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Are physicians meeting the needs of family caregivers of the frail elderly?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218411
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Apr;40:679-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
S L Brotman
M J Yaffe
Author Affiliation
McGill University School of Social Work Consortium for Ethnicity and Stategic Social Planning.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Apr;40:679-85
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology
Counseling
Family - psychology
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Home Care Services - utilization
Humans
Jews
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Physician's Role
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
To explore expressed needs, both formal and informal, of family caregivers of frail elderly. To evaluate roles of physicians.
Questionnaire survey of members of the Montreal Jewish community providing care for frail elderly family members.
Jewish community of Montreal.
Volunteer caregivers who were caring for a family member or friend 60 years or older, who had greatest responsibility for providing physical or emotional support to an elderly person, who saw themselves as caregivers, and who could speak English or French were studied. Of 118 volunteers, 32 were excluded because they withdrew for personal reasons or because they did not meet study criteria.
Demographic variables, functional status of the care receiver, use of home care services, and needs assessment to identify additional services.
An average of 75.4% respondents did not use formal support services. Just under half of caregivers were dissatisfied with the attention they received from the health care system, and more than one third expressed feelings of stress, depression, guilt, and isolation.
Hypotheses for this discontent are presented. Physicians may be uninterested in helping caregivers; even if they were receptive to counseling caregivers, they could be poorly remunerated for the types of counseling sessions that are usual for caregivers; and being a professional caregiver to family caregivers is demanding in itself.
Notes
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Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 1994 Sep;40:15097920040
Erratum In: Can Fam Physician 1994 Jun;40:1093
PubMed ID
8199520 View in PubMed
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Carers' and nurses' appraisals of needs of nursing home placement for frail older in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151465
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2009 Nov;18(22):3079-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Aud-Mari Sohini Fjelltun
Nils Henriksen
Astrid Norberg
Fredricka Gilje
Hans Ketil Normann
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Tromso, Tromsø, Norway. Aud.Mari.Fjelltun@fagmed.uit.no
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2009 Nov;18(22):3079-88
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Frail Elderly
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Norway
Nurses - psychology
Nursing Homes
Abstract
The aim of this paper was to explore carers' and nurses' appraisals concerning if and when nursing home placement for frail older people awaiting placement was needed and to illuminate ethical issues involved in decisions regarding nursing home placement.
Requesting nursing home placement can be a complicated decision for carers, causing feelings of failure, anxiety and guilt. After the necessity of nursing home care is determined, the names of the older people are put on waiting lists. While waiting, home health care provides support services. Even with this care, many of the older people and their carers face difficult life situations.
This is a descriptive and comparative cross-sectional study using qualitative methods.
The convenience sample (n = 36) comprised 11 carers of older people on a nursing home placement waiting list in Norway and 11 nurses caring for these older people. Every one willingly participated in interviews that were transcribed and analysed by qualitative content analysis.
Various similarities and differences between nurses' and carers' appraisals were found. Complex ethical issues of justice, equality, autonomy, beneficence and justifiability in nursing were involved in decision making concerning nursing home placement. Four categories constructed were: 'appraising nursing home to be the level of care needed', 'appraising the older people as able to continue living at home', 'being ambivalent about nursing home placement' and 'being sceptical about use of coercion regarding nursing home placement'.
Not all of the older people awaiting nursing home placements could be placed in nursing homes when beds became available. The situations were complex and involved ethical issues.
Despite insufficient resources in home health care, providing appropriate support for older people and their carers means that nurses have to consider individual concerns in each situation, cooperate with carers, respect their appraisals of needs and argue for the timely nursing home placement of older people.
PubMed ID
19374699 View in PubMed
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Delayed discharge of elderly hospital patients--a study of bed-blockers in a health care district in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73257
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Dec;21(4):272-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
K. Styrborn
M. Thorslund
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Dec;21(4):272-80
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bed Occupancy - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Female
Frail Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Geriatric Assessment
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Hospitals - utilization
Humans
Inpatients - classification - statistics & numerical data
Long-Term Care
Male
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Utilization Review
Abstract
With an ageing population an increased pressure on health care resources will be seen in most countries. Patients with delayed discharge from short-term hospitals, sometimes called "bed-blockers", are of special interest in Sweden, especially as liability for payments for these patients has been placed on the municipal authorities by a new reform in 1992. A retrospective study was made of 428 bed-blockers above the age of 64 years from one health district in Uppsala during the two-year period 1987-1988. The median age was 81.6 years, and the majority were women. The patients had a median number of diagnoses of 4.1. Additional medical events/symptoms were noted in half of the patients after they had been classified as medically ready for discharge. Even though they were classified "medically ready" for discharge, they still needed care. One-third needed further rehabilitation and another 1/3 further medical attention. Only 1/10 were independent in daily activities of living. At the final discharge 1/3 actually returned home and 16% died on the acute ward. The results clearly demonstrate that these patients often still had further medical needs after the application for transfer. One crucial question, that needs discussion, is the vague definition of a "bed-blocker". Related questions are when and where should these patients be transferred, as well as the relevance of the term "bed-blocker" from ethical perspectives.
PubMed ID
8310280 View in PubMed
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Determinants of adult day center attendance among older adults with functional limitations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148391
Source
J Aging Health. 2009 Oct;21(7):985-1015
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Jacinthe Savard
Nicole Leduc
Paule Lebel
François Béland
Howard Bergman
Author Affiliation
SOLIDAGE Reseach Group, Université de Montréal and McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, and Occupational Therapy Program, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8M5, Canada. jacinthe.savard@uottawa.ca
Source
J Aging Health. 2009 Oct;21(7):985-1015
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers
Cognition Disorders
Cost of Illness
Day Care - utilization
Female
Frail Elderly
Health services needs and demand
Health Services for the Aged - utilization
Health status
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Quebec
Questionnaires
Abstract
To examine factors related to regularity of adult day center (ADC) attendance among seniors with functional limitations.
Using data collected as part of a larger study, we identified the proportion of scheduled days attended among 101 ADC users in Montréal and identified determinants of this attendance.
More regular attendance was associated with previous profession of ADC participant or spouse in a sector other than health care, receiving formal help for activities of daily living or instrumental activities of daily living on days of expected ADC participation, participating for the whole day rather than half a day, lower participation in prevention and health-promotion activities, and lower caregiver burden among persons with cognitive impairments and higher caregiver burden among persons without cognitive impairments.
To enhance ADC intervention effects, levels of participation should be maximized. Study findings suggest ways to promote more regular attendance.
PubMed ID
19773597 View in PubMed
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Estimates of time and propensity for dental treatment among institutionalised elders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216838
Source
Gerodontology. 1994 Dec;11(2):99-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
P. Mojon
M I MacEntee
Author Affiliation
Départment de Prosthèse Dentaire, Ecole de Médecine Dentaire, Genève Switzerland.
Source
Gerodontology. 1994 Dec;11(2):99-107
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Dental Care for Aged - psychology - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Health Surveys
Dentures - statistics & numerical data
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Institutionalization
Jaw, Edentulous - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Diseases - epidemiology
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Nursing Homes
Observer Variation
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Index
Sampling Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
The oral health and concerns of elderly residents were surveyed in a stratified random selection of 41 long-term care facilities in Vancouver. The residents who could participate were examined and interviewed to determine their oral health and concerns about dental treatment. The need and time required for treatment were estimated in six groups to reflect the propensity for treatment in dentate and edentate subjects. The propensity for treatment was high in about one-third of the participants whereas it was unlikely that one-tenth of those examined would ever use a dental service. In general, there was a widespread need for a diagnostic service because so few had been examined by a dentist in the previous year. Prosthodontics accounted for most of the treatment in all of the propensity groups, with substantially more time required by the dentate residents. There was also a substantial need for management of mucosal pathoses and oral hygiene and, to a lesser extent, for dental restorations and endodontics. Overall, our estimates indicate a substantial need for dental treatment among residents of long-term care facilities, although the need is reduced by half if the propensity for treatment is considered.
PubMed ID
7750972 View in PubMed
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[Frail aging and multimorbidity affect more and more. Focus must be moved from isolated diseases to complex health problems].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138398
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Nov 3-9;107(44):2707-11
Publication Type
Article

Frailty characteristics and preventive home visits: an audit on elderly patients in Danish general practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288295
Source
Fam Pract. 2017 02;34(1):57-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
02-2017
Author
Henriette Kirstine Christensen
Troels Kristensen
Merethe Kirstine Andersen
Jesper Lykkegaard
Source
Fam Pract. 2017 02;34(1):57-62
Date
02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - complications
Denmark
Depression - complications
Female
Frail Elderly
Frailty - complications
General Practice - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
House Calls - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Preventive Health Services - utilization
Severity of Illness Index
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Preventive home visits (PHVs) to frail elderly patients, provided by the GP, have been widely promoted in many health care systems, including the Danish system. This study investigates to what extent PHVs are provided to patients with characteristics of frailty.
During a four-week period, GPs and their staff in three different parts of Denmark filled in a questionnaire for each patient aged 75 years or older who attended the clinic or received a home visit. The association between 20 different frailty characteristics and the receipt of a PHV was assessed through logistic regression.
A total of 73 GPs and 41 staff members sampled information about 3133 patients, of whom 332 patients (10.7%) had received a PHV within one year prior to their audit date. A PHV was closely associated with the patient's number of frailty characteristics. The adjusted odds ratios show that the receipt of a PHV was associated with a low walking distance 2.34 (1.65-3.31), dementia 3.35 (2.26-4.96), depression 2.24 (1.38-3.63) and a need for home care 3.40 (2.45-4.73), and increased with the GP's tendency to provide PHVs.
Most PHV-receiving elderly patients have several characteristics of frailty, the most significant being impaired mobility, dementia, depression and a need for home care. PHVs are also more often provided to patients listed with a GP who has an overall high tendency to conduct these visits.
PubMed ID
28122924 View in PubMed
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[Holistic perspective is needed in care of multiimpaired elderly. A proposal for structural change of the organization of care in the county of Stockholm]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71923
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 May 23;98(21):2596-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-2001
Author
U. Gurner
M. Thorslund
Author Affiliation
Stiftelsen Stockholms läns Aldrecentrum. ulla.gurner@aldrecentrum.a.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 May 23;98(21):2596-602
Date
May-23-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over - psychology
Community Health Nursing - organization & administration
Disabled Persons - psychology - rehabilitation
English Abstract
Female
Frail Elderly - psychology
Health services needs and demand
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Holistic Health
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Patient care team
Sweden
Abstract
Studies in the County of Stockholm reveal a malfunctioning care system for elderly persons with one or more diseases in conjunction with immobility and reduced strength. These multi-impaired elderly consume a substantial proportion of care and rehabilitation services. They would need a health co-ordinator to monitor the entire care process, dealing with all aspects of care, and whose sphere of responsibility is not unduly restricted. The communication of information from inpatient care to the primary care setting is highly problematic. Therefore it is proposed that the transfer of multi-impaired elderly individuals from inpatient care to outpatient primary care be a carefully monitored process. In addition, outside of the hospital an "elderly team" that would be composed of doctors, district nurses, rehabilitation personnel and care assistants is proposed. This team should have a geographically well-defined area of responsibility, in which they would provide care in the homes of these multi-impaired elderly.
PubMed ID
11433995 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.