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12 records – page 1 of 2.

[Children of guest workers drink so much juice that they get dyspepsia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42553
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1975 Sep 10;75(36):11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-1975
Author
A L Salling
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1975 Sep 10;75(36):11
Date
Sep-10-1975
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Nutrition
Denmark
Drinking Behavior
Fruit
Health education
Humans
Transients and Migrants
PubMed ID
1043325 View in PubMed
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[Plant fibre content in the Norwegian diet]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62501
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1976 Jun 20;96(17-18):995-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1976
Author
K. Trygg
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1976 Jun 20;96(17-18):995-6
Date
Jun-20-1976
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bread - analysis
Cereals - analysis
Diet
English Abstract
Food analysis
Fruit - analysis
Norway
Vegetables - analysis
PubMed ID
950847 View in PubMed
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High pressure liquid chromatographic determination of patulin in apple juice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75669
Source
J Assoc Off Anal Chem. 1978 Nov;61(6):1359-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1978
Author
H. Stray
Source
J Assoc Off Anal Chem. 1978 Nov;61(6):1359-62
Date
Nov-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - analysis
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Fruit - analysis
Microchemistry
Norway
Patulin - analysis
Pyrans - analysis
Abstract
Patulin was extracted from apple juice with ethyl acetate and the extract was purified by elution from a silica gel column with ethyl acetate-toluene. The eluate was concentrated, and patulin was determined by reverse phase high pressure liquid chromatography using a 25 cm Partisil-10 ODS column. The lower detection limit was 1 microgram/L and the mean recovery of patulin added to apple juice was 82.6 +/- 2.8 %. The patulin content ranged from less than 1 to 220 microgram/L for the 140 samples analyzed.
PubMed ID
730640 View in PubMed
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[Microtraumatism among melon growers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251803
Source
Zdravookhr Ross Fed. 1975 Nov;(11):16-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1975

Identification of volatile compounds in hybrids between raspberry (Rubus idaeus, L.) and arctic bramble (Rubus arciticus, L.).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13193
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1976 Nov 24;162(3):263-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-24-1976
Author
T. Pyysalo
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1976 Nov 24;162(3):263-72
Date
Nov-24-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acids - analysis
Benzyl Alcohols - analysis
Butanones - analysis
Dinitrobenzenes - analysis
Fruit - analysis
Furans
Heptanoic Acids
Hexanoic Acids
Hybridization, Genetic
Pentanols - analysis
Terpenes - analysis
Abstract
The present work is concerned with the aroma of hybrids between raspberry (Rubus idaeus, L.) and arctic bramble (Rubus arcticus, L.). Analyses of the volatiles were performed in three stages. The carbonyl compounds were determined as 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones, the volatile acids and the neutral components separately in a combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometer components separately in a combined gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer using glass capillary columns. Over 70 compounds were identified in the aroma concentrates of the hybrids. The major components included acetic and hexanoic acids, trans 3-penten-1-ol, 2-heptanol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, benzyl alcohol and linalool. 2,5-Dimethyl-4-methoxy-2,3-dihydro-3-furanone together with alpha and beta-ionones, characteristic compounds of arctic bramble and raspberry, respectively, were found in the hybrids in much lower concentrations than in the parent berries. Percentage concentrations of the main components in the volatile oils, together with their approximate concentrations in the press juices, were determined. The contents of the corresponding compounds in arctic bramble and in raspberry are also given.
PubMed ID
1007619 View in PubMed
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Residues of DDT in a Norwegian fruitgrowing district two and four years after the termination of DDT usage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247922
Source
Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 1979;8(2):201-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
N J Kveseth
J E Bjerk
N. Fimreite
J. Stenersen
Source
Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 1979;8(2):201-12
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Animals
Birds
Cattle
DDT - analysis
Fishes - metabolism
Fruit - analysis
Humans
Invertebrates - metabolism
Norway
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Soil - analysis
Abstract
This study describes the extent of DDT contamination in a typical fruit growing district in Norway two and four years after the DDT ban. Residues of DDT in man, dairy cows and soil were about five to one hundred times higher than in the control groups, while residues found in samples from the marine biota were the same or moderately higher (Figure 3). The residues of DDT in cows, gulls and parts of the marine samples showed a significant decrease from 1972 to 1974, while the level in soil was almost constant. The amount of DDE had increased considerably in 1974 for all the species except for the gull, although not to the same degree. The distribution of DDE, DDD and DDT in soil were almost constant during the two years of sampling.
PubMed ID
120139 View in PubMed
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Selenium content of food consumed by Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252443
Source
J Nutr. 1975 Mar;105(3):274-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1975
Author
J N Thompson
P. Erdody
D C Smith
Source
J Nutr. 1975 Mar;105(3):274-7
Date
Mar-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cereals - analysis
Dairy Products - analysis
Deficiency Diseases - etiology
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - analysis
Dietary Fats - analysis
Fish Products - analysis
Food analysis
Fruit - analysis
Humans
Infant
Meat - analysis
Nutritional Requirements
Poultry Products - analysis
Selenium - analysis - deficiency
Urban Population
Vegetables - analysis
Abstract
Four composite diets from three cities, each representing the daily per capita consumption of foods in Canada, contained on analysis 191, 220, 113, and 150 mug selenium. Cereals provided the most selenium (62-112 mug) followed by meat, poultry, and fish (25-90 mug) and dairy products (5-25 mug). The average daily intake of selenium in Canada was also calculated from published analytical data and the per capita disappearance of unprepared foods. The total intake was 197 mug/day, and the major sources were wheat flour (98 mug), pork (21 mug), poultry products (24 mug), and fish (17 mug). Because the average diet is rich in selenium, the possibility of a deficiency in the adult is considered to be remote. Milk is relatively low in selenium, and thus the greatest deprivation in humans would occur during infancy.
PubMed ID
1117338 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.