Skip header and navigation

Refine By

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Changing dietary patterns in the Canadian Arctic: frequency of consumption of foods and beverages by inuit in three Nunavut communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104050
Source
Food Nutr Bull. 2014 Jun;35(2):244-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Tony Sheehy
Fariba Kolahdooz
Cindy Roache
Sangita Sharma
Source
Food Nutr Bull. 2014 Jun;35(2):244-52
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Arctic Regions
Beverages
Body mass index
Canada
Cereals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology - trends
Dietary Fats
Dietary Sucrose
Female
Food Preferences - ethnology
Fruit
Humans
Inuits
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Nunavut
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
Inuit in Arctic regions are experiencing a rapid diet and lifestyle transition. There are limited data on food consumption patterns among this unique population, raising concerns about assessing the risk for the development of diet-related chronic diseases.
To assess the current frequency of consumption of foods and beverages among Inuit in Nunavut, Arctic Canada.
A cross-sectional dietary study was conducted among randomly selected Inuit adults from three communities in Nunavut using a validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire. The participants were 175 women and 36 men with median (IQR) ages of 41.0 (32.5-48.5) and 40.1 (30.0-50.0) years, respectively. The mean and median frequencies of consumption over a 30-day period were computed for 147 individual food items and grouped as foods or beverages.
The 30 most frequently consumed foods were identified. Non-nutrient-dense foods (i.e., high-fat and high-sugar foods) were the most frequently consumed food group (median intake, 3.4 times/day), followed by grains (2.0 times/day) and traditional meats (1.7 times/day). The frequency of consumption of fruits (0.7 times/day) and vegetables (0.4 times/day) was low. The median values for the three most frequently consumed food items were sugar or honey (once/day), butter (0.71 times/day), and Coffee-mate (0.71 times/day). Apart from water, coffee, and tea, the most frequently consumed beverages were sweetened juices (0.71 times/day) and regular pop (soft drinks) (0.36 times/day). This study showed that non-nutrient-dense foods are consumed most frequently in these Inuit communities.
The results have implications for dietary quality and provide useful information on current dietary practices to guide nutritional intervention programs.
PubMed ID
25076772 View in PubMed
Less detail

Food expenditure patterns in the Canadian Arctic show cause for concern for obesity and chronic disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256764
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11:51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Mohammadreza Pakseresht
Rosalyn Lang
Stacey Rittmueller
Cindy Roache
Tony Sheehy
Malek Batal
Andre Corriveau
Sangita Sharma
Author Affiliation
Aboriginal and Global Health Research Group, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, 5-10 University Terrace, Edmonton, AB T6G 2 T4, Canada. gita.sharma@ualberta.ca.
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11:51
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cereals - economics
Chronic Disease
Diet - economics
Energy intake
Family Characteristics
Female
Food - economics
Food Habits
Fruit - economics
Humans
Male
Meat - economics
Middle Aged
Northwest Territories
Nunavut
Nutritional Status
Obesity - economics
Vegetables - economics
Abstract
Little is understood about the economic factors that have influenced the nutrition transition from traditional to store-bought foods that are typically high in fat and sugar amongst people living in the Canadian Arctic. This study aims to determine the pattern of household food expenditure in the Canadian Arctic.
Local food prices were collected over 12 months in six communities in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories. Dietary intake data were collected from 441 adults using a validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Money spent on six food groups was calculated along with the cost of energy and selected nutrients per person.
Participants spent approximately 10% of total food expenditure on each of the food groups of fruit/vegetables, grains and potatoes, and dairy, 17% on traditional meats (e.g. caribou, goose, char, and seal liver), and 20% on non-traditional meats (e.g. beef, pork, chicken, fish, and processed meats). Non-nutrient-dense foods (NNDF) accounted for 34% of food expenditure. Younger participants (
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Feb 23;182(3):243-820100848
Cites: Nurs Health Sci. 2007 Dec;9(4):246-5317958673
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2009 Nov-Dec;100(6):442-820209738
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:5-1721158957
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:51-821158962
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:59-6621158963
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:67-7421158964
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:75-8221158965
Cites: Prev Med. 2000 Jan;30(1):26-3410642457
Cites: Appetite. 2003 Dec;41(3):315-2214637330
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jan;79(1):6-1614684391
Cites: J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1447-5315173410
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1997 Mar;97(3):272-99060944
Cites: South Med J. 1998 Oct;91(10):933-419786288
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Jan 1-7;365(9453):36-4215639678
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Oct;82(4):721-3216210699
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2006 May-Jun;38(3):163-816731451
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Oct;106(10):1673-717000202
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Sep;65(4):331-4017131971
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2010 Mar;103(5):749-5919840421
PubMed ID
24739761 View in PubMed
Less detail

Eating habits of a population undergoing a rapid dietary transition: portion sizes of traditional and non-traditional foods and beverages consumed by Inuit adults in Nunavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113451
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Tony Sheehy
Cindy Roache
Sangita Sharma
Author Affiliation
School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Republic of Ireland.
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:70
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Beverages
Body Height
Body Weight
Cross-Sectional Studies
Energy intake
Female
Fishes
Food Habits - ethnology
Fruit
Humans
Inuits
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Nunavut - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Obesity - ethnology - prevention & control
Population Groups
Portion Size
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine the portion sizes of traditional and non-traditional foods being consumed by Inuit adults in three remote communities in Nunavut, Canada.
A cross-sectional study was carried out between June and October, 2008. Trained field workers collected dietary data using a culturally appropriate, validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire (QFFQ) developed specifically for the study population.
Caribou, muktuk (whale blubber and skin) and Arctic char (salmon family), were the most commonly consumed traditional foods; mean portion sizes for traditional foods ranged from 10 g for fermented seal fat to 424 g for fried caribou. Fried bannock and white bread were consumed by >85% of participants; mean portion sizes for these foods were 189 g and 70 g, respectively. Sugar-sweetened beverages and energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods were also widely consumed. Mean portion sizes for regular pop and sweetened juices with added sugar were 663 g and 572 g, respectively. Mean portion sizes for potato chips, pilot biscuits, cakes, chocolate and cookies were 59 g, 59 g, 106 g, 59 g, and 46 g, respectively.
The present study provides further evidence of the nutrition transition that is occurring among Inuit in the Canadian Arctic. It also highlights a number of foods and beverages that could be targeted in future nutritional intervention programs aimed at obesity and diet-related chronic disease prevention in these and other Inuit communities.
Notes
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Dec;106(12):1956-6117126624
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Feb 14;113(6):791-816461820
Cites: J Nutr. 2007 Apr;137(4):1110-417374689
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jun;15(6):1535-4317557991
Cites: Appetite. 2007 Nov;49(3):626-3417574705
Cites: Annu Rev Nutr. 2000;20:595-62610940347
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Sep 5;163(5):561-611006768
Cites: Health Rep. 2008 Mar;19(1):7-1918457208
Cites: Obes Rev. 2008 Mar;9(2):151-6418257753
Cites: World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser. 2000;894:i-xii, 1-25311234459
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Dec;67(5):408-2019186762
Cites: Circulation. 2009 Sep 15;120(11):1011-2019704096
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Apr;106(4):543-916567150
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Sep;106(9):1412-816963346
Cites: Health Educ Res. 2010 Feb;25(1):109-2019748992
Cites: JAMA. 2010 Jan 20;303(3):275-620071469
Cites: Proc Nutr Soc. 2010 Feb;69(1):70-919954563
Cites: Circulation. 2010 Feb 2;121(4):586-61320089546
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2010 Mar;103(5):749-5919840421
Cites: Circulation. 2010 Mar 23;121(11):1356-6420308626
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2010 Feb;88(2):120-3020428369
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jun;13(6):852-719912675
Cites: JAMA. 2010 Nov 10;304(18):2057-821063015
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:5-1721158957
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:18-2621158958
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:27-3421158959
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:51-821158962
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:67-7421158964
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:83-9121158966
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Oct;23 Suppl 1:120-721158971
Cites: Lancet. 2011 Feb 12;377(9765):52721315931
Cites: J Nutr. 2011 Jun;141(6):1159-6421525258
Cites: PLoS Med. 2011 Jun;8(6):e100105021738451
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Sep;70(4):384-9521884654
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2009 Aug;102(3):470-719216813
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2001 Apr;60(2):112-2211507960
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 Feb;92(2):246-911818300
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Jan;103(1):39-4012525791
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Jan 22-29;289(4):450-312533124
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Feb;103(2):231-412589331
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2004 Mar;104(3):367-7214993858
Cites: Appetite. 2004 Feb;42(1):63-915036784
Cites: Obes Res. 2004 Mar;12(3):562-815044675
Cites: J Nutr. 2004 Jun;134(6):1447-5315173410
Cites: Physiol Behav. 2004 Aug;82(1):115-2115234599
Cites: Physiol Behav. 2004 Aug;82(1):131-815234601
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2004 Oct;27(3):205-1015450632
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(5):390-515513673
Cites: Physiol Behav. 1993 Oct;54(4):633-98248339
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Feb;96(2):155-628557942
Cites: J Nutr. 1997 Nov;127(11):2179-869349845
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):46-5415776992
Cites: J Nutr. 2005 Apr;135(4):905-915795457
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Jul;82(1 Suppl):236S-241S16002828
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jan;83(1):11-716400043
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Dec;106(12):1984-90; discussion 1990-117126628
PubMed ID
23724920 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary adequacy and dietary quality of Inuit in the Canadian Arctic who smoke and the potential implications for chronic disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127728
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Jul;15(7):1268-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Stacey E Rittmueller
Cindy Roache
Sangita Sharma
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, 1-126 Li Ka Shing Centre for Health Research Innovation, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Jul;15(7):1268-75
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Supplements
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Nunavut
Nutritional Status
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Vegetables
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
To compare dietary intake and quality among adult Inuit by smoking status.
A cross-sectional study using data from a validated quantitative FFQ.
Three isolated communities in Nunavut, Canada.
Adult Inuit (n 208), aged between 19 and 79 years, from randomly selected households.
Average energy intake did not differ between male smokers (n 22) and non-smokers (n 14; 16 235 kJ and 13 503 kJ; P = 0·18), but was higher among female smokers (n 126) compared with non-smokers (n 46; 12 704 kJ and 8552 kJ; P
PubMed ID
22269176 View in PubMed
Less detail