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The Grocery Store Food Environment in Northern Greenland and Its Implications for the Health of Reproductive Age Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297964
Source
J Community Health. 2018 02; 43(1):175-185
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
02-2018
Author
Zoe A Watson
Carmen Byker Shanks
Mary P Miles
Elizabeth Rink
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Human Development, Montana State University, P.O. Box 173540, Bozeman, MT, 59717-3540, USA. zoealvira.watson@gmail.com.
Source
J Community Health. 2018 02; 43(1):175-185
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Adult
Female
Food Supply
Fruit
Greenland
Humans
Nutrition Policy
Vegetables
Women's health
Abstract
The population of Greenland is diminishing and environmental and social shifts implicate food availability and the health of reproductive age women. There is little knowledge of the grocery store food environment in Greenland. To address this gap and provide baseline information the present study measured food availability in five grocery stores in northern Greenland. As well, 15 interviews were conducted with reproductive age women, three grocery store managers were interviewed and one interview was conducted with a food distribution manager. Results show few fresh fruits and vegetables are available in grocery stores and in some stores no fresh foods are available. In Kullorsuaq, the primary location for this study, the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey in Stores score in spring 2016 was (3/30) and the Freedman Grocery Store Survey Score was (11/49). Interview results highlight a need to increase communication within the food system and to tailor food distribution policies to the Arctic context with longer term planning protocols for food distribution. These findings can be used to inform future food store environment research in Greenland and for informing policies that improve healthful food availability in grocery stores in northern Greenland.
PubMed ID
28689340 View in PubMed
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[Role of environmental factors in the transmission mechanism of ascariasis in the Pochepskii district of the Bryansk region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109016
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1971 Mar-Apr;40(2):155-7
Publication Type
Article

Qualitative investigation of differences in benefits and challenges of eating fruits versus vegetables as perceived by Canadian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174885
Source
J Nutr Educ Behav. 2005 Mar-Apr;37(2):77-82
Publication Type
Article
Author
Judith Paisley
Sandy Skrzypczyk
Author Affiliation
School of Nutrition, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5B 2K5. j2paisle@ryerson.ca
Source
J Nutr Educ Behav. 2005 Mar-Apr;37(2):77-82
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Eating - psychology
Female
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Ontario
Tape Recording
Vegetables
Abstract
This study examined the perceived differences in benefits and challenges relating to fruit versus vegetable consumption among a purposive, convenience sample of Canadian women.
This inductive, qualitative study involved 8 semistructured group interviews conducted by an experienced moderator.
Interviews were conducted at public health units in southern Ontario.
Forty-seven women, aged 20 to 44 years, were recruited through existing community programs and newspaper advertisements.
The constant comparison method of data analysis was used to identify overarching themes.
Five themes were identified: (1) fruits "fill the gap between meals" (the main benefit); (2) concern about "pesticides and parasites and bacteria"; and (3) "How can something look so good and have no taste?" (main challenges of eating fruit); (4) vegetables make meals "appealing" (main benefit); and (5) the "social" dimension of eating vegetables (main challenge).
Participants readily described different benefits and challenges relating to consumption of fruits versus vegetables. Tailored nutrition messages addressing perceived differences in the benefits and challenges for eating fruits versus vegetables may be needed to encourage increased consumption of these foods. Further research can determine whether these perceptions are widely held.
PubMed ID
15882483 View in PubMed
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Laypeople blog about fruit and vegetables for self-expression and dietary influence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134797
Source
Health Commun. 2011 Oct;26(7):621-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Anna-Mari Simunaniemi
Helena Sandberg
Agneta Andersson
Margaretha Nydahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics, University of Uppsala, Sweden. anna-mari.simunaniemi@ikv.uu.se
Source
Health Commun. 2011 Oct;26(7):621-30
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Blogging
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Motivation
Sex Factors
Sweden
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
Private health information websites run by laypeople are more often visited than websites of official agencies. Understanding the role of weblogs in dietetic communication-i.e., sharing personal perceptions on healthy eating-is still lacking. This study aims to describe the nature of noncommercial Swedish blogs with fruits and vegetables (F&V)-related content and to identify different blogger types. A qualitative content analysis with abduction was performed on 50 weblogs. Most bloggers presented themselves as women. Only one-third reported their age (range 17 to over 50 years). The bloggers had either an active or passive influential purpose, and they approached F&V through either lived or mediated experiences. From these two dimensions, four F&V blogger ideal types were identified: the Persuader, the Authority, the Exhibitionist, and the Mediator. Particularly women wrote about their lived experiences close to the personal level, whereas men were more equally distributed across the different ideal types. Self-expression (typical for the Exhibitionist) and purpose to influence others' diets (typical for the Persuader and the Authority) were frequently expressed in these weblogs. The current findings on blogging purposes, approaches, and F&V blogger types may help to improve online dietetic communication, which sets new challenges for media strategies of health and nutritional professionals.
PubMed ID
21541865 View in PubMed
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From the Centers for Disease Control. Multistate outbreak of Salmonella poona infections--United States and Canada, 1991.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225706
Source
JAMA. 1991 Sep 4;266(9):1189-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-4-1991

Multistate outbreak of Salmonella poona infections--United States and Canada, 1991.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225865
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1991 Aug 16;40(32):549-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-16-1991
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1991 Aug 16;40(32):549-52
Date
Aug-16-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Disease Outbreaks
Fruit - poisoning
Humans
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
During June and July 1991, more than 400 laboratory-confirmed infections with Salmonella poona occurred in 23 states and in Canada. This report describes several investigations that indicated this was a large nationwide outbreak related to consumption of cantaloupes.
PubMed ID
1861671 View in PubMed
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The association of income with fresh fruit and vegetable consumption at different levels of education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145988
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar;64(3):324-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
T. Lallukka
J. Pitkäniemi
O. Rahkonen
E. Roos
M. Laaksonen
E. Lahelma
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. tea.lallukka@helsinki.fi
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar;64(3):324-7
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet Surveys
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Fruit - economics
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Vegetables - economics
Abstract
This study examined whether the association of household income with fresh fruit and vegetable consumption varies by the level of education. Data were derived from mail surveys carried out during 2000-2002 among 40- to 60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki (n=8960, response rate 67%). Education was categorized into three levels, and the household income was divided into quartiles weighted by household size. The outcome was consumption of fresh fruit and vegetables at least twice a day (58% among women and 33% among men). Beta-binomial regression analysis was used. Among women, higher income resulted in equally higher consumption of fruit and vegetables at all educational levels, that is, similar among those with low, intermediate and high education. Among men, the pattern was otherwise similar; however, men with intermediate education differed from those with low education. We conclude that the absolute cost of healthy food is likely to have a role across all income groups.
PubMed ID
20087380 View in PubMed
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Do we know how much we put on the plate? Assessment of the accuracy of self-estimated versus weighed vegetables and whole grain portions using an Intelligent Buffet at the FoodScape Lab.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261861
Source
Appetite. 2014 Oct;81:162-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
T R Nørnberg
L. Houlby
L N Jørgensen
C. He
F J A Pérez-Cueto
Source
Appetite. 2014 Oct;81:162-7
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cereals
Denmark
Diet
Energy intake
Feeding Behavior
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Meals
Portion Size
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of self-estimated vegetable and whole grain serving sizes in a self-served buffet meal. The study took place in a laboratory setting where an Intelligent Buffet was used to register the exact weight of each food type that was self-served by each participant. The initial sample consisted of 58 participants recruited from Aalborg University in Copenhagen, of which 52 participants (59% male) provided complete estimates on the weight of whole grains and 49 participants (63% male) provided complete estimates on the weight of vegetable servings in their meal. The majority of the participants were students aged 20-29?years (85% for whole grain responses and 82% for vegetable responses). Significant differences between self-estimated and actual portion size estimates were observed for both vegetables and whole grains (P??0.05). In conclusion, the participants' ability to accurately assess the serving size of vegetables and whole grains in a self-served meal did not correspond with the actual amount served. This may have implications for consumer interpretation of dietary recommendations used in nutrition interventions in Denmark.
PubMed ID
24928435 View in PubMed
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Socio-economic differences in the consumption of vegetables, fruit and berries in Russian and Finnish Karelia: 1992-2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145963
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2011 Feb;21(1):35-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Laura Paalanen
Ritva Prättälä
Hannele Palosuo
Tiina Laatikainen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. laura.paalanen@thl.fi
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2011 Feb;21(1):35-42
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Female
Finland
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Russia
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Food habits and their socio-economic differences in Russia have rarely been compared to those in western countries. Our aim was to determine socio-economic differences and their changes in the consumption of vegetables, fruit and berries in two neighbouring areas: the district of Pitkäranta in the Republic of Karelia, Russia, and North Karelia, Finland.
Cross-sectional risk factor surveys in Pitkäranta, in 1992, 1997, 2002 and 2007 (1144 men, 1528 women) and in North Karelia, in 1992, 1997 and 2002 (2049 men, 2316 women), were carried out. Data collected with a self-administered questionnaire were analysed with logistic regression.
The consumption of fruit and vegetables was more common in North Karelia than in Pitkäranta, but increased markedly in Pitkäranta from 1992 to 2007. In Pitkäranta, women, and in North Karelia both men and women with higher education ate fresh vegetables more often than those with a lower education. In both areas, daily consumption of fruit tended to be more common among subjects with a higher education. In Pitkäranta, there were virtually no differences by employment status. In North Karelia, vegetable consumption was less common among the unemployed than the employed subjects. Only minor socio-economic differences in berry consumption were observed. The educational differences in vegetable consumption seemed to widen in Pitkäranta and narrow in North Karelia.
A converging trend was observed, with the Russian consumption levels and socio-economic differences starting to approach those observed in Finland. This may be partly explained by the improvements in availability and affordability of fruit and vegetables in Pitkäranta.
PubMed ID
20089679 View in PubMed
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Low intake of fruits, berries and vegetables is associated with excess mortality in men: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187153
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jan;133(1):199-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Tiina H Rissanen
Sari Voutilainen
Jyrki K Virtanen
Birgitta Venho
Meri Vanharanta
Jaakko Mursu
Jukka T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Jan;133(1):199-204
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Diet
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Diets rich in fruits and vegetables have been of interest because of their potential health benefits against chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. The aim of this work was to assess the association of the dietary intake of a food group that includes fruits, berries and vegetables with all-cause, CVD-related and non-CVD-related mortality. The subjects were Finnish men aged 42-60 y examined in 1984-1989 in the prospective Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) Study. Dietary intakes were assessed by 4-d food intake record during the baseline phase of the KIHD Study. The risk of all-cause and non-CVD-related deaths was studied in 2641 men and the risk of CVD-related death in 1950 men who had no history of CVD at baseline. During a mean follow-up time of 12.8 y, cardiovascular as well as noncardiovascular and all-cause mortality were lower among men with the highest consumption of fruits, berries and vegetables. After adjustment for the major CVD risk factors, the relative risk for men in the highest fifth of fruit, berry and vegetable intake for all-cause death, CVD-related and non-CVD-related death was 0.66 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-0.88], 0.59 (0.33-1.06), and 0.68 (0.46-1.00), respectively, compared with men in the lowest fifth. These data show that a high fruit, berry and vegetable intake is associated with reduced risk of mortality in middle-aged Finnish men. Consequently, the findings of this work indicate that diets that are rich in plant-derived foods can promote longevity.
PubMed ID
12514290 View in PubMed
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228 records – page 1 of 23.