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598 records – page 1 of 60.

[Bacterium nodoantrum nova sp.--the agent of apple tuberculosis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70104
Source
Mikrobiol Zh. 1970 Jan-Feb;32(1):50-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
I H Skripal'
Source
Mikrobiol Zh. 1970 Jan-Feb;32(1):50-3
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria
Fruit
Plant Diseases
PubMed ID
5517364 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Nurse. 2012 Sep;108(7):30-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Heidi Smith
Caroline Saunders
Author Affiliation
Health and Performance Centre, University of Guelph.
Source
Can Nurse. 2012 Sep;108(7):30-1
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Diet
Fruit
Humans
Nutritional Requirements
Vegetables
PubMed ID
23094503 View in PubMed
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Source
Diabetes Self Manag. 2003 Jul-Aug;20(4):88-90, 93-4, 96
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sharon Palmer
Source
Diabetes Self Manag. 2003 Jul-Aug;20(4):88-90, 93-4, 96
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coffee
Cookery
Diet
Fruit
Humans
Shellfish
Sweden
PubMed ID
12908445 View in PubMed
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How are your berries? Perspectives of Alaska's environmental managers on trends in wild berry abundance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279661
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:28704
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jerry Hupp
Michael Brubaker
Kira Wilkinson
Jennifer Williamson
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:28704
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Food Supply
Fruit
Humans
Rural Population
Abstract
Wild berries are a valued traditional food in Alaska. Phytochemicals in wild berries may contribute to the prevention of vascular disease, cancer and cognitive decline, making berry consumption important to community health in rural areas. Little was known regarding which species of berries were important to Alaskan communities, the number of species typically picked in communities and whether recent environmental change has affected berry abundance or quality.
To identify species of wild berries that were consumed by people in different ecological regions of Alaska and to determine if perceived berry abundance was changing for some species or in some regions.
We asked tribal environmental managers throughout Alaska for their views on which among 12 types of wild berries were important to their communities and whether berry harvests over the past decade were different than in previous years. We received responses from 96 individuals in 73 communities.
Berries that were considered very important to communities differed among ecological regions of Alaska. Low-bush blueberry (Vaccinium uliginosum and V. caespitosum), cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus) and salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis) were most frequently identified as very important berries for communities in the boreal, polar and maritime ecoregions, respectively. For 7 of the 12 berries on the survey, a majority of respondents indicated that in the past decade abundance had either declined or become more variable.
Our study is an example of how environmental managers and participants in local observer networks can report on the status of wild resources in rural Alaska. Their observations suggest that there have been changes in the productivity of some wild berries in the past decade, resulting in greater uncertainty among communities regarding the security of berry harvests. Monitoring and experimental studies are needed to determine how environmental change may affect berry abundance.
Notes
Cites: Ann Neurol. 2012 Jul;72(1):135-4322535616
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72. doi: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.2118823977647
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1995 Feb 27;155(4):381-67848021
Cites: Ecohealth. 2011 Jun;8(2):199-20921915737
Cites: Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Jun;51(6):652-6417533651
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Sep;67(4):335-4819024803
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Apr;68(2):109-2219517871
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Apr 14;58(7):3884-90020025229
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Jun 25;56(12):4457-6218522397
PubMed ID
26380964 View in PubMed
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Wild, edible and poisonous plants of Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76009
Source
Fairbanks: Cooperative Extension Service, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Date
1953, 1958, 1974, 1976, 1993
Author
Heller, CA
Source
Fairbanks: Cooperative Extension Service, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Date
1953, 1958, 1974, 1976, 1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Berries
Fruits
Greens
Leaves
Roots
Stems
Wild plants
Abstract
Documents common edible and poisonous plants found in Alaska, with suggestions on storage and best eating practices.
Notes
Mutliple editions held at the UAA Consortium Library and in the ARLIS collection.
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Source
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U.S. Department of the Navy, NavMed 119
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1943
Author
Standley, PC
Author Affiliation
Field Museum of Natural History
Source
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U.S. Department of the Navy, NavMed 119
Date
1943
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Edible fruits and berries
Edible greens
Edible roots and bulbs
Abstract
This manual is to be used by military personnel separated from their units while on duty in the Arctic regions. Its purpose is to aid individuals to recognize edible food plants of the area so that in emergency they may subsist from the land. The manual illustrates and describes briefly the most important edible berries, greens, and roots of the most northern areas.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 100859.
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[Mineral composition of watermelon pulp in relation to the degree of ripeness and the region of its cultivation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62283
Source
Vopr Pitan. 1988 Sep-Oct;(5):68-9
Publication Type
Article

[Peculiarities of the nutrition of the population in various regions of the Russian Federation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62664
Source
Gig Sanit. 1967 Sep;32(9):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1967
Author
Iu R Khodosh
Source
Gig Sanit. 1967 Sep;32(9):30-3
Date
Sep-1967
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbohydrates
Cereals
Fruit
Humans
Meat
Nutrition Surveys
Oils
Russia
Siberia
Vegetables
PubMed ID
4239310 View in PubMed
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FLUID INTAKE PATTERNS OF 6-YEAR-OLD CHILDREN IN A NORTHERN FLUORIDATED COMMUNITY.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45247
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1964 Oct 3;91:749-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1964
Author
G H BONHAM
A S GRAY
M. LUTTRELL
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1964 Oct 3;91:749-51
Date
Oct-3-1964
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Cold Climate
Fluoridation
Fruit
Milk
Nutrition Surveys
Tooth, Deciduous
Water
PubMed ID
14215214 View in PubMed
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Chili pepper fruits: content and pattern of capsaicinoids in single fruits of different ages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91000
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Dec 24;56(24):12114-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-24-2008
Author
Mueller-Seitz Erika
Hiepler Constanze
Petz Michael
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Chemistry, University of Wuppertal, D-42097 Wuppertal, Germany.
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Dec 24;56(24):12114-21
Date
Dec-24-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Capsaicin - analogs & derivatives - analysis
Capsicum - chemistry - growth & development
Fruit - chemistry - growth & development
Abstract
The content of capsaicinoids differs widely in fruits of an individual plant. This is shown for Capsicum annuum var. Cayenne and var. DeArbol and Capsicum frutescens var. Hot Siberian, respectively. Three age groups, (i) very young, (ii) medium age, and (iii) older fruits, were studied. A consistent dependence on the node position on the plant for fruit weight and capsaicinoid content of the individual fruits was not observed. These traits do not develop concomitantly and are influenced differently by environmental factors. Therefore, the expression as capsaicinoid content per fruit leads to a different conclusion than a comparison of concentration values (mg/kg). This is exemplified for C. frutescens var. Hot Siberian grown in two consecutive years with fruits of lower fruit weight but the same capsaicinoid accumulation in the second year. Higher values for pungency (expressed as mg/kg) would have been the result from the analysis of bulked material. The fatty acid pattern of capsaicinoids is uniform for all fruits from one plant, irrespective of the large variation of total capsaicinoid content.
PubMed ID
19049315 View in PubMed
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598 records – page 1 of 60.