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Changes in fruit and vegetable consumption habits from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy among Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289259
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 04 04; 17(1):107
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-04-2017
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elling Bere
Linda R Sagedal
Ingvild Vistad
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sports and Nutrition, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604, Kristiansand, Norway. marianne.skreden@uia.no.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2017 04 04; 17(1):107
Date
04-04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - methods
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Fruit and Vegetable Juices
Habits
Humans
Incidence
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Education as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy outcome
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Single-Blind Method
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Women's health
Young Adult
Abstract
A healthy diet is important for pregnancy outcome and the current and future health of woman and child. The aims of the study were to explore the changes from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy in consumption of fruits and vegetables (FV), and to describe associations with maternal educational level, body mass index (BMI) and age.
Healthy nulliparous women were included in the Norwegian Fit for Delivery (NFFD) trial from September 2009 to February 2013, recruited from eight antenatal clinics in southern Norway. At inclusion, in median gestational week 15 (range 9-20), 575 participants answered a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) where they reported consumption of FV, both current intake and recollection of pre-pregnancy intake. Data were analysed using a linear mixed model.
The percentage of women consuming FV daily or more frequently in the following categories increased from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy: vegetables on sandwiches (13 vs. 17%, p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
28376732 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sea buckthorn decreases and delays insulin response and improves glycaemic profile following a sucrose-containing berry meal: a randomised, controlled, crossover study of Danish sea buckthorn and strawberries in overweight and obese male subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299667
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2018 Dec; 57(8):2827-2837
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Maria Wichmann Mortensen
Camilla Spagner
Catalina Cuparencu
Arne Astrup
Anne Raben
Lars Ove Dragsted
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, 1958, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2018 Dec; 57(8):2827-2837
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Appetite
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body mass index
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Fragaria
Fruit
Hippophae
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Meals
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - diet therapy
Overweight - blood - diet therapy
Postprandial Period
Single-Blind Method
Sucrose - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Berries and mixed berry products exert acute effects on postprandial glycaemia and insulinemia, but very few berries have been studied, and primarily in normal weight subjects. Sea buckthorn and strawberry are compositionally widely different berries and may likely produce different responses. The effects of strawberry and sea buckthorn on postprandial glycaemia and insulinemia were examined in overweight or obese male subjects. Subjective appetite sensations and ad libitum intake were also examined.
The study was conducted as a randomised, controlled, single-blinded, three-way crossover study. Eighteen subjects were studied in three 2-h meal tests followed by a subsequent ad libitum meal. Test meals contained added sucrose and either sea buckthorn, strawberry or no berries with added fructose (control). Blood samples were collected at t?=?0, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min. Subjective appetite sensations were recorded at t?=?0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 140 min and subsequent ad libitum intake was recorded. Statistical differences in all continuous measures were evaluated based on the existence of a meal or a time-meal interaction by repeated measures linear model analyses or by differences in AUC by linear mixed models.
None of the berries affected postprandial glucose. However, sea buckthorn improved glycaemic profile (44.7%, p?
PubMed ID
29022100 View in PubMed
Less detail

Success in Achieving the Targets of the 20-Year Infancy-Onset Dietary Intervention: Association With Insulin Sensitivity and Serum Lipids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296554
Source
Diabetes Care. 2018 10; 41(10):2236-2244
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2018
Author
Tomi T Laitinen
Joel Nuotio
Markus Juonala
Harri Niinikoski
Suvi Rovio
Jorma S A Viikari
Tapani Rönnemaa
Costan G Magnussen
Eero Jokinen
Hanna Lagström
Antti Jula
Olli Simell
Olli T Raitakari
Katja Pahkala
Author Affiliation
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland tomi.laitinen@utu.fi.
Source
Diabetes Care. 2018 10; 41(10):2236-2244
Date
10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Atherosclerosis - diet therapy - prevention & control
Child
Child Health - standards
Child, Preschool
Coronary Disease - blood - diet therapy - physiopathology - prevention & control
Counseling
Diet - standards
Diet Records
Dietary Fats
Dietary Fiber
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Fruit
Health promotion
Healthy Diet
Humans
Infant
Insulin Resistance
Lipids - blood
Male
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined whether success in achieving the key targets of an infancy-onset 20-year dietary intervention associated with insulin sensitivity and serum lipids from early childhood to young adulthood.
The sample comprised 941 children participating in the prospective, randomized Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project (STRIP). Dietary counseling was given biannually based on the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations with the main aim to improve the quality of dietary fat in children's diets and the secondary aim to promote intake of vegetables, fruits, and whole-grain products. Food records and serum lipid profile were studied annually from 1 to 20 years of age, and HOMA of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was assessed between 7 and 20 years of age. Meeting the intervention targets for quality of dietary fat was defined as the ratio of saturated fatty acids (SAFA) to monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA + PUFA) 3 g/MJ (RR 1.37 [95% CI 1.04-1.80]). Participants who achieved more targets had lower HOMA-IR, lower concentrations of fasting serum glucose, insulin, LDL cholesterol, and non-HDL cholesterol, and a lower ratio of apolipoprotein (Apo) B/ApoA1 (P values all =0.003).
Achieving the key targets of an infancy-onset 20-year dietary intervention was associated with better insulin sensitivity and serum lipid profile throughout the early life course.
PubMed ID
30072407 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between adherence to the Danish Food-Based Dietary Guidelines and cardiometabolic risk factors in a Danish adult population: the DIPI study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299378
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 03; 119(6):664-673
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Johanne L Arentoft
Camilla Hoppe
Elisabeth W Andersen
Kim Overvad
Inge Tetens
Author Affiliation
1Division of Diet, Disease Prevention and Toxicology,National Food Institute,Technical University of Denmark,2800 Kgs. Lyngby,Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 03; 119(6):664-673
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Sugars - administration & dosage
Exercise
Fatty Acids - administration & dosage
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Quality
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Metabolic Syndrome - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Single-Blind Method
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Waist Circumference
Whole Grains
Abstract
Diet is recognised as one modifiable lifestyle factor for ischaemic heart disease (IHD). We aimed at investigating the associations between adherence to the Danish Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG) indicated by a Dietary Quality Index (DQI) and selected cardiometabolic risk factors in a cross-sectional study with 219 Danish adult participants (59 %women; age 31-65years) with a minimum of one self-rated risk marker of IHD. Information regarding diet was obtained using web-based dietary assessment software and adherence to the Danish FBDG was expressed by a DQI calculated from 5 food and nutrient indicators (whole grain, fish, fruit and vegetables, energy from saturated fat and from added sugar). Background information, blood samples and anthropometrics were collected and blood pressure was measured. Linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between DQI and cardiometabolic risk factors. DQI was inversely associated with LDL:HDL ratio and TAG (-0·089 per unit; 95 % CI -0·177, -0·002 and -5 % per unit; 95 % CI -9, 0, respectively) and positively associated with HDL-cholesterol (0·047 mmol/l per unit; 95 % CI 0·007, 0·088). For men, DQI was inversely associated with BMI (-3 %per unit; 95 % CI -5, -1), trunk fat (-1 % per unit; 95 % CI -2, -1), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (-30 % per unit; 95 % CI -41, -16 %), HbA1c (-0·09 % per unit; 95 % CI -0·14, -0·04), insulin (-13 % per unit; 95 % CI -19, -7) and homoeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (-14 % per unit; 95 % CI -21, -7). In women, DQI was positively associated with systolic blood pressure (2·6 mmHg per unit; 95 % CI 0·6, 4·6). In conclusion, higher adherence to the current Danish FBDG was associated with a more beneficial cardiometabolic risk profile in a Danish adult population with a minimum of one self-rated risk factor for IHD.
PubMed ID
29352831 View in PubMed
Less detail