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172 records – page 1 of 18.

Studies in experimental frostbite; the response of the sympathetically denervated extremity to freezing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293931
Source
Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine. 1949 May;21(5):401-14.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1949
Author
Lempke RE
Shumacker HB Jr
Source
Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine. 1949 May;21(5):401-14.
Date
1949
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Freezing
Frostbite
Humans
PubMed ID
18137062 View in PubMed
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Frostbite: General and specific treatment: The Alaskan method

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102049
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1993 Jan-Mar;35(1):insert
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-Mar-1993
Author
O'Malley, J
Mills, W
Kappes, B
Sullivan, S
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1993 Jan-Mar;35(1):insert
Date
Jan-Mar-1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Freezing injury
Frostbite
Hypothermia
Patient
Abstract
This section is a clinically oriented synopsis of the Alaskan frostbite treatment methods and is intended for use as a pull-out for easy reference. On the first page is a summary of the rationale for treatment. The inside fold-out is a treatment algorithm. The back page consists of the inpatient treatment plan for the thermal nurse and an example of standard frostbite orders.
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Bone banking in Denmark, results of a nationwide survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7941
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1994 Nov;41(5):574-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
C A Hansen
S. Mejdahl
I. Reimann
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Herlev Hospital.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1994 Nov;41(5):574-6
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Banks
Denmark
Freeze Drying
Humans
Questionnaires
Abstract
In a nationwide survey, all orthopaedic clinics were surveyed via a questionnaire about the use of bone allografts and how they managed their bone banks. Thirty-two clinics (100 per cent) responded to the questionnaire (mid 1991). Seventeen clinics had established bone banks on the basis of femoral heads obtained from donors during primary hip replacement. Only five used bone substitutes. The mean consumption was 30 capita per year (10-132) and ten clinics estimated an increasing demand for allografts. The storage method was by freezing at temperatures varying from minus 20 to minus 80 degrees Celsius. Contraindications to procurement comprised history of infection and malignancy, all clinics tested donors for HIV antibodies and all but one for hepatitis B. Testing for hepatitis C was about to be introduced. All but one clinic developed cultures from the procured bone. Informed consent was employed by nearly all clinics, but very few obtained written consent. Since this survey, revised recommendations have been directed from the Danish National Board of Health, these listing that an HIV-test should be performed with a 90-day interval, and that testing should also be done for hepatitis B and C. International experience and this survey show that the establishment of more specific and general national recommendations would be preferable to present practice.
PubMed ID
7859522 View in PubMed
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Behavior of organic contaminants in permafrost-affected soils.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297120
Source
University of Hamburg, Department of Geosciences, Faculty of Mathematics, Computer Science and Natural Sciences. 194 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2015
-affected soils ..........................................................................................................7 2.2 Freezing process..................................................................................................................... 12 2.2.1 Freezing process in natural soils
  1 document  
Author
Zschocke, Anne.
Source
University of Hamburg, Department of Geosciences, Faculty of Mathematics, Computer Science and Natural Sciences. 194 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
7407547
Keywords
Permafrost
Contaminants
Soils
Freezing
Oil exploration
Arctic
Abstract
From Introduction: Organic contaminants entering soils pose a threat to soil functions and properties (Valentín et al., 2013; White & Claxton, 2004; Yaron et al., 2012). In freezing soils, especially permafrost-affected soils, the freezing process leads to changes in soil’s physical and chemical properties (Yershov, 1998). Soils represent a complex heterogeneous, multi-phase system, with a large interfacial area, which causes phenomena such as adsorption of water and chemicals, ion exchange and capillarity (Hillel, 2003). Therefore the interaction of freezing soils and organic contaminants is characterized by high complexity and a variety of processes, whose effects may accumulate or abate each other.
Documents
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Summary of treatment of the cold injured patient: Frostbite

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102046
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1993 Jan-Mar;35(1):61-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-Mar 1993
Author
Mills, WJ
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1993 Jan-Mar;35(1):61-66
Date
Jan-Mar 1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blebs
Extremity
Freezing injury
Frostbite
Hypothermia
Rewarming
Thawing
Abstract
Frostbite is true tissue freezing and occurs when there is sufficent heat loss in the local area to allow ice crystals to form in the extracellular spaces, and extract cellular water.
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[Use of glycerin for preventing damage to rat liver mitochondria during deep freezing]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13347
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1974 Mar-Apr;46(2):185-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
V V Lemeshko
A M Bilous
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1974 Mar-Apr;46(2):185-7
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Freezing
Glycerol
Methods
Mitochondria, Liver
Rats
Tissue Preservation
PubMed ID
4828107 View in PubMed
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Strong tolerance to freezing is a major survival strategy in insects inhabiting central Yakutia (Sakha Republic, Russia), the coldest region on earth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286180
Source
Cryobiology. 2016 Oct;73(2):221-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
N G Li
Source
Cryobiology. 2016 Oct;73(2):221-5
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization - physiology
Animals
Cold Temperature
Freezing
Insects - physiology
Russia
Abstract
Yakutia is a part of eastern Siberia, located in north-eastern Russia. The climate of this area is very harsh even by Siberian standards, and is characterized by the absolute temperature minimum, which is below?-64.4??C, and a long period of low temperatures reaching to a range between?-47 and?-55??C. Despite such a severe climate, the fauna and flora of Yakutia present a considerably rich biodiversity, suggesting a high adaptation potential of the organisms in this area. In this study, 30 local species of insects belonging to Coleoptera, Diptera and Lepidoptera were selected to investigate cold adaptation. The identification of the cold adaptation strategy was based on the measurement of the insect body supercooling point (SCP) and hemolymph ice-nucleating activity. According to the data collected, there is a high incidence of freeze tolerant species among the insects found in Yakutsk area (Yakutsk, 62? latitude, 130? longitude): 93.3% of them were freeze tolerant, and only 6.7% were freeze avoiding. It is suggested that the evolution of cold hardiness in this region preferably develops for the selection of the strong freeze tolerance that allow the insects to survive extreme cold conditions.
PubMed ID
27424094 View in PubMed
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A comparison of pooled, fresh-frozen, and lyophilized sera as a matrix for enzyme proficiency testing: the experience of the Ontario Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212337
Source
Clin Biochem. 1996 Apr;29(2):183-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
A R Henderson
S. Webb
H. Richardson
D E Wood
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Campus, London Health Sciences Center, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Clin Biochem. 1996 Apr;29(2):183-5
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Blood Chemical Analysis - methods - statistics & numerical data
Creatine Kinase - blood
Data Collection
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Freeze Drying
Freezing
Humans
Ontario
Quality Control
Reproducibility of Results
PubMed ID
8601330 View in PubMed
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Even in the high Arctic, nothing is permanent.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188750
Source
Science. 2002 Aug 30;297(5586):1493-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-2002
Author
Erica Goldman
Source
Science. 2002 Aug 30;297(5586):1493-4
Date
Aug-30-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Disasters
Freezing
Housing
Humans
Russia
Soil
PubMed ID
12202813 View in PubMed
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Improving the cold chain for vaccines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57946
Source
WHO Chron. 1977 Jan;31(1):13-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1977
Author
J S Lloyd
Source
WHO Chron. 1977 Jan;31(1):13-8
Date
Jan-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Freezing
Ghana
Preservation, Biological - instrumentation
Tropical Climate
Vaccines - supply & distribution
Abstract
The cold chain may be defined as a system for transporting and storing vaccines at very low temperataures, particularly in tropical countries. In Ghana, efforts are being made, with the assistance of the World Health Organization (WHO) to develop and test a new cold chain technology. Emphasis is on local production in order to meet the needs of the countrywide immunization program, and, if possible, of similar programs in other West African nations. Focus in this discussion is on the losses resulting from mishandling of vaccines during storage and in transit through various stages in the cold chain as well as the problems, requirements, and proposed solutions. In most countries with immunization programs, breakdowns in refrigeration during the transport and storage of vaccines in remote rural areas or at the regional and national central stores have led to great losses of vaccine. The losses are often caused by inappropriate management and technology. The most promising recent development in the area of storage is an enzyme-based time/temperature indicator contained in a paper tab which is attached to the vaccine packet. In order to reduce to a minimum the handling of vaccines at the national central store it is proposed that the ministry of health submit details of regional requirements in their requisition to the manufacturer. Then the manufacturer can make presealed packages which are dispatched by air to the national central store and from there to the regions, while they are still sealed. Insulated boxes for this purpose have been tested in Sweden and been shown to maintain deep-freezing temperatures for 5 days. Road communications to the regional centers are good in Ghana and the 5-day cold boxes give adequate safety margins. The plan for the immunization program in Ghana is to employ a combination of teams from both fixed and mobile centers. 3 contacts, 3 months apart, will be made by the fixed teams; mobile teams will make 2 contacts, 2 months apart. Mobile teams operating in the south of Ghana, where the road communications are good, will be able to perform a large number of immunizations each day, using a vehicle borne cold box. Vaccine samples, selected in the field, need to be transported under closely controlled refrigeration over considerable distances to reach the national laboratories or even European laboratories for assay. The development and testing of most of the devices described will be done at the Technology Consultancy Center, Kumasi University of Science and Technology, in Ghana.
PubMed ID
842006 View in PubMed
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172 records – page 1 of 18.