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Admission criteria in short-term geriatric assessment units: a Delphi study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184394
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Jul-Aug;94(4):310-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Charo Rodríguez
Marie-Jeanne Kergoat
Judith Latour
Paule Lebel
André-Pierre Contandriopoulos
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, Area of Health Services and Policy Research, 515-517, Pine Avenue, Room 10, Montreal (Quebec) H2W 1S4. charo.rodriguez@mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Jul-Aug;94(4):310-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Delphi Technique
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Hospital Units - utilization
Humans
Patient Admission - standards
Patient Selection
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
In recent years, short-term geriatric care units that operate using an interdisciplinary approach have been established in Quebec and elsewhere, in order to provide frail elderly persons with better health care. The purpose of this study is to determine criteria that target the greatest number of individuals most likely to benefit from hospitalization in this type of care unit.
A Delphi survey was conducted. The panel of experts consisted of 54 physicians and nurses working in short-term geriatric care units in Quebec. Three questionnaires were mailed and 4-level Likert scales were used. Median values, and 25th and 75th percentiles to a maximum of 2, were chosen a priori as the definition of consensus.
The survey used 14 inclusion criteria and 17 exclusion criteria. Inclusion criteria were divided into two categories and exclusion criteria were divided into four.
A typical clinical profile of a patient who should be admitted to a STGCU emerges: an elderly person presenting multiple pathologies, acute or sub-acute functional disability, and often related psychosocial problems. The instrument developed by this project is a practical guide for professionals in STGAUs as well as those responsible for allocating resources in the health care system.
PubMed ID
12873093 View in PubMed
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An urgent need to improve life conditions of seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140269
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2010 Oct;14(8):711-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
R. Hebert
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2010 Oct;14(8):711-4
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers
Consumer Participation
Disabled Persons
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatrics - education
Health Priorities
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Poverty - prevention & control
Public Policy - trends
Quebec
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
In the fall of 2007, the Government of Quebec set up a Public Consultation on Living Conditions of Seniors. Fifty sessions were held in 26 cities across all 17 regions of the province. More than 4000 seniors attended the sessions and 275 briefs were received from scientists and associations. Three themes were identified in the report published in 2008: supporting seniors and their caregivers, reinforcing the place of seniors in society, and preventing problems associated with aging (suicide, abuse, addictions). The main actions that I recommended included: Increasing the Guaranteed Income Supplement to prevent poverty; Modifying pension plans and working conditions to allow for progressive retirement; Making a major investment in home care to provide access to services regardless of place of residence; Introducing an Autonomy Support Benefit and autonomy insurance program for financing services to support people with disabilities; Generalizing an Integrated Service Delivery Network providing services to frail older people; Better training for professionals in gerontology. I also recommended setting up a National Policy on Seniors to align all government departments and agencies, municipalities and the private sector around a vision, objectives and a set of actions for improving the integration of seniors in an aging society. This would contribute to a more equitable, interdependent and wiser society. Unfortunately, the Government did not support these recommendations. It is now time for scientists to get involved in leading policy on seniors and in the political arena.
PubMed ID
20922350 View in PubMed
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Are physicians meeting the needs of family caregivers of the frail elderly?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218411
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Apr;40:679-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
S L Brotman
M J Yaffe
Author Affiliation
McGill University School of Social Work Consortium for Ethnicity and Stategic Social Planning.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Apr;40:679-85
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology
Counseling
Family - psychology
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Home Care Services - utilization
Humans
Jews
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Physician's Role
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
To explore expressed needs, both formal and informal, of family caregivers of frail elderly. To evaluate roles of physicians.
Questionnaire survey of members of the Montreal Jewish community providing care for frail elderly family members.
Jewish community of Montreal.
Volunteer caregivers who were caring for a family member or friend 60 years or older, who had greatest responsibility for providing physical or emotional support to an elderly person, who saw themselves as caregivers, and who could speak English or French were studied. Of 118 volunteers, 32 were excluded because they withdrew for personal reasons or because they did not meet study criteria.
Demographic variables, functional status of the care receiver, use of home care services, and needs assessment to identify additional services.
An average of 75.4% respondents did not use formal support services. Just under half of caregivers were dissatisfied with the attention they received from the health care system, and more than one third expressed feelings of stress, depression, guilt, and isolation.
Hypotheses for this discontent are presented. Physicians may be uninterested in helping caregivers; even if they were receptive to counseling caregivers, they could be poorly remunerated for the types of counseling sessions that are usual for caregivers; and being a professional caregiver to family caregivers is demanding in itself.
Notes
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Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 1994 Sep;40:15097920040
Erratum In: Can Fam Physician 1994 Jun;40:1093
PubMed ID
8199520 View in PubMed
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Compliance of frail elderly with health services prescribed at discharge from an acute-care geriatric ward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205369
Source
Med Care. 1998 Jun;36(6):904-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
N. Leduc
T N Tannenbaum
H. Bergman
F. Champagne
A M Clarfield
S. Kogan
Author Affiliation
Groupe de recherche interdisciplinaire en santé, Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Med Care. 1998 Jun;36(6):904-14
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Community Health Services - utilization
Continuity of Patient Care - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Frail Elderly - psychology
Health Services Accessibility
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Models, Psychological
Motivation
Patient Compliance - psychology
Patient Discharge
Quebec
Questionnaires
Social Support
Abstract
A model of compliance by frail elderly with prescribed healthcare services was developed and tested. The discrepancy between primary care, geriatric and community health center (CLSC) services prescribed at discharge after comprehensive geriatric evaluation and treatment was measured, as were those services actually used during a 6-week interval (compliance). In this model, compliance was directly related to elders' intention to adhere to prescribed services, but this relationship was modified by organizational factors, reinforcing factors, and changes in health status during the observation period. Intention to adhere resulted from individual and reinforcing factors existing before discharge.
This model was tested on 211 patients discharged to community settings from an acute-care hospital geriatrics ward. Information was obtained through interviews with the patients or care givers and from hospital, outpatient, and local community health center charts.
On average, patients used 56.9% of services prescribed; 13% of patients did not use any of the services prescribed for them, whereas 22% used all the services prescribed. Intention to adhere was influenced by patients' perception of the benefits of prescribed services and by their perception of the ease of access to transportation. Intention itself was not found to be an important determinant of overall compliance. Among organizational factors, having the ward staff make a follow-up appointment with the patients' family doctor and with the geriatric clinic before discharge and communication with the local community health center increased overall compliance. Moreover, patients who perceived they had access to transportation and to an accompanying person were more likely to comply.
The results suggest that when discharging patients to the community, steps taken for them by the discharging healthcare providers will improve compliance.
PubMed ID
9630131 View in PubMed
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[Coordination in case management practices in the context of integrated home care networks devoted to the frail elderly, a qualitative exploratory analysis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108505
Source
Can J Aging. 2013 Sep;32(3):260-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Sébastien Carrier
Author Affiliation
Département de service social, Université de Sherbrooke, QC, Canada. sebastien.carrier@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2013 Sep;32(3):260-9
Date
Sep-2013
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case Management - organization & administration
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - methods
Frail Elderly
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Abstract
The objective of this article is to understand coordination as it unfolds in case management practices in the context of integrated care networks devoted to frail elderly individuals. More specifically, we describe practical coordination processes. We conducted a qualitative exploratory study using an embedded case study design. Our study covers three health and social service centers in Québec. We noted that coordination produces convention in case management practices through a process of bringing together different types of compromise in home care situations where multidimensionality appears to be more or less important. We constructed four different types of compromise-producing convention with regard to coordination in case management practices: compromise at the interface, scheduling compromise, compromise of opportunity, and compromising change.
PubMed ID
23880440 View in PubMed
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Determinants of adult day center attendance among older adults with functional limitations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148391
Source
J Aging Health. 2009 Oct;21(7):985-1015
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Jacinthe Savard
Nicole Leduc
Paule Lebel
François Béland
Howard Bergman
Author Affiliation
SOLIDAGE Reseach Group, Université de Montréal and McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, and Occupational Therapy Program, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5, Canada. jacinthe.savard@uottawa.ca
Source
J Aging Health. 2009 Oct;21(7):985-1015
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers
Cognition Disorders
Cost of Illness
Day Care - utilization
Female
Frail Elderly
Health services needs and demand
Health Services for the Aged - utilization
Health status
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
To examine factors related to regularity of adult day center (ADC) attendance among seniors with functional limitations.
Using data collected as part of a larger study, we identified the proportion of scheduled days attended among 101 ADC users in Montréal and identified determinants of this attendance.
More regular attendance was associated with previous profession of ADC participant or spouse in a sector other than health care, receiving formal help for activities of daily living or instrumental activities of daily living on days of expected ADC participation, participating for the whole day rather than half a day, lower participation in prevention and health-promotion activities, and lower caregiver burden among persons with cognitive impairments and higher caregiver burden among persons without cognitive impairments.
To enhance ADC intervention effects, levels of participation should be maximized. Study findings suggest ways to promote more regular attendance.
PubMed ID
19773597 View in PubMed
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[Discharge planning: a process of change centered around the patient].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183750
Source
Infirm Que. 2003 Jul-Aug;10(6):22, 28-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Cécile Michaud
Jocelyne Champagne
Odette Roy
Author Affiliation
Département des sciences infirmières, Faculté de médecine, l'Université de Sherbrooke.
Source
Infirm Que. 2003 Jul-Aug;10(6):22, 28-32
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Hospitals, Convalescent
Humans
Knee Injuries - nursing
Nurse-Patient Relations
Patient Discharge
Patient transfer
Quebec
PubMed ID
12961774 View in PubMed
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[Factors facilitating or constraining volunteer involvement in community organizations for home support to seniors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257208
Source
Can J Aging. 2014 Mar;33(1):15-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Julie Castonguay
Aline Vézina
Andrée Sévigny
Author Affiliation
Université de Sherbrooke.
Source
Can J Aging. 2014 Mar;33(1):15-25
Date
Mar-2014
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Frail Elderly
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Home nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Organizations, Nonprofit - organization & administration
Patient satisfaction
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Questionnaires
Volunteers
Abstract
The reality of volunteering in nonprofit organizations who offer services to seniors at home was observed from the viewpoint of two types of actors: volunteers and coordinators. Our results suggest that there are three decisive stages in volunteering: recruitment, realization of volunteer activity, and pursuit of this commitment. For each of them, some factors are more influential than others. Their presence or absence makes possible or not the initiation of this commitment and its pursuit. In this context, a constant negotiation takes place between the actors. Each of them has to adapt himself to others. Nevertheless, this adaptation is limited. So, stability between the position of the organization and that of the volunteer is necessary.
PubMed ID
24398110 View in PubMed
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Fostering participation of general practitioners in integrated health services networks: incentives, barriers, and guidelines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152019
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2009;9:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Matthieu de Stampa
Isabelle Vedel
Howard Bergman
Jean-Luc Novella
Liette Lapointe
Author Affiliation
University of Versailles St-Quentin, Santé Vieillissement Laboratory, AP-HP, Sainte Perine Hospital, Paris, France. matthieu.destampa@spr.aphp.fr
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2009;9:48
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - manpower
Female
Frail Elderly
Health Services Research
Health Services for the Aged - manpower
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Physicians, Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
While the active participation of general practitioners (GPs) in integrated health services networks (IHSNs) plays a critical role in their success, little is known about the incentives and barriers to their actual participation.
Data were gathered through semi-structured interviews and a mail survey with GPs enrolled in SIPA (system of integrated care for older persons) at 2 sites in Montreal. A total of 61 GPs completed the questionnaire, from which 22 were randomly selected for the qualitative study, with active and non-active participation in the IHSN.
The key themes associated with GP participation were clinician characteristics, consequences perceived at the outset, the SIPA implementation process, relationships with the SIPA team and professional consequences. The incentive factors reported were collaborative practices, high rates of elderly and SIPA patients in their clienteles, concerns about SIPA, the selection of frail elderly patients, close relationships with the case manager, the perceived efficacy of SIPA, and improved professional practices. Barriers to GP participation included high expectations, GP recruitment, lack of information on SIPA, difficult relationships with SIPA geriatricians and deterioration of physician-patient relationships. Four profiles of participation were identified: 2 groups of participants active in SIPA and 2 groups of participants not active in SIPA. The active GPs were familiar with collaborative practices, had higher IHSN patient rates, expressed more concerns than expectations, reported satisfactory relationships with case managers and perceived the efficacy of SIPA. Both active and non-active GPs reported quality care in the IHSN and improved professional practice.
Throughout the implementation process, the participation of GPs in an IHSN depends on numerous professional (clinician characteristics) and organizational factors (GP recruitment, relationships with case managers). Our study provides guiding principles for establishing future integrated models of care. It suggests practical guidelines to support the active participation of GPs in these networks such as physicians with collaborative practices, recruitment of significant number of patients per physicians, the information provided and the accompaniment by geriatricians.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19292905 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.