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30 records – page 1 of 3.

[Anthropogenic impact on fish parasite fauna in lakes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154940
Source
Parazitologiia. 2008 Jul-Aug;42(4):300-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
E A Rumiantsev
Source
Parazitologiia. 2008 Jul-Aug;42(4):300-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Drainage, Sanitary
Ecosystem
Eutrophication
Fisheries
Fishes - parasitology
Fresh Water - parasitology
Humans
Parasite Egg Count
Population Density
Russia
Time Factors
Water Pollution, Chemical
Abstract
Anthropogenic influence on the fish parasite fauna in lakes is studied. Three types of the influence are considered, namely pollution by industrial effluent, anthropogenic eutrophication, and development of aquaculture. Their effects on the fish parasite fauna were found to be different.
PubMed ID
18825921 View in PubMed
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[ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL RISK FOR CONTAMINATION OF SURFACE WATER RESERVOIRS BY PATHOGENS OF HUMAN PARASITIC DISEASES].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265357
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2015 Apr-Jun;(2):3-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
E P Khromenkova
L L Dimidova
O S Dumbadze
G T Aidinov
G L Shendo
A Kh Agirov
Kh Kh Batchaev
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2015 Apr-Jun;(2):3-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Fresh Water - parasitology
Humans
Parasitic Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Russia - epidemiology
Sewage - parasitology
Waste Disposal, Fluid
Water Purification
Abstract
Sanitary and parasitological studies of the waste effluents and surface reservoir waters were conducted in the south of Russia. The efficiency of purification of waste effluents from the pathogens of parasitic diseases was investigated in the region's sewage-purification facilities. The water of the surface water reservoirs was found to contain helminthic eggs and larvae and intestinal protozoan cysts because of the poor purification and disinfection of service fecal sewage waters. The poor purification and disinvasion of waste effluents in the region determine the potential risk of contamination of the surface water reservoirs and infection of the population with the pathogens of human parasitic diseases.
PubMed ID
26152029 View in PubMed
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[Contamination of protozoa by enteroviruses in fresh water and sewages].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146156
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2009 Sep-Oct;(5):28-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Skachkov
A Sh Al'misheva
A O Plotnikov
N V Nemtseva
V O Skvortsov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2009 Sep-Oct;(5):28-32
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Reservoirs - virology
Enterovirus - genetics - isolation & purification
Enterovirus Infections - epidemiology - virology
Eukaryota - virology
Fresh Water - parasitology
Humans
RNA, Viral - genetics
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Russia - epidemiology
Sewage - parasitology
Abstract
To determine rate of infection of protozoa by enteroviruses to assess the potential role of protozoa as a natural reservoir of enteroviruses.
The samples were collected from flowing and stagnant water reservoirs in Orenburg region in summer and autumn. The samples of sewages were taken in all stages of their treatment. Cultures of protozoa were isolated with micromanipulator equipped with micropipette, incubated on Pratt's medium at 25 degrees C and fed with Pseudomonas fluorescens culture. RNA of enteroviruses was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).
Seventy-two protozoan species were found in Ural river, whereas 15 and 38 species were found in lakes and sewages respectively. Enteroviruses were detected by RT-PCR in 61.8% cultures of protozoa belonging to 23 species of flagellates, amoebae and ciliates isolated from natural water bodies undergoing anthropogenic impact as well as from sewages in all stages of their treatment. Predominant localization of enteroviruses in dominant taxons of protozoa (Paraphysomonas sp., Spumella sp., Petalomonas poosilla, Amoeba sp.) was noted.
Obtained data confirm presence of enteroviruses in protozoa living both in flowing and stagnant recreation natural water bodies as well as in sewages and confirm the hypothesis of persistence of enteroviruses in protozoa and the reservoir role of the latter. Contingency of life cycles of viruses and protozoa allows to explain the seasonality of aseptic meningitis incidence caused by enteroviruses, which peaks in summer and autumn when protozoa massively multiply in water bodies.
PubMed ID
20063789 View in PubMed
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[Distribution of Aspidogaster conchicola (Aspidogastrea, Aspidogastridae) in the organism of Colletopterum spp. (Bivalvia, Unionidae) of different age from the Chivyrkuiski Gulf of Lake Baikal]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97533
Source
Parazitologiia. 2010 Jan-Feb;44(1):30-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Zh N Dugarov
Source
Parazitologiia. 2010 Jan-Feb;44(1):30-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Fresh Water - parasitology
Host-Parasite Interactions
Parasite Egg Count
Siberia
Time Factors
Trematoda - isolation & purification - physiology
Unionidae - parasitology - ultrastructure
Abstract
Distribution of Aspidogaster conchicola Baer, 1827 in the organisms of its hosts Colletopterum spp. from the Chivyrkuiski Gulf of Lake Baikal was investigated. The number of A. conchicola in the organism of Colletopterum spp. was found to decrease along the row pericardial cavity-mantle cavity-gills-kidney. The pericardial cavity of Colletopterum spp. is the most favorable habitat for A. conchicola with 72% of the helminthes parasitizing in it. In the pericardial cavity the largest number (61%) of A. conchicola was found in its posterior part.
PubMed ID
20349630 View in PubMed
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Distributions and biomass of benthic ciliates, foraminifera and amoeboid protists in marine, brackish, and freshwater sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263230
Source
J Eukaryot Microbiol. 2014 Sep-Oct;61(5):493-508
Publication Type
Article
Author
Yan-Li Lei
Karen Stumm
Stephen A Wickham
Ulrike-G Berninger
Source
J Eukaryot Microbiol. 2014 Sep-Oct;61(5):493-508
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amoeba - classification - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Ciliophora - classification - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Foraminifera - classification - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Fresh Water - parasitology
Geologic Sediments - parasitology
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Abstract
The quantitative importance of ciliates, foraminifers, and amoebae was investigated in marine, brackish, and freshwater sediments from 15 littoral stations. Total protozoan communities were usually dominated by ciliates in term of abundance, while amoebae often dominated in terms of biomass. Applying the biomass-metabolic rate equation, ciliates, amoebae, and foraminifera were estimated to contribute 66% of the total abundance and 33% of the biomass, but up to 55% of the combined metabolic rate to the micro- and meiobenthos in the 15 sediments. Statistical analyses using ciliate data demonstrated: (1) species composition and community structures represented significant differences between freshwater and marine/brackish sediments, and subsequently between temperate and arctic sampling sites; (2) the occurrence of dominant ciliates and their allocation to feeding types indicated that herbivory was the most common feeding strategy in these sediments; (3) multivariate analyses showed all of the tested environmental factors (temperature, salinity, silt/clay, carbon, nitrogen, and chlorophyll a) to be important to varying degrees, but especially the combination of salinity, temperature, and silt/clay. Multiple factor effects or comprehensive influences might be important in regulating the distribution of protozoa in sediments. The importance of protozoa in sediment systems and the potential ecological significance of cysts are discussed.
PubMed ID
24919761 View in PubMed
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[Ecological bases of the combination of natural foci of Trematoda infections in the floodplain-river ecosystem of the Konda River. Communication 2. Host population-combined foci of Trematoda infections]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78061
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2007 Jan-Mar;(1):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ushakov A V
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2007 Jan-Mar;(1):3-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Arvicolinae - parasitology
Bird Diseases - prevention & control
Birds - parasitology
Cyprinidae - parasitology
Ecosystem
Fish Diseases - prevention & control
Fresh Water - parasitology
Helminthiasis, Animal - prevention & control
Host-Parasite Relations
Mollusca - parasitology
Opisthorchiasis - prevention & control - veterinary
Opisthorchis - isolation & purification - physiology
Population Density
Siberia
Species Specificity
Trematoda - isolation & purification - physiology
Trematode Infections - prevention & control - veterinary
Abstract
In the context of the present-day teaching of parasitocenoses and the proposition that the pathogen's population is the only compulsory and specific component of a natural focus, the author discloses the ecological bases of the combination of natural foci of opisthorchiasis and methorchiasis (M. bilis), methorchiasis (M. bilis) and methorchiasis (M. xanthosomus). These foci are host population-combined. While analyzing the combination of foci, it is expedient to consider them in pairs since this provides a way of identifying only the combination bases that are unique to these foci. The parasitic systems of flukes, the parasitocenoses of co-acting parasitic systems of "twin types", the structure of foci, the species-specific composition of ecosystems, and the ecological relations of the Opisthorchis fluke hosts act as the biotic bases of a combination of foci of Trematoda infections. By coinciding, the multihost hemipopulations of parasites and the susceptibility of host populations predetermine the combination of Opisthorchis fluke foci. The susceptibility of hosts, the multihost pattern of Opisthorchis flukes, the identity of parasitic systems, and the common mechanism of pathogen transmission act as the epizootic bases of a combination of invasion foci. The morphological structure and hydrological regime of a landscape act as the abiotic bases of a combination of foci. The hydrological regime is by its nature a universal mechanism of pathogen transmission. The foci of Opisthorchis flukes at the level of parasitocenosis of metacercarium populations and fish populations in the Konda River ecosystem are combined in the age groups of only carp (Cyprinidae) underyearlings and yearlings. The abiotic, biotic, and epizootic bases of a combination of natural foci of Opisthorchis flukes are, in the aggregate, the ecological bases of a combination of foci.
PubMed ID
17436720 View in PubMed
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Ecological factors in schistosome transmission, and an environmentally benign method for controlling snails in a recreational lake with a record of schistosome dermatitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199115
Source
Parasitol Int. 2000 Mar;49(1):9-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
B J Leighton
S. Zervos
J M Webster
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Vancouver, BC, Canada. leighton@sfu.ca
Source
Parasitol Int. 2000 Mar;49(1):9-17
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Birds - parasitology
British Columbia
Dermatitis - parasitology - prevention & control
Ecosystem
Feces - parasitology
Fresh Water - parasitology
Host-Parasite Interactions
Humans
Parasite Egg Count
Pest Control - methods
Schistosoma - growth & development
Schistosomiasis - parasitology - prevention & control - transmission
Snails - parasitology
Swimming
Abstract
The avian schistosomes, Trichobilharzia stagnicolae, T. physellae and Gigantobilharzia sp., that cause Schistosome Dermatitis (Swimmers' Itch) in humans were studied in the laboratory and at Cultus Lake, British Columbia, Canada in relation to the biology and behavior of their intermediate snail hosts, Stagnicola catascopium, Physa sp. and Gyraulus parvus, respectively, and their definite bird hosts. Wind-driven, surface currents were measured. Populations of snails, close to host-bird roosting logs had a very high prevalence of schistosome infections. An experiment that mechanically disturbed the epilithic habitat of the snails using a boat-mounted rototiller or a tractor and rake, eliminated almost all of the snails if the disturbance was done in areas of high snail concentration in shallow areas of the lake during the breeding and early development phase of the snail. It is proposed that the incorporation of snail habitat disturbance into management programs is an effective way to control Schistosome Dermatitis.
PubMed ID
10729712 View in PubMed
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[Epidemiological importance of soil and water reservoirs in the natural foci of cryptosporidiosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183708
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2003 Jul-Aug;(4):100-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu A Dubrovskii
L P Emel'ianova
Author Affiliation
Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2003 Jul-Aug;(4):100-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - transmission
Cryptosporidium - growth & development - isolation & purification
Ecosystem
Fresh Water - parasitology
Humans
Mice
Oocysts - isolation & purification
Rodentia - parasitology
Russia - epidemiology
Soil - parasitology
Abstract
The main penetration route of cryptosporidia oocysts (at the infective stage) from animal carriers in the natural ecosystems of the forest zone into the environment of human habitat has been newly established. Oocysts excreted with feces are concentrated in the surface layer of the soil, then washed into water reservoirs. The viability of oocyts from the soil and the silt of river sand banks and shallows has been experimentally shown. As a result, the natural foci of cryptosporidiosis have been found to play an important role in the supply of infective agents to rivers serving as sources of water supply. From epidemiological viewpoint natural ecosystems are comparable with cattle-breeding farms and pastures. Humans run a real risk of being infected during visits to a forest.
PubMed ID
12966891 View in PubMed
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[Features of pathogenesis of Diplostomum infection in riverine Abbottina rivularis (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae) from Primor'e]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50699
Source
Parazitologiia. 2003 Mar-Apr;37(2):118-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
M B Shed'ko
Source
Parazitologiia. 2003 Mar-Apr;37(2):118-26
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Animals
Cyprinidae - parasitology
English Abstract
Fish Diseases - parasitology
Fresh Water - parasitology
Host-Parasite Relations
Lens, Crystalline - parasitology
Siberia
Trematoda - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Trematode Infections - pathology
Abstract
Autopsies of Abbottina rivularis from southern Primorye (drainage-basin of Artyomovka River, Razdolnaya River and Khanka Lake) and southern Sakhalin Island (Maloye Chibisanskoye Lake) revealed high indices of diplostomum-infected lenses of these fishes. The metacercariae have been identified as Diplostomum parviventosum Dubois, 1932, D. huromense (La Rue, 1927), D. helveticum (Dubois, 1929), D. mergi Dubois, 1932, Diplostomum sp. The most lenses of parasitized eyes possessed dorsally situated sperical protrusions of the lens capsule ("cyst"). Earlier, this phenomenon was found by Larson (1965) in naturally infected bullheads (Ictalurus). The metacercarial infection level and its dynamics, age-composition of metacercariae in both lenses and "cysts", and "cysts" production are discussed.
PubMed ID
12815813 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.