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Role of various carotenoids in lung cancer prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203297
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1999 Jan 20;91(2):182-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1999
Author
P. Knekt
R. Järvinen
L. Teppo
A. Aromaa
R. Seppänen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. paul.knekt@ktl.fi
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1999 Jan 20;91(2):182-4
Date
Jan-20-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticarcinogenic Agents - therapeutic use
Carotenoids - therapeutic use
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk
Vegetables
PubMed ID
9923861 View in PubMed
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Dietary flavonoids and the risk of lung cancer and other malignant neoplasms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207880
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Aug 1;146(3):223-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-1997
Author
P. Knekt
R. Järvinen
R. Seppänen
M. Hellövaara
L. Teppo
E. Pukkala
A. Aromaa
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Aug 1;146(3):223-30
Date
Aug-1-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Diet Surveys
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Fruit
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Flavonoids are effective antioxidants and, in theory, may provide protection against cancer, although direct human evidence of this is scarce. The relation between the intake of antioxidant flavonoids and subsequent risk of cancer was studied among 9,959 Finnish men and women aged 15-99 years and initially cancer free. Food consumption was estimated by the dietary history method, covering the total habitual diet during the previous year. During a follow-up in 1967-1991, 997 cancer cases and 151 lung cancer cases were diagnosed. An inverse association was observed between the intake of flavonoids and incidence of all sites of cancer combined. The sex- and age-adjusted relative risk of all sites of cancer combined between the highest and lowest quartiles of flavonoid intake was 0.80 (95% confidence interval 0.67-0.96). This association was mainly a result of lung cancer, which presented a corresponding relative risk of 0.54 (95% confidence interval 0.34-0.87). The association between flavonoid intake and lung cancer incidence was not due to the intake of antioxidant vitamins or other potential confounding factors, as adjustment for factors such as smoking and intakes of energy, vitamin E, vitamin C, and beta-carotene did not materially alter the results. The association was strongest in persons under 50 years of age and in nonsmokers with relative risks of 0.33 (95% confidence interval 0.15-0.77) and 0.13 (95% confidence interval 0.03-0.58), respectively. Of the major dietary flavonoid sources, the consumption of apples showed an inverse association with lung cancer incidence, with a relative risk of 0.42 (95% confidence interval 0.23-0.76) after adjustment for the intake of other fruits and vegetables. The results are in line with the hypothesis that flavonoid intake in some circumstances may be involved in the cancer process, resulting in lowered risks.
PubMed ID
9247006 View in PubMed
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Food consumption and the incidence of type II diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176440
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;59(3):441-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
J. Montonen
R. Järvinen
M. Heliövaara
A. Reunanen
A. Aromaa
P. Knekt
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. jukka.montonen@ktl.fi
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;59(3):441-8
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet Surveys
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Risk
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
The consumption of different foods was studied for their ability to predict type II diabetes mellitus.
The study design was a cohort study, based on the Finnish Mobile Clinic Health Examination Survey.
A total of 30 communities from different parts of Finland.
A total of 4304 men and women, 40-69 y of age and free of diabetes at baseline in 1967-1972 and followed up for incidence of diabetes medication during 23 y (383 incident cases).
Higher intakes of green vegetables, fruit and berries, oil and margarine, and poultry were found to predict a reduced risk of type II diabetes. The relative risks of developing type II diabetes between the extreme quartiles of the intakes were 0.69 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.50-0.93; P for trend (P) = 0.02) for green vegetables, 0.69 (CI = 0.51-0.92; P = 0.03) for fruit and berries, 0.71 (CI = 0.52-0.98; P = 0.01) for margarine and oil, and 0.71 (CI = 0.54-0.94; P = 0.01) for poultry.
The results suggest that prevention of type II diabetes might be aided by consumption of certain foods that are rich in nutrients with hypothesized health benefits.
PubMed ID
15674312 View in PubMed
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Dietary antioxidants and the risk of lung cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225751
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Sep 1;134(5):471-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1991
Author
P. Knekt
R. Järvinen
R. Seppänen
A. Rissanen
A. Aromaa
O P Heinonen
D. Albanes
M. Heinonen
E. Pukkala
L. Teppo
Author Affiliation
Research Institute for Social Security, Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Sep 1;134(5):471-9
Date
Sep-1-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Ascorbic Acid - pharmacology
Carotenoids - pharmacology
Cohort Studies
Dairy Products
Diet
Eating
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Meat products
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Retinoids - pharmacology
Risk
Selenium - pharmacology
Smoking
Vegetables
Vitamin E - pharmacology
Abstract
The relation between the intake of retinoids, carotenoids, vitamin E, vitamin C, and selenium and the subsequent risk of lung cancer was studied among 4,538 initially cancer-free Finnish men aged 20-69 years. During a follow-up of 20 years beginning in 1966-1972, 117 lung cancer cases were diagnosed. Inverse gradients were observed between the intake of carotenoids, vitamin E, and vitamin C and the incidence of lung cancer among nonsmokers, for whom the age-adjusted relative risks of lung cancer in the lowest tertile of intake compared with that in the highest tertile were 2.5 (p value for trend = 0.04), 3.1 (p = 0.12), and 3.1 (p less than 0.01) for the three intakes, respectively. Adjustment for various potential confounding factors did not materially alter the results, and the associations did not seem to be due to preclinical cancer. In the total cohort, there was an inverse association between intake of margarine and fruits and risk of lung cancer. The relative risk of lung cancer for the lowest compared with the highest tertile of margarine intake was 4.0 (p less than 0.001), and that for fruits was 1.8 (p = 0.01). These associations persisted after adjustment for the micronutrient intakes and were stronger among nonsmokers. The results suggest that carotenoids, vitamin E, and vitamin C may be protective against lung cancer among nonsmokers. Food sources rich in these micronutrients may also have other constituents with independent protective effects against lung cancer.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Nov 1;136(9):1167-9; author reply 1169-701462977
PubMed ID
1897503 View in PubMed
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