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Increased consumption of fruit and vegetables and future cancer incidence in selected European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100404
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Sep;46(14):2563-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Isabelle Soerjomataram
Dian Oomen
Valery Lemmens
Anke Oenema
Vassiliki Benetou
Antonia Trichopoulou
Jan Willem Coebergh
Jan Barendregt
Esther de Vries
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. i.soerjomataram@erasmusmc.nl
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Sep;46(14):2563-80
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Forecasting
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Cancer is one of the major causes of death in western countries. Fruit and vegetable consumption may reduce the risk of cancers of the oropharynx, oesophagus, lung, stomach and colorectum. We investigated the potential effect of interventions aimed at increasing the intake of fruits and vegetables to the recommended level (500 g/d) on future cancer incidence in Europe. Data on cancer incidence and daily intake of fruit and vegetables were compiled for France, Germany, The Netherlands, Spain and Sweden. We also performed a meta-analysis of European observational studies to arrive at a quantitative estimate on the association between fruit and vegetable intake and cancer risk. Predictions on the future cancer incidence were modelled using PREVENT 3.01. Our study predicted 212,000 fruit- and vegetable-related cancer cases in these countries in 2050, out of which 398 (0.19%) might be prevented if the 500 g/d fruit and vegetable intake were achieved in the aforementioned countries. The largest absolute impact was observed for lung cancer with 257 (out of 136,517) preventable cases if the intervention was successfully implemented. Sweden would benefit the most from intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption with a 2% reduction in expected cases. Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption has a small impact on reducing the burden of cancer in Europe. Health impact assessment tools such as PREVENT can provide the basis for decision making in chronic disease prevention.
PubMed ID
20843486 View in PubMed
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Implementation of strategies to increase adolescents' access to fruit and vegetables at school: process evaluation findings from the Boost study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266465
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:86
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Anne Kristine Aarestrup
Thea Suldrup Jørgensen
Sanne Ellegaard Jørgensen
Deanna M Hoelscher
Pernille Due
Rikke Krølner
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:86
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Consumer Behavior
Denmark
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Environment
Female
Fruit
Humans
Inservice training
Male
Schools - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Access to fruit and vegetables (FV) is associated with adolescents' FV consumption. However, little is known about implementation of strategies to increase access to FV at schools. We examined the implementation of two environmental components designed to increase access to FV at Danish schools.
We used data from 20 intervention schools involved in the school-based multicomponent Boost trial targeting 13-year-olds' FV consumption. The environmental components at school included daily provision of free FV and promotion of a pleasant eating environment. Questionnaire data was collected by the end of the nine-month intervention period among 1,121 pupils (95%), from all school principals (n?=?20) and half way through the intervention period and by the end of the intervention among 114 teachers (44%). The implementation of the components was examined descriptively using the following process evaluation measures; fidelity, dose delivered, dose received and reach. Schools with stable high implementation levels over time were characterised by context, intervention appreciation and implementation of other components.
For all process evaluation measures, the level of implementation varied by schools, classes and over time. Dose received: 45% of pupils (school range: 13-72%, class range: 7-77%) ate the provided FV daily; 68% of pupils (school range: 40-93%, class range: 24-100%) reported that time was allocated to eating FV in class. Reach: The intake of FV provided did not differ by SEP nor gender, but more girls and low SEP pupils enjoyed eating FV together. Dose delivered: The proportion of teachers offering FV at a daily basis decreased over time, while the proportion of teachers cutting up FV increased over time. Schools in which high proportions of teachers offered FV daily throughout the intervention period were characterized by being: small; having a low proportion of low SEP pupils; having a school food policy; high teacher- and pupil intervention appreciation; having fewer teachers who cut up FV; and having high implementation of educational components.
The appliance of different approaches and levels of analyses to describe data provided comprehension and knowledge of the implementation process. This knowledge is crucial for the interpretation of intervention effect.
Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN11666034.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25881262 View in PubMed
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More distinct food intake patterns among women than men in northern Sweden: a population-based survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89959
Source
Nutr J. 2009;8:12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Winkvist Anna
Hörnell Agneta
Hallmans Göran
Lindahl Bernt
Weinehall Lars
Johansson Ingegerd
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden. anna.winkvist@nutrition.gu.se
Source
Nutr J. 2009;8:12
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Eating
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Smoking
Sweden
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The need to promote a healthy diet to curb the current obesity epidemic has today been recognized by most countries. A prerequisite for planning and evaluating interventions on dietary intake is the existence of valid information on long-term average dietary intake in a population. Few large, population-based studies of dietary intake have been carried out in Sweden. The largest to date is the Västerbotten Intervention Program (VIP), which was initiated in 1985, with data collection still ongoing. This paper reports on the first comprehensive analyses of the dietary data and presents dietary intake patterns among over 60,000 women and men in northern Sweden during 1992-2005. METHODS: Between 1992 and 2005, 71,367 inhabitants in Västerbotten county aged 30, 40, 50, and 60 years visited their local health care center as part of the VIP. Participants of VIP filled in an 84- or 64-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and provided sociodemographic information. Complete and realistic information on consumption frequency was provided by 62,531 individuals. Food intake patterns were analyzed using K-means cluster analyses. RESULTS: The mean daily energy intake was 6,83 (+/- 1,77) MJ among women and 8,71 (+/- 2,26) MJ among men. More than half of both women and men were classified as Low Energy Reporters (defined as individuals reporting a food intake level below the lower 95% confidence interval limit of the physical activity level). Larger variation in frequency of daily intake was seen among women than among men for most food groups. Among women, four dietary clusters were identified, labeled "Fruit and vegetables", "High fat", "Coffee and sandwich", and "Tea and ice cream". Among men, three dietary clusters were identified, labeled "Fruit and vegetables", "High fat", and "Tea, soda and cookies". CONCLUSION: More distinct food intake patterns were seen among women than men in this study in northern Sweden. Due to large proportions of Low Energy Reporters, our results on dietary intake may not be suitable for comparisons with recommended intake levels. However, the results on food intake patterns should still be valid and useful as a basis for targeting interventions to groups most in need.
PubMed ID
19228378 View in PubMed
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Dietary patterns and their associations with home food availability among Finnish pre-school children: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299379
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1232-1242
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018
Author
Henna Vepsäläinen
Liisa Korkalo
Vera Mikkilä
Reetta Lehto
Carola Ray
Kaija Nissinen
Essi Skaffari
Mikael Fogelholm
Leena Koivusilta
Eva Roos
Maijaliisa Erkkola
Author Affiliation
1Department of Food and Environmental Sciences,University of Helsinki, PO Box 66,FI-00014 University of Helsinki,Helsinki,Finland.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1232-1242
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Fruit
Humans
Vegetables
Abstract
To study the associations between home food availability and dietary patterns among pre-school children.
Cross-sectional study in which parents of the participating children filled in an FFQ and reported how often they had certain foods in their homes. We derived dietary pattern scores using principal component analysis, and composite scores describing the availability of fruits and vegetables as well as sugar-enriched foods in the home were created for each participant. We used multilevel models to investigate the associations between availability and dietary pattern scores.
The DAGIS study, Finland.
The participants were 864 Finnish 3-6-year-old children recruited from sixty-six pre-schools. The analyses included 711 children with sufficient data.
We identified three dietary patterns explaining 16·7 % of the variance. The patterns were named 'sweets-and-treats' (high loadings of e.g. sweet biscuits, chocolate, ice cream), 'health-conscious' (high loadings of e.g. nuts, natural yoghurt, berries) and 'vegetables-and-processed meats' (high loadings of e.g. vegetables, cold cuts, fruit). In multivariate models, the availability of fruits and vegetables was inversely associated with the sweets-and-treats pattern (ß=-0·05, P
PubMed ID
29331168 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable intake and rate of heart failure: a population-based prospective cohort of women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266309
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2015 Jan;17(1):20-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Susanne Rautiainen
Emily B Levitan
Murray A Mittleman
Alicja Wolk
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2015 Jan;17(1):20-6
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fruit
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Although numerous studies have investigated fruit and vegetable consumption in association with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) such as coronary heart disease and stroke, a limited number of studies have investigated the association with heart failure. The aim of this study was to assess the association between fruit and vegetable intake and the incidence of heart failure among women.
In September 1997, a total of 34,319 women (aged 49-83 years) from the Swedish Mammography Cohort, free of cancer and CVD at baseline, completed a food-frequency questionnaire. Women were followed for incident heart failure (diagnosis as primary or secondary cause) through December 2011 using administrative health registries. Over 12.9?years of follow-up (442,348 person-years), we identified 3051 incident cases of heart failure. Total fruit and vegetable consumption was inversely associated with the rate of heart failure {the multivariable-adjusted rate ratio (RR) in the highest quintile compared with the lowest was 0.80 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70-0.90]}. Fruit (mutually adjusted for vegetables) were not significantly associated with rate of heart failure (RR 0.94; 95% CI 0.83-1.07), whereas vegetables showed an inverse association (RR 0.83; 95% CI 0.73-0.95). When investigating the shape of association, we found evidence of a non-linear association (P = 0.01), and the lowest rates of heart failure were observed among women consuming =5 servings/day of fruit and vegetables, without further decrease with increasing intake.
In this population-based prospective cohort study of women, higher total consumption of fruit and vegetables was inversely associated with the incidence of heart failure.
PubMed ID
25382356 View in PubMed
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Diet and cancer prevention: Contributions from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100405
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Sep;46(14):2555-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Carlos A Gonzalez
Elio Riboli
Author Affiliation
Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Programme of Epidemilogical Cancer Research, Institut Català d'Oncologia, Av. Gran Via s/n, km 2.7, 08907 L'Hospitalet, Barcelona, Spain. cagonzalez@iconcologia.net
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2010 Sep;46(14):2555-62
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fiber
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Food - statistics & numerical data
Fruit
Humans
Male
Meat products
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Vegetables
Abstract
We present the main findings observed to date from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) on dietary factors associated with the most frequent cancer sites. METHODS: EPIC is a multicentre prospective study carried out in 23 centres in 10 European countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom, including 519,978 participants (366,521 women and 153,457 men), most aged 35-70 years. RESULTS: We observed the following significant associations: gastric cancer risk was inversely associated with high plasma vitamin C, some carotenoids, retinol and a-tocopherol, high intake of cereal fibre and high adhesion to Mediterranean diet, while red and processed meat were associated with increased risk. High intake of dietary fibre, fish, calcium, and plasma vitamin D were associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer, while red and processed meat intake, alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity were associated with an increased risk. High intake of fruit and vegetables in current smokers were associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer. An increased risk of breast cancer was associated with high saturated fat intake and alcohol intake. In postmenopausal women, BMI was positively and physical activity negatively associated with breast cancer risk. High intake of dairy protein and calcium from dairy products and high serum concentration of IGF-I were associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. These results contribute to scientific evidence for appropriate public health strategies and prevention activities aimed at reducing the global cancer burden.
PubMed ID
20843485 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable consumption in adolescence and health in early adulthood: a longitudinal analysis of the statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105528
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:1206
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Yuriko Takaoka
Norito Kawakami
Author Affiliation
School of Integrated Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan. johntakaoka223@gmail.com.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:1206
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study aimed to explore a longitudinal relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption in adolescence and two health-related outcomes (i.e., self-rated health and mental health) in early adulthood in the community.
Data from a longitudinal cohort of the Canadian National Population Health Survey (NPHS) were used. Participants of the 2002/03 survey aged 15-17 years old were followed and surveyed in 2008/09. The number of the sample used in the statistical analyses was 250 (n=250). Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to assess the associations of fruit and vegetable consumption in the adolescence (classified into tertiles) with non-excellent (or poor) self-rated health and poor mental health (defined as having a K6 score of 5+) at follow-up.
After adjusting for sex, age, the highest level of education in household, and the other covariates, participants who consumed fruits and vegetables most frequently at baseline had a significantly smaller odds ratio for being non-excellent self-rated health (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.11, 0.83). No significant associations were found between fruit and vegetable consumption at baseline and poor mental health at follow-up in any model (p>0.05).
The results of this longitudinal study suggest that high fruit and vegetable consumption in adolescence has a beneficial influence on self-rated health in the early adulthood.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24359230 View in PubMed
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Plant foods and the risk of cerebrovascular diseases: a potential protection of fruit consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149373
Source
Br J Nutr. 2009 Oct;102(7):1075-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Anna Mizrahi
Paul Knekt
Jukka Montonen
Maarit A Laaksonen
Markku Heliövaara
Ritva Järvinen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2009 Oct;102(7):1075-83
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cereals
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Stroke - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vegetables
Abstract
Studies on the association between plant foods and cerebrovascular diseases have given contradictory results suggesting the existence of some effect-modifying factors. The present study determines whether the consumption of plant foods (i.e. fruits and berries, vegetables, and cereals) predicts a decreased cerebrovascular disease incidence in a population with low fruit and vegetable and high wholegrain intake. This cohort study on 3932 men and women was based on data from the Finnish Mobile Clinic Health Examination Survey, conducted in 1968-72. The participants were 40-74 years of age and free of cardiovascular diseases at baseline. Data on the plant food consumption were derived from a 1-year dietary history interview. During a 24-year follow-up 625 cases of cerebrovascular diseases occurred, leading to either hospitalisation or death. An inverse association was found between fruit consumption and the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases, ischaemic stroke and intracerebral haemorrhage. The adjusted relative risks (RR) between the highest and lowest quartiles of intake of any cerebrovascular disease, ischaemic stroke and intracerebral haemorrhage were 0.75 (95 % CI 0.59, 0.94), 0.73 (95 % CI 0.54, 1.00) and 0.47 (95 % CI 0.24, 0.92), respectively. These associations were primarily due to the consumption of citrus fruits and occurred only in men. Total consumption of vegetables or cereals was not associated with the cerebrovascular disease incidence. The consumption of cruciferous vegetables, however, predicted a reduced risk of cerebrovascular diseases (RR 0.79; 95 % CI 0.63, 0.99), ischaemic stroke (RR 0.67; 95 % CI 0.49, 0.92) and intracerebral haemorrhage (RR 0.49; 95 % CI 0.25, 0.98). In conclusion, the consumption of fruits, especially citrus, and cruciferous vegetables may protect against cerebrovascular diseases.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Nutr. 2009 Oct;102(7):947-819671202
PubMed ID
19646291 View in PubMed
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Consumption of vegetables at dinner in a cohort of Norwegian adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159009
Source
Appetite. 2008 Jul;51(1):90-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Kristine Vejrup
Nanna Lien
Knut-Inge Klepp
Elling Bere
Author Affiliation
University of Oslo, Department of Nutrition, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Appetite. 2008 Jul;51(1):90-6
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - physiology
Cohort Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Food Supply
Fruit
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Social Class
Vegetables
Abstract
This longitudinal study examined the frequency of consumption of vegetables for dinner by Norwegian adolescents and their parents. Associations of perceived availability, correlations and stability were explored. The longitudinal cohort consist of 1950 adolescents attending 6th/7th (2002) and 9th/10th (2005) grade, and their parents (n=1647). Only 40% of the adolescents and 60% of the adults reported to have eaten vegetables for dinner yesterday, the reported frequency of vegetables for dinner were 3.7 and 4.1 times/week in 2002 and 2005, respectively, and 4.8 times/week for parents. Girls ate more than boys, and high SES adolescents ate more than low SES adolescents. There were significant differences between adolescent and parent report of both frequency of consumption and perceived availability of vegetables for dinner. Adolescent's frequency of consumption of vegetables was related to the parent's consumption, and the adolescent response from 2002 to 2005 showed strong correlations. There were good tracking in the frequency of consumption of vegetables for dinner, and 25% of the adolescents showed a stable high frequency. To conclude, few adolescents and their parents consumed vegetables for dinner. Interventions are needed to meet the recommendations, and parents should be targeted in intervention programs.
PubMed ID
18243413 View in PubMed
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Inadequate dietary intakes among pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123767
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(2):72-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jennifer K Fowler
Susan E Evers
M Karen Campbell
Author Affiliation
Hamilton Family Health Team, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2012;73(2):72-7
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Body mass index
Choice Behavior
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Income
Meat
Milk
Nutritional Status
Ontario
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
Eating behaviours were assessed among pregnant women in a mid-sized Canadian city.
As part of the Prenatal Health Project, we interviewed 2313 pregnant women in London, Ontario. Subjects also completed a food frequency questionnaire. Recruitment took place in ultrasound clinics at 10 to 22 weeks of gestation. The main outcome measures were number of daily servings for each food group, measured against the minimum number recommended by the 2007 Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide (CFG), the proportion of women consuming the recommended number of servings for each and all of the four food groups, and factors associated with adequate consumption. We also determined the number of servings of "other foods." Analysis included descriptive statistics and logistic regression, all at p
PubMed ID
22668840 View in PubMed
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