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212 records – page 1 of 22.

Source
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U.S. Department of the Navy, NavMed 119
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1943
Author
Standley, PC
Author Affiliation
Field Museum of Natural History
Source
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U.S. Department of the Navy, NavMed 119
Date
1943
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Edible fruits and berries
Edible greens
Edible roots and bulbs
Abstract
This manual is to be used by military personnel separated from their units while on duty in the Arctic regions. Its purpose is to aid individuals to recognize edible food plants of the area so that in emergency they may subsist from the land. The manual illustrates and describes briefly the most important edible berries, greens, and roots of the most northern areas.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 100859.
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Foodborne outbreaks in Canada linked to produce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192387
Source
J Food Prot. 2001 Nov;64(11):1863-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
A M Sewell
J M Farber
Author Affiliation
Health Canada, Bureau of Microbial Hazards, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
J Food Prot. 2001 Nov;64(11):1863-77
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology
Fruit - microbiology
Humans
Vegetables - microbiology
Abstract
Examples of foodborne outbreaks traced to fresh fruits and vegetables can be found worldwide. The quantity of produce eaten per capita has been increasing steadily over the past two decades, creating a heightened potential for produce-related foodborne disease. A number of outbreaks identified during this time period were reviewed, with particular emphasis placed on incidents that have occurred in Canada. The collective information highlights the diversity of infectious agents and produce items involved, with a view to the prevention of fresh produce-related foodborne disease in the future.
PubMed ID
11726177 View in PubMed
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Mushroom fruiting and climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95561
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Mar 11;105(10):3811-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-2008
Author
Kauserud Håvard
Stige Leif Christian
Vik Jon Olav
Okland Rune H
Høiland Klaus
Stenseth Nils Chr
Author Affiliation
Microbial Evolution Research Group and Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department of Biology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1066 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Mar 11;105(10):3811-4
Date
Mar-11-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - physiology
Climate
Fruiting Bodies, Fungal - physiology
Geography
Norway
Seasons
Time Factors
Abstract
Many species of fungi produce ephemeral autumnal fruiting bodies to spread and multiply. Despite their attraction for mushroom pickers and their economic importance, little is known about the phenology of fruiting bodies. Using approximately 34,500 dated herbarium records we analyzed changes in the autumnal fruiting date of mushrooms in Norway over the period 1940-2006. We show that the time of fruiting has changed considerably over this time period, with an average delay in fruiting since 1980 of 12.9 days. The changes differ strongly between species and groups of species. Early-fruiting species have experienced a stronger delay than late fruiters, resulting in a more compressed fruiting season. There is also a geographic trend of earlier fruiting in the northern and more continental parts of Norway than in more southern and oceanic parts. Incorporating monthly precipitation and temperature variables into the analyses provides indications that increasing temperatures during autumn and winter months bring about significant delay of fruiting both in the same year and in the subsequent year. The recent changes in autumnal mushroom phenology coincide with the extension of the growing season caused by global climate change and are likely to continue under the current climate change scenario.
PubMed ID
18310325 View in PubMed
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Chili pepper fruits: content and pattern of capsaicinoids in single fruits of different ages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91000
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Dec 24;56(24):12114-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-24-2008
Author
Mueller-Seitz Erika
Hiepler Constanze
Petz Michael
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Chemistry, University of Wuppertal, D-42097 Wuppertal, Germany.
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Dec 24;56(24):12114-21
Date
Dec-24-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Capsaicin - analogs & derivatives - analysis
Capsicum - chemistry - growth & development
Fruit - chemistry - growth & development
Abstract
The content of capsaicinoids differs widely in fruits of an individual plant. This is shown for Capsicum annuum var. Cayenne and var. DeArbol and Capsicum frutescens var. Hot Siberian, respectively. Three age groups, (i) very young, (ii) medium age, and (iii) older fruits, were studied. A consistent dependence on the node position on the plant for fruit weight and capsaicinoid content of the individual fruits was not observed. These traits do not develop concomitantly and are influenced differently by environmental factors. Therefore, the expression as capsaicinoid content per fruit leads to a different conclusion than a comparison of concentration values (mg/kg). This is exemplified for C. frutescens var. Hot Siberian grown in two consecutive years with fruits of lower fruit weight but the same capsaicinoid accumulation in the second year. Higher values for pungency (expressed as mg/kg) would have been the result from the analysis of bulked material. The fatty acid pattern of capsaicinoids is uniform for all fruits from one plant, irrespective of the large variation of total capsaicinoid content.
PubMed ID
19049315 View in PubMed
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Free school fruit--sustained effect 1 year later.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83183
Source
Health Educ Res. 2006 Apr;21(2):268-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Bere E.
Veierød M B
Bjelland M.
Klepp K-I
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, Norway. e.t.bere@medisin.uio.no
Source
Health Educ Res. 2006 Apr;21(2):268-75
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Food Habits
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Norway
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Abstract
This study reports the effect of a school-randomized fruit and vegetable intervention consisting of a subscription to the Norwegian School Fruit Programme at no parental cost, and the Fruit and Vegetables Make the Marks (FVMM) educational programme, both delivered in the school year of 2001-02. Nine randomly chosen schools received the intervention and 10 schools served as control schools. Participating pupils completed questionnaires at baseline (September 2001), at Follow-up 1 (May-June 2002) and at Follow-up 2 (May 2003). A total of 517 pupils (84%; mean age, 11.3 years at baseline) participated in all three surveys. At both Follow-up 1 and Follow-up 2, strong intervention effects were observed for all-day fruit and vegetable intake (effect sizes were 0.6 and 0.5 portions, respectively). The sustained effect at Follow-up 2, 1 year after the end of the intervention, can partly be explained by greater participation rates in the School Fruit Programme (standard paid subscription). We conclude that the effects observed are most likely due to the no-cost subscription and not due to the FVMM educational programme, and that providing pupils with a piece of fruit or a vegetable at school at no cost for the parents is an effective strategy to increase school children's intake of fruit and vegetables. The effect is also sustained 1 year after the end of the no-cost subscription, providing increased health benefits.
PubMed ID
16219630 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does school environment affect 11-year-olds' fruit and vegetable intake in Denmark?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89819
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Apr;68(8):1416-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Krølner Rikke
Due Pernille
Rasmussen Mette
Damsgaard Mogens Trab
Holstein Bjørn E
Klepp Knut-Inge
Lynch John
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. r.kolner@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Apr;68(8):1416-24
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Denmark
Diet Surveys
Female
Fruit
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Schools
Social Environment
Vegetables
Abstract
It is often found that adolescents eat too little fruit and vegetables. We examined the importance of school for 11-year-olds' daily intake measured by food frequency- and 24-h recall questionnaires in Danish data from the European 2003 Pro Children Survey. Multilevel logistic regression analyses included matched student-parent-school questionnaire data (N=1410) from a random sample of 59 schools and were conducted for fruit and vegetables separately: 1) without explanatory variables, to decompose the between-school and within-school variance; 2) with individual level covariates (socioeconomic position, parental intake, etc.) to examine if the between-school variance was attributable to different student compositions of schools; and 3) with individual- and school-level covariates (school availability of fruit/vegetables and unhealthy food) to examine the effect of context. Additional analyses stratified by gender and home availability of fruit/vegetables examined if school food availability influenced subgroups differently. Between-school variations were quantified by intra class correlations and median odds ratios. We found that 40% of the students ate > or = 200 g fruit/day and 25% ate > or = 130 g vegetables/day. Most of the total variance in students' intake occurred at the individual level (93-98%). There were larger between-school variations in vegetable intake than in fruit intake. Fruit and vegetable consumption clustered within schools to a larger degree for boys than girls. The between-school variance did not differ by home availability. Boys and students from high availability homes consumed more fruit and/or vegetables if enrolled in schools with access to fruit/vegetables and unhealthy food or contrarily with no food available versus schools with only fruit/vegetables available. The small school-level effects on 11-year-olds' fruit and vegetable intake imply that family level interventions may be more important and that the success of school interventions will rely on the degree of parental involvement.
PubMed ID
19251345 View in PubMed
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[Carbohydrate composition of vegetables and fruits used in nutrition of the Russian population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186092
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2003;72(1):23-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
I S Marchenkova
A K Baturin
M M Gapparov
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2003;72(1):23-6
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbohydrates - analysis
Food - standards
Food analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Nutrition Surveys
Russia
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
In clause the given literatures on structures of carbohydrates of vegetables, fruit, berry and nuts are resulted. The role separate carbohydrates and food fiber in ability organisms in discussion.
PubMed ID
12664695 View in PubMed
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Comparison of pesticide residues in composite samples and in individual units: the Swedish approach to sampling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197281
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2000 Jul;17(7):547-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
A. Andersson
Author Affiliation
National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden. aran@slv.se
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2000 Jul;17(7):547-50
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Food Analysis - methods
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Insecticides - analysis
Organophosphorus Compounds
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Sweden
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
The method used to take samples for residues testing in Sweden involves taking three subsamples of 1-2 kg. These are split in two for laboratory analyses. Where required one of these laboratory samples can be used to determine the variability between individual units. Details of the variation in residues in individual units of a number of commodities are presented. The highest variability factors, around 600, expressed as the quotient of the maximum and the minimum residue, were found for methamidophos in peppers and monocrotophos in grapes.
PubMed ID
10983576 View in PubMed
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Comparison of buffet and à la carte serving at worksite canteens on nutrient intake and fruit and vegetable consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78860
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Mar;10(3):292-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Lassen A.
Hansen Ks
Trolle E.
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research, Søborg, Denmark. ann@dfvf.dk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Mar;10(3):292-7
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Choice Behavior
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Food Preferences
Food Services
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the nutritional composition of worksite canteen lunches and to examine the impact of two meal serving systems on employee intake, i.e. buffet style with a fixed price for a varied number of dishes and à la carte style with a separate price for each item on the menu. DESIGN: Laboratory technicians observed employees' food selection and collected identical dishes. Food items were weighed separately to calculate the content of fruit and vegetables. The content of protein, fat and ash of each dish was chemically analysed and the carbohydrate and energy content calculated. SETTING: Fifteen randomly chosen worksite canteens in Denmark: eight canteens serving buffet style and seven canteens with an à la carte line. SUBJECTS: one hundred and eighty randomly chosen employees having lunch at the worksite canteens. RESULTS: The average percentage energy from fat was 37 +/- 12 among men and 33 +/- 12 among women. No association was found between the meal serving system and energy intake or macronutrient composition. Eating at canteens serving buffet style, on the other hand, was associated with an increased intake of fruit and vegetables, on average 76 g, and a lower energy density of the food for both genders. CONCLUSION: The results highlight the possibilities of promoting healthy food choices in the catering sector and the need to identify models of healthy catering practice. Serving buffet style appears to be a promising strategy in order to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in food served away from home.
PubMed ID
17288627 View in PubMed
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Wild berries: a good source of omega-3.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81138
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Mar;61(3):431-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Bere E.
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. e.t.bere@medisin.uio.no
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Mar;61(3):431-3
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - analysis
Food analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Norway
Nutritive Value
alpha-Linolenic Acid - analysis
Abstract
It has been reported that some wild green vegetables are good sources of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, an essential omega-3 fatty acid). Using available data from the Norwegian food composition table, the present study shows that three common Nordic berries (blueberry, cloudberry and cowberry) on average contain 0.7 g of fat (=21% of total energy) and 0.25 g ALA (=36% of total fat) per 100 g, which is quite similar to what has been reported for the ALA-rich wild green vegetables. In addition, this study shows that a hypothetical replacement of 5% of Norwegian 8th grade girls' diet, with a similar energy amount of wild berries, would significantly improve the diet - also improve intake of nutrients not commonly associated with berries.
PubMed ID
16900081 View in PubMed
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212 records – page 1 of 22.