Skip header and navigation

Refine By

42 records – page 1 of 5.

Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Oct;96(10):626-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Kristín Magnúsdóttir
Jakop Kristinsson
Borkell Jóhannesson
Author Affiliation
kristmag@hi.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2010 Oct;96(10):626-8
Date
Oct-2010
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - analysis
Ethylene Glycol - analysis
Food Contamination - legislation & jurisprudence
Food Labeling
Food Preservatives - analysis
Fraud
Humans
Iceland
Methanol - analysis
Sweetening Agents - analysis
Abstract
Adulterated alcoholic beverages are legal alcoholic products that have been illicitly tampered with, for instance, by criminally diluting them with water, purposely putting them into new containers to conceal their true origin or adding toxic substances to manipulate the qualities of alcoholic beverages. The collection of cases at the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Iceland, which contains examples of each category of adulteration, is the basis of the present article. Especially noteworthy are cases involving the toxic substances methanol and/or ethylene glycol. Methanol has been added to legally produced wines to increase their "bite" and ethylene glycol to increase their sweetness. Adding these substances to wine has resulted in poisoning or death in other countries, but not in Iceland as far as is known.
PubMed ID
20959682 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antisocial personality disorder as a predictor of criminal behaviour in a longitudinal study of a cohort of abusers of several classes of drugs: relation to type of substance and type of crime.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93660
Source
Addict Behav. 2008 Jun;33(6):799-811
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Fridell Mats
Hesse Morten
Jaeger Mads Meier
Kühlhorn Eckart
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Addict Behav. 2008 Jun;33(6):799-811
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amphetamine-Related Disorders - psychology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - psychology
Crime
Criminal Psychology
Female
Fraud
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Opioid-Related Disorders - psychology
Probability
Regression Analysis
Risk Assessment - methods
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Sweden
Theft
Time
Violence
Abstract
Mixed findings have been made with regard to the long-term predictive validity of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) on criminal behaviour in samples of substance abusers. A longitudinal record-linkage study of a cohort of 1052 drug abusers admitted 1977-1995 was undertaken. Subjects were recruited from a detoxification and short-term rehabilitation unit in Lund, Sweden, and followed through criminal justice registers from their first treatment episode to death or to the year 2004. In a ML multinomial random effects regression, subjects diagnosed with antisocial personality disorders were 2.16 times more likely to be charged with theft only (p
PubMed ID
18258375 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jan;21(1):21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Paul Malik
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario. pgmalik@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jan;21(1):21
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biotechnology
Canada
Drug Industry - trends
Fraud
Humans
Internet
Ownership - legislation & jurisprudence
Risk assessment
Scientific Misconduct
PubMed ID
15685297 View in PubMed
Less detail

Consumer fraud and the elderly: a review of Canadian challenges and initiatives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168633
Source
J Gerontol Soc Work. 2006;46(3-4):137-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Carole A Cohen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Gerontol Soc Work. 2006;46(3-4):137-44
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Consumer Satisfaction
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Education
Elder Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Fraud - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Government
Humans
Marketing
Prevalence
Program Development
Social Isolation
Telecommunications
Abstract
Financial abuse is the most common type of elder abuse. Consumer fraud, a form of financial abuse perpetrated by criminals who do not know the victim, is not well studied. Seniors represent a disproportionate percentage of the victims of consumer fraud. This article reviews the data on the prevalence of consumer fraud (primarily telemarketing scams) in Canada. It examines the reasons why Canadian seniors are targets of fraud. It also describes many unique initiatives developed at the local, provincial and national level in Canada to educate seniors and those who care for them about the types of scams and the risks of fraud.
PubMed ID
16803781 View in PubMed
Less detail

Criminality among individuals testing positive for the presence of anabolic androgenic steroids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79936
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006 Nov;63(11):1274-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Klötz Fia
Garle Mats
Granath Fredrik
Thiblin Ingemar
Author Affiliation
Division of Forensic Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, and Doping Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. fia.klotz@surgsci.uu.se
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2006 Nov;63(11):1274-9
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anabolic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Androgens - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Crime - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Firearms - legislation & jurisprudence
Fraud - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Rage - drug effects
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Substance Abuse Detection - statistics & numerical data
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Violence - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
CONTEXT: Observations suggest that the use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) may trigger uncontrolled, violent rage. Other observations indicate that certain groups of criminals may use AAS with the intention of being capable of committing crime more efficiently. OBJECTIVE: To examine the proposed association between the use of AAS and criminality. DESIGN: A controlled retrospective cohort study of registered criminal activity among individuals tested for AAS use during the period of January 1, 1995, to December 31, 2001. SETTING: All individuals in Sweden who were tested for AAS use during this period. These individuals were referred for testing from both inpatient and outpatient clinics as well as from centers for treatment of substance abuse. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals testing positive for AAS (n=241), with those testing negative for AAS during the same period (n=1199) serving as the control group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The ratios (expressed as relative risk [RR]) of the incidences of several categories of crime in the 2 study groups. RESULTS: The risk of having been convicted for a weapons offense or fraud was higher among individuals testing positive for AAS than among those testing negative (RR, 2.090 and 1.511, respectively; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.589-2.749 and 1.208-1.891, respectively) whereas there were no significant differences with respect to violent crimes (RR, 1.116; 95% CI, 0.981-1.269) or crimes against property (RR, 0.942; 95% CI, 0.850-1.044). When patients referred from substance abuse centers were excluded, a lower risk for crimes against property was observed for the individuals who tested positive for AAS (RR, 0.761; 95% CI, 0.649-0.893) and the risk for fraud in the 2 groups was equalized (RR, 1.117; 95% CI, 0.764-1.635). The increased risk for a weapons offense among the individuals testing positive for AAS remained virtually unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to the impulsive violent behavior previously shown to be related to AAS use, such use might also be associated with an antisocial lifestyle involving various types of criminality. However, the existence and nature of this possible association remain unclear and call for further investigation.
PubMed ID
17088508 View in PubMed
Less detail

42 records – page 1 of 5.