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54 records – page 1 of 6.

Source
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U.S. Department of the Navy, NavMed 119
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1943
Author
Standley, PC
Author Affiliation
Field Museum of Natural History
Source
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U.S. Department of the Navy, NavMed 119
Date
1943
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Edible fruits and berries
Edible greens
Edible roots and bulbs
Abstract
This manual is to be used by military personnel separated from their units while on duty in the Arctic regions. Its purpose is to aid individuals to recognize edible food plants of the area so that in emergency they may subsist from the land. The manual illustrates and describes briefly the most important edible berries, greens, and roots of the most northern areas.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 100859.
Less detail

[Biological markers for the intake of fruit and vegetables].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200175
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Sep 30;119(23):3421-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1999
Author
L F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Institutt for ernaeringsforskning, Universitetet i Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Sep 30;119(23):3421-6
Date
Sep-30-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Carotenoids - blood
Diet Surveys
Eating
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Norway
Vegetables
Abstract
No available dietary assessment method is without error in measuring dietary intake. This has led to an increased interest in biological markers of dietary intake. This article is a review of the literature investigating whether the concentration of carotenoids in blood can serve as biological markers for the intake of fruit and vegetables. The literature indicates an association between intake of fruit and vegetables and the concentration of total carotenoids, alfa-carotene, beta-carotene, lutein and beta-cryptoxanthin in plasma. The same association was not observed for plasma lycopene. Results from several studies also indicate that plasma alfa-carotene and plasma total carotenoids are more suitable as biological markers of the intake of fruit and vegetables than the other carotenoids. As there are large individual variations in the plasma carotenoid response after intake, carotenoids in blood will be a better marker of intake at group level than individual level. Furthermore, the average value from several measurements of carotenoids in blood will be a better marker of long-term intake than a single measurement. Several factors in addition to fruit and vegetables influence the concentration of carotenoids in blood. It is important to assess these factors when carotenoids in blood are used as biological markers of the intake of fruit and vegetables.
PubMed ID
10553339 View in PubMed
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[Fruit and vegetables in the prevention of cancer]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10794
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Sep 20;118(22):3462-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1998
Author
R. Blomhoff
Author Affiliation
Institutt for ernaeringsforskning, Universitetet i Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Sep 20;118(22):3462-5
Date
Sep-20-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Food Habits
Fruit
Guidelines
Humans
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Norway
Nutrition Assessment
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Recent research has documented that a high intake of vegetables and fruits reduces the risk of cancer in the mouth and pharynx, larynx, oesophagus, lung, stomach, pancreas, breast and bladder. A large intake of salt increases the risk of cancer in the stomach, and a large intake of red meat increases the risk of cancer in the colon and rectum. Furthermore, the studies demonstrate that regular physical activity reduces the risk of cancer in colon, and that obesity (BMI > 30) increases the risk of cancer in the endometrium, breast and kidney. There is also evidence for increased cancer risk in the mouth and pharynx, larynx, oesophagus, liver, colon, rectum and breast from high alcohol intake. It has been calculated that a 65% increase of the intake of vegetables and fruits will reduce the incidence of cancer by about 23% or about 4,000 cases in Norway every year. It is also estimated that recommended diets, together with maintenance of physical activity and appropriate body mass, can reduce cancer incidence by 30-40%.
PubMed ID
9800497 View in PubMed
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Outbreak of cyclosporiasis--Ontario, Canada, May 1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204274
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1998 Oct 2;47(38):806-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2-1998
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1998 Oct 2;47(38):806-9
Date
Oct-2-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cluster analysis
Coccidiosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Disease Outbreaks
Eucoccidiida - isolation & purification
Fruit - parasitology
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Abstract
During May-June 1998, the Ontario Ministry of Health and local health departments in Ontario received reports of clusters of cases of cyclosporiasis associated with events held during May. This report describes the preliminary findings of the investigation of a cluster in Toronto, Ontario, and summarizes the findings from investigations of 12 other clusters. These investigations indicated that fresh raspberries imported from Guatemala were linked to the multicluster outbreak.
PubMed ID
9776168 View in PubMed
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Determination of plant polyphenols in Danish foodstuffs by HPLC-UV and LC-MS detection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61940
Source
Cancer Lett. 1997 Mar 19;114(1-2):165-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-19-1997
Author
U. Justesen
P. Knuthsen
T. Leth
Author Affiliation
National Food Agency of Denmark, Mørkhøj Bygade.
Source
Cancer Lett. 1997 Mar 19;114(1-2):165-7
Date
Mar-19-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Citrus - chemistry
Denmark
Diet
Flavonoids - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Mass Fragmentography
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
To estimate the contents of flavonoids in the Danish diet, we have used a high performance liquid chromatographic method for the analysis of fruits, vegetables and beverages. The flavonoid contents were quantified, and the observations were verified by mass spectrometry. The investigation is not completed, but we are able to give an preliminary estimate of the daily flavonoid intake at 26 mg/day. The major food contributors are tea, onions, apples, oranges, and orange juice. Other food subjects have high flavonoid contents, but the daily intake is low, so their contributions to the average daily intake are negligible.
PubMed ID
9103280 View in PubMed
Less detail

Plant sterols in vegetables and fruits commonly consumed in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72370
Source
Eur J Nutr. 1999 Apr;38(2):84-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
L. Normén
M. Johnsson
H. Andersson
Y. van Gameren
P. Dutta
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Nutr. 1999 Apr;38(2):84-9
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Chromatography, Gas
Comparative Study
Cookery
Female
Fruit - chemistry
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Hydrolysis
Phytosterols - analysis
Sweden
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
Plant sterols are known to have serum cholesterol lowering effects. A high dietary intake might therefore have a positive impact on health. All food items of vegetable origin contain some amount of plant sterols. The aim of this study was to analyse the plant sterol content of vegetables and fruits commonly consumed in Sweden, and to compare fresh and cooked samples of the same items. Altogether 20 different vegetables and 14 fruits were analysed. All vegetables and fruits were purchased in two shops in the city of Gothenburg, Sweden. Lyophilization was performed within one month of the items being purchased. The samples were frozen at -20 (C and analysed within six months, with a GLC method after acid hydrolysis, alkaline hydrolysis and silylation with tri-methylsilylether. The acid hydrolysis was done in order to detect the fraction of glycosylated plant sterols, which are split during boiling with HCl. The median plant sterol content of vegetables was 14 (3.8-50) mg/100 g edible portion. The highest concentrations were found in broccoli. Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and olives. The median plant sterol content of fruits was 16 (3-44) mg/100 g edible portion. The highest concentrations were found in oranges and passion fruits. The plant sterol concentrations were thus low in vegetables and fruits commonly consumed in Sweden. A serum cholesterol lowering effect attributed to the plant sterols in vegetables and fruits would therefore be of limited significance.
PubMed ID
10352947 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diet and nutrition in the etiology of oral cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215875
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1995 Feb;61(2):437S-445S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
D M Winn
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Oral Disease Prevention Program, National Institute of Dental Research, Bethesda, MD 20892-6401.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1995 Feb;61(2):437S-445S
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Fruit
Humans
Mouth Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Nutritional Status
Pharyngeal Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Epidemiological studies worldwide have implicated dietary and nutritional factors in the development of oral and pharyngeal cancer. Dietary information in these case-control studies generally was collected through food-frequency questionnaires. Consistently, these studies observed a protective effect of a diet high in fruit intake, reflected in a 20-80% reduction in oral cancer risk. A high intake of foods considered to be dietary staples in particular cultural groups, possibly indicating a generally impoverished diet, has been linked to excess risk. Indigenous dietary practices that in single studies were found to increase risk include a high intake of chili powder and wood stove cooking. Supplementation with various vitamins has been protective in a few studies. Chemoprevention trials generally have found that chemopreventive agents reduce the size of oral leukoplakia lesions or the frequency of second primary oral cancers. The most consistent dietary findings across multiple cultural settings are a protective effect of high fruit consumption and the carcinogenic effect of high alcohol intake.
PubMed ID
7840089 View in PubMed
Less detail

Role of various carotenoids in lung cancer prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203297
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1999 Jan 20;91(2):182-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1999
Author
P. Knekt
R. Järvinen
L. Teppo
A. Aromaa
R. Seppänen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. paul.knekt@ktl.fi
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1999 Jan 20;91(2):182-4
Date
Jan-20-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticarcinogenic Agents - therapeutic use
Carotenoids - therapeutic use
Finland - epidemiology
Fruit
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk
Vegetables
PubMed ID
9923861 View in PubMed
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Multistate outbreak of Salmonella poona infections--United States and Canada, 1991.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225865
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1991 Aug 16;40(32):549-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-16-1991
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1991 Aug 16;40(32):549-52
Date
Aug-16-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Disease Outbreaks
Fruit - poisoning
Humans
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
During June and July 1991, more than 400 laboratory-confirmed infections with Salmonella poona occurred in 23 states and in Canada. This report describes several investigations that indicated this was a large nationwide outbreak related to consumption of cantaloupes.
PubMed ID
1861671 View in PubMed
Less detail

From the Centers for Disease Control. Multistate outbreak of Salmonella poona infections--United States and Canada, 1991.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225706
Source
JAMA. 1991 Sep 4;266(9):1189-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-4-1991

54 records – page 1 of 6.