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Socio-economic differences in the consumption of vegetables, fruit and berries in Russian and Finnish Karelia: 1992-2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145963
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2011 Feb;21(1):35-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Laura Paalanen
Ritva Prättälä
Hannele Palosuo
Tiina Laatikainen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. laura.paalanen@thl.fi
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2011 Feb;21(1):35-42
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology
Female
Finland
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Russia
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Food habits and their socio-economic differences in Russia have rarely been compared to those in western countries. Our aim was to determine socio-economic differences and their changes in the consumption of vegetables, fruit and berries in two neighbouring areas: the district of Pitkäranta in the Republic of Karelia, Russia, and North Karelia, Finland.
Cross-sectional risk factor surveys in Pitkäranta, in 1992, 1997, 2002 and 2007 (1144 men, 1528 women) and in North Karelia, in 1992, 1997 and 2002 (2049 men, 2316 women), were carried out. Data collected with a self-administered questionnaire were analysed with logistic regression.
The consumption of fruit and vegetables was more common in North Karelia than in Pitkäranta, but increased markedly in Pitkäranta from 1992 to 2007. In Pitkäranta, women, and in North Karelia both men and women with higher education ate fresh vegetables more often than those with a lower education. In both areas, daily consumption of fruit tended to be more common among subjects with a higher education. In Pitkäranta, there were virtually no differences by employment status. In North Karelia, vegetable consumption was less common among the unemployed than the employed subjects. Only minor socio-economic differences in berry consumption were observed. The educational differences in vegetable consumption seemed to widen in Pitkäranta and narrow in North Karelia.
A converging trend was observed, with the Russian consumption levels and socio-economic differences starting to approach those observed in Finland. This may be partly explained by the improvements in availability and affordability of fruit and vegetables in Pitkäranta.
PubMed ID
20089679 View in PubMed
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Layperson-oriented vs. clinical-based models for prediction of incidence of ischemic stroke: National FINRISK Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129523
Source
Int J Stroke. 2012 Dec;7(8):662-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Qing Qiao
Weiguo Gao
Tiina Laatikainen
Erkki Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. qing.qiao@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Stroke. 2012 Dec;7(8):662-8
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Diet
Epidemiologic Methods
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Stroke - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Vegetables
Abstract
A simplified model not requiring a clinic visit is important for cardiovascular prevention. We compared such a model, with one requiring clinical measurements for prediction of ischemic stroke.
Five population-based Finnish cohorts comprising 14?296 men and 16?065 women aged 25-64 years were randomly recruited from 1982, and followed up using the national registers until the end of the 2007. The final Cox model included age, prior history of diabetes and hypertension, happy marriage, capability to walk 500 m (self-estimate), regular exercise, vegetable/fruit intake, smoking, body mass index, and systolic blood pressure; the layperson-oriented model was developed by taking blood pressure away from the final model.
Four hundred sixty-nine men and 371 women developed ischemic stroke events. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (95% confidence interval) for 10 years incidence of ischemic stroke was 0·817 (0·791-0·843) and 0·813 (0·787-0·839) for the model with and without systolic blood pressure in men and 0·815 (0·782-0·848) and 0·812 (0·779-0·844), respectively, in women (P?>?0·10). The predicted 10-year events rate matched well with the observed one across deciles of the predicted risk in men (?(2) ?=?11·57, 9df, P?=?0·239) and in women (?(2) ?=?11·18, P?=?0·263). The overall net reclassification improvement after adding blood pressure was 8·8% (P?=?0·016) in men and 3·2% (P?=?0·234) in women. The predicted 10-year risk of the ischemic stroke based on global vascular event models that includes coronary heart diseases did not match well with the observed stroke risk.
The layperson model performed as well as the clinical-based one.
PubMed ID
22098944 View in PubMed
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The diet of adolescents can be improved by school intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143191
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jun;13(6A):973-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Ulla Hoppu
Jenni Lehtisalo
Johanna Kujala
Teija Keso
Sini Garam
Heli Tapanainen
Antti Uutela
Tiina Laatikainen
Ulla Rauramo
Pirjo Pietinen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jun;13(6A):973-9
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Diet - standards
Diet Records
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Food Services - standards
Fruit
Health Behavior
Health education
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
School Health Services
Sex Factors
Abstract
To decrease the intake of sucrose, increase the intake of fibre and the consumption of fruit and vegetables among secondary-school pupils.
Intervention study among eighth grade pupils during one school year. Data were collected by questionnaires and from a subgroup of pupils by 48 h dietary recall at baseline in spring 2007 and after the intervention in 2008.
Twelve secondary schools were randomly allocated to intervention (IS) and control schools (CS) within three cities. Intervention included nutrition education and improvement of the food environment focusing particularly on the quality of snacks at school.
A total of 659 pupils completed the questionnaires and the dietary recall was obtained from 287 pupils both at baseline and follow-up.
The frequency of consumption of rye bread increased (P = 0.03) and that of sweets decreased (P = 0.006) among girls in the IS. The intake of sucrose fell among IS pupils, from 12.8 % to 10.5 % of the total energy intake (P = 0.01). Intake of fruit (g/MJ) remained the same in IS, whereas it decreased in CS (P = 0.04).
Sugar intake can be lowered by improving the quality of snacks, but it is more difficult to increase fibre intake and fruit and vegetable consumption unless the content of school lunches can be modified. It is the responsibility of the adults working in schools to create a healthy environment and to make healthy choices easy for pupils.
PubMed ID
20513268 View in PubMed
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Daily Sedentary Time and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: The National FINRISK 2002 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273644
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2015 Jul;12(7):904-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Katja Borodulin
Anja Kärki
Tiina Laatikainen
Markku Peltonen
Riitta Luoto
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2015 Jul;12(7):904-8
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cholesterol - blood
Diet
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Smoking - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Daily sitting time may be a risk factor for incident cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, this has not yet been extensively studied. Our aim was to study the association of total sitting time with the risk of CVD.
Participants (n = 4516, free of CVD at baseline) from the National FINRISK 2002 Study were followed for fatal and nonfatal CVD using national registers. Participants underwent a health examination and completed questionnaires, including total daily sitting time.
During a mean follow-up of 8.6 years, 183 incident CVD cases occurred. Sitting on a typical weekday, at baseline, was statistically significantly associated with fatal and nonfatal incident CVD. The hazard ratios (with 95% confidence intervals, CI) for the total amount of sitting were 1.05 (95% CI, 1.00-1.10) in the age and gender adjusted model and 1.06 (95% CI, 1.01-1.11) in the fully adjusted model, including age, gender, employment status, education, BMI, smoking status, leisure time physical activity, use of vegetables and fruit, alcohol use, blood pressure or its medication, and cholesterol or its medication.
Our findings suggest that total amount of daily sitting is a risk factor for incident CVD. More research is needed to understand the etiology of sedentary behavior and CVD.
PubMed ID
25153761 View in PubMed
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Vegetable and fruit consumption, education and plasma vitamin C concentration in Russian and Finnish Karelia, 1992-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267657
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Oct;17(10):2278-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Laura Paalanen
Ritva Prättälä
Georg Alfthan
Irma Salminen
Tiina Laatikainen
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Oct;17(10):2278-86
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Ascorbic Acid Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology
Educational Status
Epidemiological Monitoring
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Spatio-Temporal Analysis
Vegetables
Abstract
To examine (i) whether the consumption of fresh vegetables, fruit and berries is associated with plasma vitamin C concentration and (ii) educational differences in plasma vitamin C concentration in two neighbouring areas in Russia and Finland.
Cross-sectional risk factor surveys in 1992, 1997 and 2002. Logistic regression analysis was applied to examine the associations of consumption of selected foods and education with plasma vitamin C concentration.
District of Pitkäranta in the Republic of Karelia, Russia and North Karelia, Finland.
Adults aged 25-64 years: 579 men and 612 women in Pitkäranta; 974 men and 642 women in North Karelia.
The plasma vitamin C concentration was strikingly low in Pitkäranta, Russia across the study years. During the 10 years of monitoring, the mean plasma vitamin C concentration among men ranged from 2·5 to 8·0 µmol/l in Pitkäranta, Russia and from 27·1 to 53·9 µmol/l in North Karelia, Finland. In both areas, daily consumption of fruit was most strongly associated with plasma vitamin C, while the association of fresh vegetable consumption with plasma vitamin C was less consistent. Consumption of berries was less important in explaining plasma vitamin C. In Pitkäranta, the plasma vitamin C concentration was lower among respondents in the lowest education group.
Differences in the consumption of fresh vegetables and fruit resulted in notable differences in vitamin C status between Pitkäranta and North Karelia in spring. In comparative settings, knowledge of local food culture and validation pilots are important before conducting large population surveys.
PubMed ID
23987990 View in PubMed
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