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Dietary composition and nutrient content of the New Nordic Diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119560
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 May;16(5):777-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Charlotte Mithril
Lars Ove Dragsted
Claus Meyer
Inge Tetens
Anja Biltoft-Jensen
Arne Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. Charlotte@madkulturen.dk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 May;16(5):777-85
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cereals
Denmark
Diet - standards
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Fishes
Fruit
Guidelines as Topic
Health promotion
Humans
Micronutrients - analysis
Nutritional Status
Nuts
Poultry
Recommended dietary allowances
Swine
Vegetables
Abstract
To describe the dietary composition of the New Nordic Diet (NND) and to compare it with the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR)/Danish Food-based Dietary Guidelines (DFDG) and with the average Danish diet.
Dietary components with clear health-promoting properties included in the DFDG were included in the NND in amounts at least equivalent to those prescribed by the DFDG. The quantities of the other dietary components in the NND were based on scientific arguments for their potential health-promoting properties together with considerations of acceptability, toxicological concerns, availability and the environment. Calculations were conducted for quantifying the dietary and nutrient composition of the NND.
Denmark.
None.
The NND is characterized by a high content of fruits and vegetables (especially berries, cabbages, root vegetables and legumes), fresh herbs, potatoes, plants and mushrooms from the wild countryside, whole grains, nuts, fish and shellfish, seaweed, free-range livestock (including pigs and poultry) and game. Overall, the average daily intakes of macro- and micronutrients in the NND meet the NNR with small adjustments based on evidence of their health-promoting properties.
The NND is a prototype regional diet that takes palatability, health, food culture and the environment into consideration. Regionally appropriate healthy diets could be created on similar principles anywhere in the world.
PubMed ID
23089239 View in PubMed
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The New Nordic Diet: phosphorus content and absorption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279675
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Apr;55(3):991-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Louise Salomo
Sanne K Poulsen
Marianne Rix
Anne-Lise Kamper
Thomas M Larsen
Arne Astrup
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Apr;55(3):991-6
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Body mass index
Body Weight
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Fishes
Food Additives - administration & dosage - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Phosphorus, Dietary - administration & dosage - blood - pharmacokinetics - urine
Seafood
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Abstract
High phosphorus content in the diet may have adverse effect on cardiovascular health. We investigated whether the New Nordic Diet (NND), based mainly on local, organic and less processed food and large amounts of fruit, vegetables, wholegrain and fish, versus an Average Danish Diet (ADD) would reduce the phosphorus load due to less phosphorus-containing food additives, animal protein and more plant-based proteins.
Phosphorus and creatinine were measured in plasma and urine at baseline, week 12 and week 26 in 132 centrally obese subjects with normal renal function as part of a post hoc analysis of data acquired from a 26-week controlled trial. We used the fractional phosphorus excretion as a measurement of phosphorus absorption.
Mean baseline fractional phosphorus excretion was 20.9 ± 6.6 % in the NND group (n = 82) and 20.8 ± 5.5 % in the ADD group (n = 50) and was decreased by 2.8 ± 5.1 and 3.1 ± 5.4 %, respectively, (p = 0.6) at week 26. At week 26, the mean change in plasma phosphorus was 0.04 ± 0.12 mmol/L in the NND group and -0.03 ± 0.13 mmol/L in the ADD group (p = 0.001). Mean baseline phosphorus intake was 1950 ± 16 mg/10 MJ in the NND group and 1968 ± 22 mg/10 MJ in the ADD group and decreased less in the NND compared to the ADD (67 ± 36 mg/10 MJ and -266 ± 45 mg/day, respectively, p
PubMed ID
25953451 View in PubMed
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Sea buckthorn decreases and delays insulin response and improves glycaemic profile following a sucrose-containing berry meal: a randomised, controlled, crossover study of Danish sea buckthorn and strawberries in overweight and obese male subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299667
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2018 Dec; 57(8):2827-2837
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Maria Wichmann Mortensen
Camilla Spagner
Catalina Cuparencu
Arne Astrup
Anne Raben
Lars Ove Dragsted
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, 1958, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2018 Dec; 57(8):2827-2837
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Appetite
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body mass index
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Fragaria
Fruit
Hippophae
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Meals
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - diet therapy
Overweight - blood - diet therapy
Postprandial Period
Single-Blind Method
Sucrose - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Berries and mixed berry products exert acute effects on postprandial glycaemia and insulinemia, but very few berries have been studied, and primarily in normal weight subjects. Sea buckthorn and strawberry are compositionally widely different berries and may likely produce different responses. The effects of strawberry and sea buckthorn on postprandial glycaemia and insulinemia were examined in overweight or obese male subjects. Subjective appetite sensations and ad libitum intake were also examined.
The study was conducted as a randomised, controlled, single-blinded, three-way crossover study. Eighteen subjects were studied in three 2-h meal tests followed by a subsequent ad libitum meal. Test meals contained added sucrose and either sea buckthorn, strawberry or no berries with added fructose (control). Blood samples were collected at t?=?0, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min. Subjective appetite sensations were recorded at t?=?0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 140 min and subsequent ad libitum intake was recorded. Statistical differences in all continuous measures were evaluated based on the existence of a meal or a time-meal interaction by repeated measures linear model analyses or by differences in AUC by linear mixed models.
None of the berries affected postprandial glucose. However, sea buckthorn improved glycaemic profile (44.7%, p?
PubMed ID
29022100 View in PubMed
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New Nordic Diet versus Average Danish Diet: A Randomized Controlled Trial Revealed Healthy Long-Term Effects of the New Nordic Diet by GC-MS Blood Plasma Metabolomics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287403
Source
J Proteome Res. 2016 Jun 03;15(6):1939-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-03-2016
Author
Bekzod Khakimov
Sanne Kellebjerg Poulsen
Francesco Savorani
Evrim Acar
Gözde Gürdeniz
Thomas M Larsen
Arne Astrup
Lars O Dragsted
Søren Balling Engelsen
Source
J Proteome Res. 2016 Jun 03;15(6):1939-54
Date
Jun-03-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Denmark
Diet - methods - standards
Edible Grain
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Fruit
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Metabolome
Metabolomics - methods
Middle Aged
Obesity - diet therapy
Plasma - chemistry - metabolism
Seafood
Seasons
Sex Factors
Vegetables
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
A previous study has shown effects of the New Nordic Diet (NND) to stimulate weight loss and lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure in obese Danish women and men in a randomized, controlled dietary intervention study. This work demonstrates long-term metabolic effects of the NND as compared with an Average Danish Diet (ADD) in blood plasma and reveals associations between metabolic changes and health beneficial effects of the NND including weight loss. A total of 145 individuals completed the intervention and blood samples were taken along with clinical examinations before the intervention started (week 0) and after 12 and 26 weeks. The plasma metabolome was measured using GC-MS, and the final metabolite table contained 144 variables. Significant and novel metabolic effects of the diet, resulting weight loss, gender, and intervention study season were revealed using PLS-DA and ASCA. Several metabolites reflecting specific differences in the diets, especially intake of plant foods and seafood, and in energy metabolism related to ketone bodies and gluconeogenesis formed the predominant metabolite pattern discriminating the intervention groups. Among NND subjects, higher levels of vaccenic acid and 3-hydroxybutanoic acid were related to a higher weight loss, while higher concentrations of salicylic, lactic, and N-aspartic acids and 1,5-anhydro-d-sorbitol were related to a lower weight loss. Specific gender and seasonal differences were also observed. The study strongly indicates that healthy diets high in fish, vegetables, fruit, and whole grain facilitated weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity by increasing ketosis and gluconeogenesis in the fasting state.
PubMed ID
27146725 View in PubMed
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Associations between school meal-induced dietary changes and metabolic syndrome markers in 8-11-year-old Danish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281572
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Aug;55(5):1973-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Camilla T Damsgaard
Christian Ritz
Stine-Mathilde Dalskov
Rikard Landberg
Ken D Stark
Anja Biltoft-Jensen
Inge Tetens
Arne Astrup
Kim F Michaelsen
Lotte Lauritzen
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Aug;55(5):1973-84
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Child
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cluster analysis
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage - analysis
Docosahexaenoic Acids - blood
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Fishes
Food Services
Fruit
Healthy Diet
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meals
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood
Schools
Seafood
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides - blood
Vegetables
Waist Circumference
Abstract
We recently showed that provision of Nordic school meals rich in fish, vegetables and potatoes and with reduced intakes of fat improved blood pressure, insulin resistance assessed by the homeostatic model (HOMA-IR), and plasma triacylglycerol despite increasing waist circumference in Danish 8-11-year-olds. This study explored whether intake or biomarkers of key dietary components in the schools meals were associated with these metabolic syndrome (MetS) markers during the 6-month intervention.
Data from 7-day dietary records and measurements of whole-blood docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), blood pressure, fasting blood MetS markers, waist circumference and android/total fat mass assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months from 523 children were analyzed in linear mixed-effects models adjusted for puberty, growth and fasting.
After adjustment for multiple testing, whole-blood DHA was negatively associated with HOMA-IR (P 
PubMed ID
27084093 View in PubMed
Less detail