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551 records – page 1 of 56.

Source
Can Nurse. 2012 Sep;108(7):30-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Heidi Smith
Caroline Saunders
Author Affiliation
Health and Performance Centre, University of Guelph.
Source
Can Nurse. 2012 Sep;108(7):30-1
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diet
Fruit
Humans
Nutritional Requirements
Vegetables
PubMed ID
23094503 View in PubMed
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Source
Diabetes Self Manag. 2003 Jul-Aug;20(4):88-90, 93-4, 96
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sharon Palmer
Source
Diabetes Self Manag. 2003 Jul-Aug;20(4):88-90, 93-4, 96
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coffee
Cookery
Diet
Fruit
Humans
Shellfish
Sweden
PubMed ID
12908445 View in PubMed
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How are your berries? Perspectives of Alaska's environmental managers on trends in wild berry abundance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279661
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:28704
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jerry Hupp
Michael Brubaker
Kira Wilkinson
Jennifer Williamson
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:28704
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Food Supply
Fruit
Humans
Rural Population
Abstract
Wild berries are a valued traditional food in Alaska. Phytochemicals in wild berries may contribute to the prevention of vascular disease, cancer and cognitive decline, making berry consumption important to community health in rural areas. Little was known regarding which species of berries were important to Alaskan communities, the number of species typically picked in communities and whether recent environmental change has affected berry abundance or quality.
To identify species of wild berries that were consumed by people in different ecological regions of Alaska and to determine if perceived berry abundance was changing for some species or in some regions.
We asked tribal environmental managers throughout Alaska for their views on which among 12 types of wild berries were important to their communities and whether berry harvests over the past decade were different than in previous years. We received responses from 96 individuals in 73 communities.
Berries that were considered very important to communities differed among ecological regions of Alaska. Low-bush blueberry (Vaccinium uliginosum and V. caespitosum), cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus) and salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis) were most frequently identified as very important berries for communities in the boreal, polar and maritime ecoregions, respectively. For 7 of the 12 berries on the survey, a majority of respondents indicated that in the past decade abundance had either declined or become more variable.
Our study is an example of how environmental managers and participants in local observer networks can report on the status of wild resources in rural Alaska. Their observations suggest that there have been changes in the productivity of some wild berries in the past decade, resulting in greater uncertainty among communities regarding the security of berry harvests. Monitoring and experimental studies are needed to determine how environmental change may affect berry abundance.
Notes
Cites: Ann Neurol. 2012 Jul;72(1):135-4322535616
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72. doi: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.2118823977647
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1995 Feb 27;155(4):381-67848021
Cites: Ecohealth. 2011 Jun;8(2):199-20921915737
Cites: Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Jun;51(6):652-6417533651
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Sep;67(4):335-4819024803
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Apr;68(2):109-2219517871
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Apr 14;58(7):3884-90020025229
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Jun 25;56(12):4457-6218522397
PubMed ID
26380964 View in PubMed
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Wild, edible and poisonous plants of Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76009
Source
Fairbanks: Cooperative Extension Service, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Date
1953, 1958, 1974, 1976, 1993
Author
Heller, CA
Source
Fairbanks: Cooperative Extension Service, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Date
1953, 1958, 1974, 1976, 1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Berries
Fruits
Greens
Leaves
Roots
Stems
Wild plants
Abstract
Documents common edible and poisonous plants found in Alaska, with suggestions on storage and best eating practices.
Notes
Mutliple editions held at the UAA Consortium Library and in the ARLIS collection.
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Source
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U.S. Department of the Navy, NavMed 119
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1943
Author
Standley, PC
Author Affiliation
Field Museum of Natural History
Source
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U.S. Department of the Navy, NavMed 119
Date
1943
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Edible fruits and berries
Edible greens
Edible roots and bulbs
Abstract
This manual is to be used by military personnel separated from their units while on duty in the Arctic regions. Its purpose is to aid individuals to recognize edible food plants of the area so that in emergency they may subsist from the land. The manual illustrates and describes briefly the most important edible berries, greens, and roots of the most northern areas.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 100859.
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Carbon footprint and energy use of food waste management options for fresh fruit and vegetables from supermarkets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283955
Source
Waste Manag. 2017 Feb;60:786-799
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Mattias Eriksson
Johanna Spångberg
Source
Waste Manag. 2017 Feb;60:786-799
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbon Footprint
Food
Fruit
Greenhouse Effect
Incineration
Sweden
Vegetables
Waste Management - methods
Abstract
Food waste is a problem with economic, environmental and social implications, making it both important and complex. Previous studies have addressed food waste management options at the less prioritised end of the waste hierarchy, but information on more prioritised levels is also needed when selecting the best available waste management options. Investigating the global warming potential and primary energy use of different waste management options offers a limited perspective, but is still important for validating impacts from the waste hierarchy in a local context. This study compared the effect on greenhouse gas emissions and primary energy use of different food waste management scenarios in the city of Växjö, Sweden. A life cycle assessment was performed for four waste management scenarios (incineration, anaerobic digestion, conversion and donation), using five food products (bananas, tomatoes, apples, oranges and sweet peppers) from the fresh fruit and vegetables department in two supermarkets as examples when treated as individual waste streams. For all five waste streams, the established waste hierarchy was a useful tool for prioritising the various options, since the re-use options (conversion and donation) reduced the greenhouse gas emissions and the primary energy use to a significantly higher degree than the energy recovery options (incineration and anaerobic digestion). The substitution of other products and services had a major impact on the results in all scenarios. Re-use scenarios where food was replaced therefore had much higher potential to reduce environmental impact than the energy recovery scenarios where fossil fuel was replaced. This is due to the high level of resources needed to produce food compared with production of fossil fuels, but also to fresh fruit and vegetables having a high water content, making them inefficient as energy carriers. Waste valorisation measures should therefore focus on directing each type of food to the waste management system that can substitute the most resource-demanding products or services, even when the whole waste flow cannot be treated with the same method.
PubMed ID
28089203 View in PubMed
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Mushroom fruiting and climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95561
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Mar 11;105(10):3811-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-2008
Author
Kauserud Håvard
Stige Leif Christian
Vik Jon Olav
Okland Rune H
Høiland Klaus
Stenseth Nils Chr
Author Affiliation
Microbial Evolution Research Group and Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1066 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Mar 11;105(10):3811-4
Date
Mar-11-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - physiology
Climate
Fruiting Bodies, Fungal - physiology
Geography
Norway
Seasons
Time Factors
Abstract
Many species of fungi produce ephemeral autumnal fruiting bodies to spread and multiply. Despite their attraction for mushroom pickers and their economic importance, little is known about the phenology of fruiting bodies. Using approximately 34,500 dated herbarium records we analyzed changes in the autumnal fruiting date of mushrooms in Norway over the period 1940-2006. We show that the time of fruiting has changed considerably over this time period, with an average delay in fruiting since 1980 of 12.9 days. The changes differ strongly between species and groups of species. Early-fruiting species have experienced a stronger delay than late fruiters, resulting in a more compressed fruiting season. There is also a geographic trend of earlier fruiting in the northern and more continental parts of Norway than in more southern and oceanic parts. Incorporating monthly precipitation and temperature variables into the analyses provides indications that increasing temperatures during autumn and winter months bring about significant delay of fruiting both in the same year and in the subsequent year. The recent changes in autumnal mushroom phenology coincide with the extension of the growing season caused by global climate change and are likely to continue under the current climate change scenario.
PubMed ID
18310325 View in PubMed
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Foodborne outbreaks in Canada linked to produce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192387
Source
J Food Prot. 2001 Nov;64(11):1863-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
A M Sewell
J M Farber
Author Affiliation
Health Canada, Bureau of Microbial Hazards, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
J Food Prot. 2001 Nov;64(11):1863-77
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology
Fruit - microbiology
Humans
Vegetables - microbiology
Abstract
Examples of foodborne outbreaks traced to fresh fruits and vegetables can be found worldwide. The quantity of produce eaten per capita has been increasing steadily over the past two decades, creating a heightened potential for produce-related foodborne disease. A number of outbreaks identified during this time period were reviewed, with particular emphasis placed on incidents that have occurred in Canada. The collective information highlights the diversity of infectious agents and produce items involved, with a view to the prevention of fresh produce-related foodborne disease in the future.
PubMed ID
11726177 View in PubMed
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Source
Diabetes Self Manag. 2007 Jan-Feb;24(1):25-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Stanley Kathleen
Source
Diabetes Self Manag. 2007 Jan-Feb;24(1):25-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Chickens
Cold Climate
Cookery
Diabetic diet
Fruit
Humans
Meat
Seasons
Vegetables
PubMed ID
17283506 View in PubMed
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FLUID INTAKE PATTERNS OF 6-YEAR-OLD CHILDREN IN A NORTHERN FLUORIDATED COMMUNITY.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45247
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1964 Oct 3;91:749-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1964
Author
G H BONHAM
A S GRAY
M. LUTTRELL
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1964 Oct 3;91:749-51
Date
Oct-3-1964
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Cold Climate
Fluoridation
Fruit
Milk
Nutrition Surveys
Tooth, Deciduous
Water
PubMed ID
14215214 View in PubMed
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551 records – page 1 of 56.