food Sci. 2013 Jun;78 Suppl 1:A5-A10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Barkha P Patel
Nick Bellissimo
Bohdan Luhovyy
Lorianne J Bennett
Evelyn Hurton
James E Painter
G Harvey Anderson
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Food Sci. 2013 Jun;78 Suppl 1:A5-A10
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appetite Depressants - administration & dosage
Appetite Regulation
Child
Child Behavior
Energy intake
Female
Food, Preserved
Fruit
Functional Food
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Nova Scotia
Questionnaires
Satiety Response
Snacks
Vitis
Abstract
Snacks are an important part of children's dietary intake, but the role of dried fruit on energy intake in children is unknown. Therefore, the effect of ad libitum consumption of an after-school snack of raisins, grapes, potato chips, and chocolate chip cookies on appetite and energy intake in twenty-six 8- to 11-y-old normal-weight (15th to 85th percentile) children was examined. On 4 separate weekdays, 1 wk apart, children (11 M, 15 F) were given a standardized breakfast, morning snack (apple), and a standardized lunch. After school, children randomly received 1 of 4 ad libitum snacks and were instructed to eat until "comfortably full." Appetite was measured before and 15, 30, and 45 min after snack consumption. Children consumed the least calories from raisins and grapes and the most from cookies (P
PubMed ID
23789934 View in PubMed
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64 records – page 1 of 7.