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Fruit and vegetable intake and risk of acute coronary syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99436
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul;104(2):248-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Louise Hansen
Lars O Dragsted
Anja Olsen
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Erik B Schmidt
Kim Overvad
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. louhan@cancer.dk
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul;104(2):248-55
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Prospective epidemiological studies have reported that a higher fruit and vegetable intake is associated with a lower risk of CHD. The aim of the present study was to examine associations between fruit and vegetable consumption, in particular the subgroupings citrus fruits, apples and cruciferous vegetables, and the risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). During a median follow-up of 7.7 years, 1075 incident ACS cases were identified among 53 383 men and women, aged 50-64 years at recruitment into the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study in 1993-7. Fruit and vegetable intake was estimated from a validated FFQ, and ACS incidence rate ratios (IRR) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Overall, a tendency towards a lower risk of ACS was observed for both men and women with higher fruit and vegetable consumption. For men, we found an inverse association for apple intake (IRR per 25 g/d: 0.97; 95 % CI 0.94, 0.99). This association was also seen among women, albeit borderline significant. However, a higher risk was seen among women with higher fruit juice intake (IRR per 25 g/d: 1.04; 95 % CI 1.00, 1.08). The present results provide some support for previously observed inverse associations between fresh fruit intake, particularly apples, and ACS risk.
PubMed ID
20178672 View in PubMed
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Intake of dietary fiber, especially from cereal foods, is associated with lower incidence of colon cancer in the HELGA cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131882
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):469-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2012
Author
Louise Hansen
Guri Skeie
Rikard Landberg
Eiliv Lund
Richard Palmqvist
Ingegerd Johansson
Lars O Dragsted
Rikke Egeberg
Nina F Johnsen
Jane Christensen
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark. louhan@cancer.dk
Source
Int J Cancer. 2012 Jul 15;131(2):469-78
Date
Jul-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cereals
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Eating
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
The role of dietary fiber on the risk of colon and rectal cancer has been investigated in numerous studies, but findings have been inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between intake of dietary fiber and risk of incident colon (including distal and proximal colon) and rectal cancer in the prospective Scandinavian HELGA cohort and to determine if fiber source (vegetables, fruits, potatoes, cereals) impacted the association. We included 1,168 incident cases (691 colon, 477 rectal cancer), diagnosed during a median of 11.3 years, among 108,081 cohort members. Sex-specific incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of colon and rectal cancer were related to intake of total or specific fiber source using Cox proportional hazards models. For men, an inverse association was observed between intake of total fiber and the risk of colon cancer per an incremental increase of 10 g day(-1) , IRR (95% CI): 0.74 (0.64-0.86). Intake of cereal fiber per 2 g day(-1) was associated with an IRR of 0.94 (0.91-0.98), which was also seen for intake of cereal fiber from foods with high fiber content (= 5 g per 100 g product), where the IRR per 2 g day(-1) was 0.94 (0.90-0.98). In women, intake of cereal fiber per 2 g day(-1) was also associated with lower risk of colon cancer, 0.97 (0.93-1.00). No clear associations were seen for rectal cancer. Our data indicate a protective role of total and cereal fiber intake, particularly from cereal foods with high fiber content, in the prevention of colon cancer.
PubMed ID
21866547 View in PubMed
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Compliance, tolerability and safety of two antioxidant-rich diets: a randomised controlled trial in male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132562
Source
Br J Nutr. 2011 Aug;106(4):557-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Anette Karlsen
Mette Svendsen
Ingebjørg Seljeflot
Mary-Ann Sommernes
Joseph Sexton
Asgeir Brevik
Iris Erlund
Mauro Serafini
Nasser Bastani
Siv Fagertun Remberg
Grethe I Borge
Monica Hauger Carlsen
Siv Kjølsrud Bøhn
Mari C Myhrstad
Lars O Dragsted
Asim K Duttaroy
Karin Haffner
Petter Laake
Christan A Drevon
Harald Arnesen
Andrew Collins
Serena Tonstad
Rune Blomhoff
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2011 Aug;106(4):557-71
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinidia - adverse effects
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Diet - adverse effects
Diet Records
Fruit - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Oxidative Stress
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Smoking - blood
Abstract
It has been suggested that antioxidants attenuate oxidative stress and prevent oxidative stress-related diseases. Paradoxically, randomised controlled trials (RCT) using pharmacological doses of antioxidant supplements have demonstrated harmful effects in smokers. The aim of the present study was to test the compliance, tolerability and safety of two food-based antioxidant-rich diets in smokers. One of the diets provided antioxidants at levels similar to that used in RCT using supplements which previously have generated harmful effects. The present study followed a randomised, parallel-arm dietary intervention for 8 weeks (n 102) in male smokers (age = 45 years). Participants were randomised to either antioxidant-rich diet, kiwi fruit or control groups. The antioxidant-rich foods provided about 300 mmol antioxidants/week from a wide range of plant-based food items. The kiwi fruit group consumed three kiwi fruits/d. Compliance to both diets was good. Only mild, undesirable events were reported by a minority of the participants. The safety of both diets was demonstrated as no potentially harmful or pro-oxidative effects were observed. In the antioxidant-rich diet group, the mean intake of antioxidants increased from 30 mmol/d at baseline to 62 mmol/d during the intervention. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that male smokers can comply with two food-based antioxidant-rich diets. Furthermore, the present study is the first to demonstrate the tolerability and safety of dietary antioxidants at levels similar to dosages provided in RCT using supplements. Such diets may be useful in future studies investigating whether dietary antioxidants may reduce oxidative stress and related diseases.
PubMed ID
21806852 View in PubMed
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New Nordic Diet versus Average Danish Diet: A Randomized Controlled Trial Revealed Healthy Long-Term Effects of the New Nordic Diet by GC-MS Blood Plasma Metabolomics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287403
Source
J Proteome Res. 2016 Jun 03;15(6):1939-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-03-2016
Author
Bekzod Khakimov
Sanne Kellebjerg Poulsen
Francesco Savorani
Evrim Acar
Gözde Gürdeniz
Thomas M Larsen
Arne Astrup
Lars O Dragsted
Søren Balling Engelsen
Source
J Proteome Res. 2016 Jun 03;15(6):1939-54
Date
Jun-03-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Denmark
Diet - methods - standards
Edible Grain
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Fruit
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Metabolome
Metabolomics - methods
Middle Aged
Obesity - diet therapy
Plasma - chemistry - metabolism
Seafood
Seasons
Sex Factors
Vegetables
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
A previous study has shown effects of the New Nordic Diet (NND) to stimulate weight loss and lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure in obese Danish women and men in a randomized, controlled dietary intervention study. This work demonstrates long-term metabolic effects of the NND as compared with an Average Danish Diet (ADD) in blood plasma and reveals associations between metabolic changes and health beneficial effects of the NND including weight loss. A total of 145 individuals completed the intervention and blood samples were taken along with clinical examinations before the intervention started (week 0) and after 12 and 26 weeks. The plasma metabolome was measured using GC-MS, and the final metabolite table contained 144 variables. Significant and novel metabolic effects of the diet, resulting weight loss, gender, and intervention study season were revealed using PLS-DA and ASCA. Several metabolites reflecting specific differences in the diets, especially intake of plant foods and seafood, and in energy metabolism related to ketone bodies and gluconeogenesis formed the predominant metabolite pattern discriminating the intervention groups. Among NND subjects, higher levels of vaccenic acid and 3-hydroxybutanoic acid were related to a higher weight loss, while higher concentrations of salicylic, lactic, and N-aspartic acids and 1,5-anhydro-d-sorbitol were related to a lower weight loss. Specific gender and seasonal differences were also observed. The study strongly indicates that healthy diets high in fish, vegetables, fruit, and whole grain facilitated weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity by increasing ketosis and gluconeogenesis in the fasting state.
PubMed ID
27146725 View in PubMed
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