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Active sensitization and contact allergy to methyl 2-octynoate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98137
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2010 Feb;62(2):97-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Maria Vølund Heisterberg
Martine Vigan
Jeanne Duus Johansen
Author Affiliation
National Allergy Research Centre, Department of Dermato-allergology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. mavohe01@geh.regionh.dk
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2010 Feb;62(2):97-101
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cosmetics - adverse effects - diagnostic use
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated - adverse effects - diagnostic use
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Immunization
Male
Middle Aged
Patch Tests
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Methyl 2-octynoate is a synthetic fragrance which was first described to have sensitizing properties in 1935. It is one of the 26 fragrances to be labelled on the ingredient list according to current European cosmetics regulation. OBJECTIVES: To report the experience with patch testing with methyl 2-octynoate 1% and 2% in pet. METHODS: 230 eczema patients were consecutively patch tested with 1% methyl 2-octynoate at department of Dermato-allergology Gentofte Hospital, Denmark and 120 eczema patients were consecutively patch tested with 2% M2O in Finn Chambers at the Départment de Dermatologie, CHU Saint Jacques, France. RESULTS: Three cases of active sensitization were observed. 2 (0.87%) of the 230 Danish subjects tested with 1% in pet. and of the 120 French subjects patch tested with 2% in pet. 1 (0.83%). There was no statistical difference in active sensitization between the two groups (P = 0.72). Allergic contact dermatitis was observed in two patients (1.67%) in the French group and none in the Danish group. CONCLUSION: Contact allergy to methyl 2-octynoate was frequently seen when patch testing with 2% in pet. However, active sensitization was also observed, when patch testing with concentrations of 1% and 2% methyl 2-octynoate. The patch test concentration should be below 1% in pet., but a safe concentration remains to be defined.
PubMed ID
20136892 View in PubMed
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Acute effects of particulate air pollution on respiratory admissions: results from APHEA 2 project. Air Pollution and Health: a European Approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15434
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2001
Author
R W Atkinson
H R Anderson
J. Sunyer
J. Ayres
M. Baccini
J M Vonk
A. Boumghar
F. Forastiere
B. Forsberg
G. Touloumi
J. Schwartz
K. Katsouyanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, St. George's Hospital Medical School, London, United Kingdom. atkinson@sghms.ac.uk
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Nov 15;164(10 Pt 1):1860-6
Date
Nov-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergencies
England - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Italy - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Particle Size
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Population Surveillance
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - etiology
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Spain - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
Weather
Abstract
The APHEA 2 project investigated short-term health effects of particles in eight European cities. In each city associations between particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM(10)) and black smoke and daily counts of emergency hospital admissions for asthma (0-14 and 15-64 yr), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and all-respiratory disease (65+ yr) controlling for environmental factors and temporal patterns were investigated. Summary PM(10) effect estimates (percentage change in mean number of daily admissions per 10 microg/m(3) increase) were asthma (0-14 yr) 1.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 2.3), asthma (15-64 yr) 1.1% (0.3, 1.8), and COPD plus asthma and all-respiratory (65+ yr) 1.0% (0.4, 1.5) and 0.9% (0.6, 1.3). The combined estimates for Black Smoke tended to be smaller and less precisely estimated than for PM(10). Variability in the sizes of the PM(10) effect estimates between cities was also investigated. In the 65+ groups PM(10) estimates were positively associated with annual mean concentrations of ozone in the cities. For asthma admissions (0-14 yr) a number of city-specific factors, including smoking prevalence, explained some of their variability. This study confirms that particle concentrations in European cities are positively associated with increased numbers of admissions for respiratory diseases and that some of the variation in PM(10) effect estimates between cities can be explained by city characteristics.
PubMed ID
11734437 View in PubMed
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Additive effects of childhood abuse and cannabis abuse on clinical expressions of bipolar disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261461
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Jun;44(8):1653-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
M. Aas
B. Etain
F. Bellivier
C. Henry
T. Lagerberg
A. Ringen
I. Agartz
S. Gard
J-P Kahn
M. Leboyer
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
Source
Psychol Med. 2014 Jun;44(8):1653-62
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Child Abuse - statistics & numerical data
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies of bipolar disorders indicate that childhood abuse and substance abuse are associated with the disorder. Whether both influence the clinical picture, or if one is mediating the association of the other, has not previously been investigated.
A total of 587 patients with bipolar disorders were recruited from Norway and France. A history of childhood abuse was obtained using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Diagnosis and clinical variables, including substance abuse, were based on structured clinical interviews (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders or French version of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies).
Cannabis abuse was significantly associated with childhood abuse, specifically emotional and sexual abuse (? 2 = 8.63, p = 0.003 and ? 2 = 7.55, p = 0.006, respectively). Cannabis abuse was significantly associated with earlier onset of the illness (z = -4.17, p
PubMed ID
24028906 View in PubMed
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The AdHOC Study of older adults' adherence to medication in 11 countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171755
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Dec;13(12):1067-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Claudia Cooper
Iain Carpenter
Cornelius Katona
Marianne Schroll
Cordula Wagner
Daniela Fialova
Gill Livingston
Author Affiliation
Camden and Islington Mental Health and Social Care Trust, Dept. of Mental Health Sciences, University College London, Archway Campus, Holborn Union Building, Highgate Hill, London N19 5NL, UK.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Dec;13(12):1067-76
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Demography
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data
England - epidemiology
Female
France - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Netherlands - epidemiology
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
Authors investigated, cross-nationally, the factors, including demographic, psychiatric (including cognitive), physical, and behavioral, determining whether older people take their prescribed medication. Older adults are prescribed more medication than any other group, and poor adherence is a common reason for non-response to medication.
Researchers interviewed 3,881 people over age 65 who receive home care services in 11 countries, administering a structured interview in participants' homes. The main outcome measure was the percentage of participants not adherent to medication.
In all, 12.5% of people (N=456) reported that they were not fully adherent to medication. Non-adherence was predicted by problem drinking (OR=3.6), not having a doctor review their medication (OR=3.3), greater cognitive impairment (OR=1.4 for every one-point increase in impairment), good physical health (OR=1.2), resisting care (OR=2.1), being unmarried (OR=2.3), and living in the Czech Republic (OR=4.7) or Germany (OR=1.4).
People who screen positive for problem drinking and who have dementia (often undiagnosed) are less likely to adhere to medication. Therefore, doctors should consider dementia and problem drinking when prescribing for older adults. Interventions to improve adherence in older adults might be more effective if targeted at these groups. It is possible that medication-review enhances adherence by improving the doctor-patient relationship or by emphasizing the need for medications.
PubMed ID
16319299 View in PubMed
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Adolescent experience predicts longevity: evidence from historical epidemiology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260065
Source
J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2014 Jun;5(3):171-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
A. Falconi
A. Gemmill
R E Dahl
R. Catalano
Source
J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2014 Jun;5(3):171-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
England - epidemiology
Female
Forecasting
France - epidemiology
Humans
Life Expectancy - trends
Longevity - physiology
Male
Sweden - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Human development reportedly includes critical and sensitive periods during which environmental stressors can affect traits that persist throughout life. Controversy remains over which of these periods provides an opportunity for such stressors to affect health and longevity. The elaboration of reproductive biology and its behavioral sequelae during adolescence suggests such a sensitive period, particularly among males. We test the hypothesis that life expectancy at age 20 among males exposed to life-threatening stressors during early adolescence will fall below that among other males. We apply time-series methods to cohort mortality data in France between 1816 and 1919, England and Wales between 1841 and 1919, and Sweden between 1861 and 1919. Our results indicate an inverse association between cohort death rates at ages 10-14 and cohort life expectancy at age 20. Our findings imply that better-informed and more strategic management of the stressors encountered by early adolescents may improve population health.
PubMed ID
24901655 View in PubMed
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Affective lability mediates the association between childhood trauma and suicide attempts, mixed episodes and co-morbid anxiety disorders in bipolar disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287299
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
M. Aas
C. Henry
F. Bellivier
M. Lajnef
S. Gard
J-P Kahn
T V Lagerberg
S R Aminoff
T. Bjella
M. Leboyer
O A Andreassen
I. Melle
B. Etain
Source
Psychol Med. 2017 Apr;47(5):902-912
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Age of Onset
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - physiopathology
Comorbidity
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Many studies have shown associations between a history of childhood trauma and more severe or complex clinical features of bipolar disorders (BD), including suicide attempts and earlier illness onset. However, the psychopathological mechanisms underlying these associations are still unknown. Here, we investigated whether affective lability mediates the relationship between childhood trauma and the severe clinical features of BD.
A total of 342 participants with BD were recruited from France and Norway. Diagnosis and clinical characteristics were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS) or the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I). Affective lability was measured using the short form of the Affective Lability Scale (ALS-SF). A history of childhood trauma was assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Mediation analyses were performed using the SPSS process macro.
Using the mediation model and covariation for the lifetime number of major mood episodes, affective lability was found to statistically mediate the relationship between childhood trauma experiences and several clinical variables, including suicide attempts, mixed episodes and anxiety disorders. No significant mediation effects were found for rapid cycling or age at onset.
Our data suggest that affective lability may represent a psychological dimension that mediates the association between childhood traumatic experiences and the risk of a more severe or complex clinical expression of BD.
PubMed ID
27894372 View in PubMed
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Age at onset of narcolepsy in two large populations of patients in France and Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192317
Source
Neurology. 2001 Dec 11;57(11):2029-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-11-2001
Author
Y. Dauvilliers
J. Montplaisir
N. Molinari
B. Carlander
B. Ondze
A. Besset
M. Billiard
Author Affiliation
Service de Neurologie B, Unité des Troubles du Sommeil, Hôpital Gui-de-Chauliac, Montpellier, France. ydauvilliers@yahoo.fr
Source
Neurology. 2001 Dec 11;57(11):2029-33
Date
Dec-11-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
France - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Narcolepsy - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
Narcolepsy usually starts around adolescence; however, there is great variability in the clinical presentation of narcolepsy.
To determine the age at onset in conjunction with severity of narcoleptic symptoms in two large populations of narcoleptic patients with a similar genetic background.
Information on age at onset and severity of the condition was obtained in 317 patients with well-defined narcolepsy-cataplexy from Montpellier (France) and in 202 from Montreal (Canada).
The mean age at onset was 23.4 years in Montpellier and 24.4 in Montreal. The age at onset was bimodal in two independent patient populations: a first peak occurring at 14.7 years, and a second peak occurring at 35. Age at onset clearly differentiates patients with a positive family history of narcolepsy (early onset) from those without a family history. Other clinical and polygraphic findings may indicate that young age at onset is associated with increased severity of the condition (higher frequency of cataplexy and decreased mean sleep latency on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test).
Bimodal distribution of age at onset of narcolepsy was found in two independent patient populations. Our data suggest that age at onset is genetically determined.
PubMed ID
11739821 View in PubMed
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AIDS survival: first drop in total deaths in U.S.; larger drop in France.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2997
Source
AIDS Treat News. 1997 Mar 7;(No 266):1, 6-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-7-1997
Author
J S James
Source
AIDS Treat News. 1997 Mar 7;(No 266):1, 6-7
Date
Mar-7-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - mortality
Female
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior
Substance Abuse, Intravenous
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
In February 1997, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported a 12 percent decline in AIDS deaths over a 1-year period, the first drop in total deaths from AIDS in the United States. The decline was greatest in the West and Northeast, followed by the Midwest and South. By ethnicity, the drop was greatest among non-Hispanic whites and American Indians/Alaskan Natives. Deaths increased in women and persons infected heterosexually, but declined for men and other risk groups, such as men who have sex with men and injection drug users. France also reported a 25 percent reduction in AIDS deaths from 1995 to 1996, as well as a 21 percent decrease in diagnosed AIDS cases from the first to second half of 1996.
PubMed ID
11364245 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol and cardiovascular mortality in US physicians: is there a modifier effect by low-density lipoprotein?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10998
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1997 Aug 11-25;157(15):1769-70
Publication Type
Article

265 records – page 1 of 27.