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Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of hip fracture: a cohort study of Swedish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271214
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2015 Jun;30(6):976-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Liisa Byberg
Andrea Bellavia
Nicola Orsini
Alicja Wolk
Karl Michaëlsson
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2015 Jun;30(6):976-84
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Eating
Fruit
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Dietary guidelines recommend a daily intake of 5 servings of fruits and vegetables. Whether such intakes are associated with a lower risk of hip fracture is at present unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the dose-response association between habitual fruit and vegetable intake and hip fracture in a cohort study based on 40,644 men from the Cohort of Swedish Men (COSM) and 34,947 women from the Swedish Mammography Cohort (SMC) (total n?=?75,591), free from cardiovascular disease and cancer, who answered lifestyle questionnaires in 1997 (age 45 to 83 years). Intake of fruits and vegetables (servings/day) was assessed by food frequency questionnaire and incident hip fractures were retrieved from the Swedish Patient Register (1998 to 2010). The mean follow-up time was 14.2 years. One-third of the participants reported an intake of fruits and vegetables of >5 servings/day, one-third reported >3 to =5 servings/day, 28% reported >1 to =3 servings/day, and 6% reported =1 serving/day. During 1,037,645 person-years we observed 3644 hip fractures (2266 or 62% in women). The dose-response association was found to be strongly nonlinear (p
PubMed ID
25294687 View in PubMed
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Patterns of fruit and vegetable consumption and the influence of sex, age and socio-demographic factors among Canadian elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92579
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2008 Apr;27(2):306-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Riediger Natalie D
Moghadasian Mohammed H
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, and St. Boniface Hospital Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. nriediger@sbrc.ca
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2008 Apr;27(2):306-13
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to: 1) describe the patterns of fruit and vegetable (f&v) intake in Canadian elderly and 2) identify socio-demographic factors that were associated with the low consumption. METHODS: Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey cycle 2.1 (2003), Public Use File, were used. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS 11.5 for Windows. Total f&v intake of Canadian elderly (65 years and older) was cross-tabulated between four age groups, by gender, level of household education, total household income, ethnicity, marital status, and geographical locations. RESULTS: Our data revealed that 47% of Canadian elderly sample consume f&v equal to or greater than five times daily. A strong positive association was found between f&v consumption and total household income and highest household education. Gender and marital status were other important contributing factors for f&v intake among elderly. Ethnicity did not influence f&v intake. Younger males reported to consume less f&v than older males did, but consumption of f&v was comparable among all four age groups of females. Elderly living in the Maritime Provinces and the Yukon/Northwest Territories/Nunavut had a lower level of f&v consumption, as compared to elderly living in other provinces. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that >50% of Canadian elderly do not consume f&v five or more times per day. Gender and several socio-demographic factors significantly influence f&v intake in Canadian elderly. Further studies warrant identifying at risk elderly groups and implementing programs to encourage adequate f&v intake by Canadian elderly.
PubMed ID
18689563 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable intake and rate of heart failure: a population-based prospective cohort of women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266309
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2015 Jan;17(1):20-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Susanne Rautiainen
Emily B Levitan
Murray A Mittleman
Alicja Wolk
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2015 Jan;17(1):20-6
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fruit
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Although numerous studies have investigated fruit and vegetable consumption in association with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) such as coronary heart disease and stroke, a limited number of studies have investigated the association with heart failure. The aim of this study was to assess the association between fruit and vegetable intake and the incidence of heart failure among women.
In September 1997, a total of 34,319 women (aged 49-83 years) from the Swedish Mammography Cohort, free of cancer and CVD at baseline, completed a food-frequency questionnaire. Women were followed for incident heart failure (diagnosis as primary or secondary cause) through December 2011 using administrative health registries. Over 12.9?years of follow-up (442,348 person-years), we identified 3051 incident cases of heart failure. Total fruit and vegetable consumption was inversely associated with the rate of heart failure {the multivariable-adjusted rate ratio (RR) in the highest quintile compared with the lowest was 0.80 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70-0.90]}. Fruit (mutually adjusted for vegetables) were not significantly associated with rate of heart failure (RR 0.94; 95% CI 0.83-1.07), whereas vegetables showed an inverse association (RR 0.83; 95% CI 0.73-0.95). When investigating the shape of association, we found evidence of a non-linear association (P = 0.01), and the lowest rates of heart failure were observed among women consuming =5 servings/day of fruit and vegetables, without further decrease with increasing intake.
In this population-based prospective cohort study of women, higher total consumption of fruit and vegetables was inversely associated with the incidence of heart failure.
PubMed ID
25382356 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause mortality: a dose-response analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112745
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Aug;98(2):454-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Andrea Bellavia
Susanna C Larsson
Matteo Bottai
Alicja Wolk
Nicola Orsini
Author Affiliation
Units of Nutritional Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Aug;98(2):454-9
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Nutrition Assessment
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
The association between fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption and overall mortality has seldom been investigated in large cohort studies. Findings from the few available studies are inconsistent.
The objective was to examine the dose-response relation between FV consumption and mortality, in terms of both time and rate, in a large prospective cohort of Swedish men and women.
FV consumption was assessed through a self-administrated questionnaire in a population-based cohort of 71,706 participants (38,221 men and 33,485 women) aged 45-83 y. We performed a dose-response analysis to evaluate 10th survival percentile differences (PDs) by using Laplace regression and estimated HRs by using Cox regression.
During 13 y of follow-up, 11,439 deaths (6803 men and 4636 women) occurred in the cohort. In comparison with 5 servings FV/d, a lower consumption was progressively associated with shorter survival and higher mortality rates. Those who never consumed FV lived 3 y shorter (PD: -37 mo; 95% CI: -58, -16 mo) and had a 53% higher mortality rate (HR: 1.53; 95% CI: 1.19, 1.99) than did those who consumed 5 servings FV/d. Consideration of fruit and vegetables separately showed that those who never consumed fruit lived 19 mo shorter (PD: -19 mo; 95% CI: -29, -10 mo) than did those who ate 1 fruit/d. Participants who consumed 3 vegetables/d lived 32 mo longer than did those who never consumed vegetables (PD: 32 mo; 96% CI: 13, 51 mo).
FV consumption
PubMed ID
23803880 View in PubMed
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The relationships between food group consumption, self-rated health, and life satisfaction of community-dwelling canadian older men: the manitoba follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151790
Source
J Nutr Elder. 2009 Apr;28(2):158-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Christina O Lengyel
Robert B Tate
Amy K Obirek Blatz
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. lengyel@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
J Nutr Elder. 2009 Apr;28(2):158-73
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Diet - psychology - standards
Diet Surveys
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Health status
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Nutritional Status
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation nested within a long-term cohort study that was designed to examine the relationship between frequency of food group consumption (FGC), self-rated health, and life satisfaction of community-dwelling older men in the Manitoba Follow-up Study. Questionnaires returned from 1,211 Canadian male participants contained frequency of FGC (daily, most days, or rarely), self-reported nutrition, and health-related perceptions. Men consuming vegetables/fruit (V&F) daily versus rarely were four times more likely to report better self-rated health OR = 4.00 (95%CI = 1.31, 12.3) and three times more likely to rate greater life satisfaction OR = 3.08 (95%CI = 1.00, 9.45). Our findings indicate that frequent consumption of V&F is associated with the perception of better health and greater life satisfaction.
PubMed ID
21184363 View in PubMed
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Association of fast-food restaurant and fruit and vegetable store densities with cardiovascular mortality in a metropolitan population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141001
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2010 Oct;25(10):711-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Mark Daniel
Catherine Paquet
Nathalie Auger
Geng Zang
Yan Kestens
Author Affiliation
Sansom Institute for Health Research, The University of South Australia, North Terrace, Adelaide, SA, Australia. mark.daniel@unisa.edu.au
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2010 Oct;25(10):711-9
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Fast Foods - supply & distribution
Female
Fruit - supply & distribution
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Urban Population
Vegetables - supply & distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
Most studies that link neighbourhoods to disease outcomes have represented neighbourhoods as area-level socioeconomic status. Where objective contextual attributes of urban environments have been measured, few studies of food availability have evaluated mortality as an outcome. We sought to estimate associations between the availability of fast-food restaurants (FFR), fruit and vegetable stores (FVS), and cardiovascular mortality in an urban area. Food business data were extracted from a validated commercial database containing all businesses and services in the Montréal Census Metropolitan Area (MCMA). Mortality data (1999-2003) were obtained for the MCMA (3.4 million residents). Directly standardised mortality rates for cardiovascular deaths (n = 30,388) and non-cardiovascular deaths (all causes - cardiovascular deaths) (n = 91,132) and FFR and FVS densities (n/km²) were analysed for 845 census tracts. Generalised additive models and generalised linear models were used to analyse food source-mortality relationships. FVS density was not associated with cardiovascular or non-cardiovascular mortality (relative risk (RR) = 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.76, 1.36, and RR = 1.14, 95% CI: 0.87, 1.50, respectively). Higher FFR density was associated with mortality in bivariate and multivariable analyses. Relative risks of death (95% CI) per 10% increase in FFR density were similar for both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality: 1.39 (1.19, 1.63) and 1.36 (1.18, 1.57), respectively, accounting for socio-demographic covariates. FFR density is associated with cardiovascular mortality but this relationship is no different in magnitude than that for non-cardiovascular mortality. These results together with null associations between FVS density and mortality do not support a major role for food source availability in cardiovascular outcomes.
PubMed ID
20821254 View in PubMed
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Erectile dysfunction and fruit/vegetable consumption among diabetic Canadian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105881
Source
Urology. 2013 Dec;82(6):1330-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Feng Wang
Sulan Dai
Mingdong Wang
Howard Morrison
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: feng.Wang@phac-aspc.gc.ca.
Source
Urology. 2013 Dec;82(6):1330-5
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications
Diet
Erectile Dysfunction - complications - prevention & control
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the association between fruit/vegetable consumption and erectile dysfunction (ED) among Canadian men with diabetes.
Data from the 2011 Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada - Diabetes Component were analyzed using Statistical Analysis System Enterprise Guide (SAS EG). Respondents were asked a series questions related to their sociodemographics, lifestyle, and chronic health conditions. The association between fruit/vegetable consumption and ED was examined using logistic regression after controlling for potential confounding factors. Bootstrap procedure was used to estimate sample distribution and calculate confidence intervals.
Overall, 26.2% of respondents reported having ED. The prevalence increased with age and duration of diabetes. Compared with respondents without ED, those with ED were more likely to be obese, smokers, physically inactive, and either divorced, widowed, or separated. Diabetes complications such as nerve damage, circulation problems, and kidney failure or kidney disease were also significantly associated with ED. After controlling for potential confounding factors, a 10% risk reduction of ED was found with each additional daily serving of fruit/vegetable consumed.
ED is common among Canadian men with diabetes. ED was highly associated with age, duration of diabetes, obesity, smoking, and the presence of other diabetes-related complications. Fruit and vegetable consumption might have a protective effect against ED.
PubMed ID
24295250 View in PubMed
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Dietary flavonoids and the risk of lung cancer and other malignant neoplasms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207880
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Aug 1;146(3):223-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-1997
Author
P. Knekt
R. Järvinen
R. Seppänen
M. Hellövaara
L. Teppo
E. Pukkala
A. Aromaa
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Aug 1;146(3):223-30
Date
Aug-1-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Diet Surveys
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Fruit
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Flavonoids are effective antioxidants and, in theory, may provide protection against cancer, although direct human evidence of this is scarce. The relation between the intake of antioxidant flavonoids and subsequent risk of cancer was studied among 9,959 Finnish men and women aged 15-99 years and initially cancer free. Food consumption was estimated by the dietary history method, covering the total habitual diet during the previous year. During a follow-up in 1967-1991, 997 cancer cases and 151 lung cancer cases were diagnosed. An inverse association was observed between the intake of flavonoids and incidence of all sites of cancer combined. The sex- and age-adjusted relative risk of all sites of cancer combined between the highest and lowest quartiles of flavonoid intake was 0.80 (95% confidence interval 0.67-0.96). This association was mainly a result of lung cancer, which presented a corresponding relative risk of 0.54 (95% confidence interval 0.34-0.87). The association between flavonoid intake and lung cancer incidence was not due to the intake of antioxidant vitamins or other potential confounding factors, as adjustment for factors such as smoking and intakes of energy, vitamin E, vitamin C, and beta-carotene did not materially alter the results. The association was strongest in persons under 50 years of age and in nonsmokers with relative risks of 0.33 (95% confidence interval 0.15-0.77) and 0.13 (95% confidence interval 0.03-0.58), respectively. Of the major dietary flavonoid sources, the consumption of apples showed an inverse association with lung cancer incidence, with a relative risk of 0.42 (95% confidence interval 0.23-0.76) after adjustment for the intake of other fruits and vegetables. The results are in line with the hypothesis that flavonoid intake in some circumstances may be involved in the cancer process, resulting in lowered risks.
PubMed ID
9247006 View in PubMed
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Dietary intakes of nitrate, nitrite and NDMA in the Finnish Mobile Clinic Health Examination Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211599
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1996 Jul;13(5):541-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
Dich, J
Järvinen, R
Knekt, P
Penttilä, PL
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Radiumbemmet, Karolinska Hospital and Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Food Addit Contam. 1996 Jul;13(5):541-52
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Cheese
Diet
Dimethylnitrosamine - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Fishes
Fruit
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Meat products
Middle Aged
Nitrates - administration & dosage
Nitrites - administration & dosage
Vegetables
Abstract
Concern about potential health hazards of nitrate, nitrite and N-nitroso compounds necessitates calculations of exposures to these compounds and their distribution in normal populations. This study describes dietary intake of nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-) and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) among 5304 adult men and 4750 women, who participated in the Finnish Mobile Clinic Health Examination Survey in 1967-72. Food consumption data for each individual over the preceding year were collected by a dietary history interview. Intakes of nitrate, nitrite and NDMA from vegetables, fruits, cheese, meat and fish products were calculated using available values mainly derived from Finland and other countries in northern Europe. Nitrate and nitrite from drinking water were not included in the study. Mean daily dietary intake of nitrate was 77 mg, of nitrite 5.3 mg, and of NDMA 0.05 microgram respectively. Intake of NDMA from beer, estimated in a part of the study population, was 0.07 microgram per day. More than 90% of dietary nitrate was derived from vegetables, including potatoes. Nitrite was mainly provided by cured meat products. Cured meat products and smoked and salted fish were important food sources of NDMA. The total daily intake of nitrate was similar in men and women, whereas intakes of nitrite and NDMA were higher in men than in women. The diet of farmers was characterized by lower amounts of nitrate, nitrite and NDMA, whereas white collar workers and those employed in industry had higher intakes. Current smokers were exposed to higher dietary intakes of nitrate, nitrite and NDMA than non-smokers. Intakes of dietary nitrate, nitrite and NDMA estimated on an individual level are suggested to be useful in evaluating the health effects of these compounds in epidemiological studies.
PubMed ID
8799716 View in PubMed
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Long-term consumption of fruits and vegetables and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a prospective cohort study of women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300934
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 12 01; 47(6):1897-1909
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-01-2018
Author
Joanna Kaluza
Holly R Harris
Anders Linden
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, SE 171-77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 12 01; 47(6):1897-1909
Date
12-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Fruits and vegetables, due to high antioxidant capacity, may protect the lung from oxidative damage caused by tobacco smoke and potentially prevent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Only one study based on baseline diet has examined fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to risk of COPD, and no previous studies have examined long-term diet.
We investigated whether long-term fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with COPD incidence among 34?739 women (age 48-83?years) in the population-based prospective Swedish Mammography Cohort. Fruit and vegetable consumption was assessed twice (1987, 1997) with a self-administered questionnaire. Cases of COPD were identified by linkage to the Swedish health register. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
During follow-up from 2002 to 2014, 1512 women were diagnosed with COPD. Long-term fruit was associated with lower risk of COPD; women in the highest vs lowest quintile of consumption (=2.5 vs
PubMed ID
30239739 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.