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Associations between self-assessed masticatory ability and some general health factors in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52721
Source
Gerodontology. 1996 Dec;13(2):110-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
T. Osterberg
G E Carlsson
K. Tsuga
V. Sundh
B. Steen
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Göteborg University, Sweden.
Source
Gerodontology. 1996 Dec;13(2):110-7
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Frail Elderly
Health status
Humans
Male
Mastication
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were 1) to describe changes in self-assessed masticatory ability over a 14 year period (1975-89); and 2) to describe associations between self-assessed masticatory ability and age, dental state and some other background factors in a sample of the Swedish population in 1988/89. DESIGN: The Swedish National Central Bureau of Statistics investigates annually the living conditions of the Swedish population by means of interviews by trained persons. The data were analysed by means of stepwise logistic regression and calculation of adjusted relative risks. SUBJECTS: In the investigation in 1988/89, 12,901 people above 16 years of age participated and the response rate was 80%. RESULTS: In comparison between the investigations, the prevalence of reported impairment was lower in 1988/89 than in 1975 and 1980/81. Prevalence of reported impairment of chewing ability increased with ageing from 2% in young adults (16-34 years old) to 44% in older elderly (> 85 years old). In most age groups, edentulous people reported the highest prevalence, and dentate people the lowest. Relative risks for impaired masticatory ability, independent of age, gender and dental state, were higher for people in rural areas, with low income and living single, as well as for those with skeletal, gastrointestinal, psychiatric and tumour diseases. In the elderly, results from the logistic regression showed that some disability and psychosocial factors were also associated with masticatory ability. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicated that there was a group of elderly people who reported several functional and health problems including impaired masticatory ability.
PubMed ID
9452633 View in PubMed
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Changes in the Lethality of Frailty Over 30 Years: Evidence From Two Cohorts of 70-Year-Olds in Gothenburg Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285261
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Jul 01;72(7):945-950
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-01-2017
Author
Kristoffer Bäckman
Erik Joas
Hanna Falk
Arnold Mitnitski
Kenneth Rockwood
Ingmar Skoog
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Jul 01;72(7):945-950
Date
Jul-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Frail Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Geriatric Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Disparities
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
With aging, health deficits accumulate: people with few deficits for their age are fit, and those with more are frail. Despite recent reports of improved health in old age, how deficit accumulation is changing is not clear. Our objectives were to evaluate changes over 30 years in the degree of deficit accumulation and in the relationship between frailty and mortality in older adults.
We analyzed data from two population based, prospective longitudinal cohorts, assembled in 1971-1972 and 2000-2001, respectively. Residents of Gothenburg Sweden, systematically drawn from the Swedish population registry. The 1901-1902 cohort (N = 973) had a response rate of 84.8%; the 1930 cohort (N = 500) had a response rate of 65.1%. A frailty index using 36 deficits was calculated using data from physical examinations, assessments of physical activity, daily, sensory and social function, and laboratory tests. We evaluated mortality over 12.5 years in relation to the frailty index.
Mean frailty levels were the same (x¯ = 0.20, p = .37) in the 1901-1902 cohort as in the 1930 cohort. Although the frailty index was linked to the risk of death in both cohorts, the hazards ratio decreased from 1.67 per 0.1 increment in the frailty index for the first cohort to 1.32 for the second cohort (interaction term p = .005).
Although frailty was as common at age 70 as before, its lethality appears to be less. Just why this is so should be explored further.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27522060 View in PubMed
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A cross-national study of transitions in deficit counts in two birth cohorts: implications for modeling ageing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84388
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2007 Mar;42(3):241-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Mitnitski Arnold
Bao Le
Skoog Ingmar
Rockwood Kenneth
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2007 Mar;42(3):241-6
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - physiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Epidemiologic Methods
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Markov Chains
Models, Biological
Poisson Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Generally, health does not improve with age, and many physical and physiological functions are known to decline. These changes do not occur uniformly, however; for many reasons, some people experience significant improvement in their health over non-trivial time intervals. Earlier, we showed that 5-year transitions in health status in elderly people (age 65+ years) can be modeled as a stochastic process, using a modified Poisson distribution with four readily interpretable parameters. The original description was based on follow-up of a single cross-sectional study, thus mixing age and cohort effects. Here, we again used a multistate Markov chain to model 5-year deficit accumulation in relation to frailty in both a Swedish birth cohort (aged 70 years at inception) and, from the original cross-sectional study, a Canadian birth cohort, aged 69-71. In both datasets, we found again that a modified Poisson describes the transition in health status with high precision. The parameters of the model though different, are close to each other, even though the cohorts are from different countries, were assembled 20 years apart, and counted different deficits. The model suggests that all health transitions, including health improvement, worsening, and death, can be summarized in a unified stochastic model with a few interpretable parameters.
PubMed ID
17118598 View in PubMed
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Depression and use of antidepressants in Swedish nursing homes: a 12-month follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259522
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2014 Apr;26(4):669-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Patrik Midlöv
Martin Andersson
Carl Johan Ostgren
Sigvard Mölstad
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2014 Apr;26(4):669-75
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Dementia - drug therapy - epidemiology
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Frail Elderly
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Polypharmacy
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The prescription of antidepressants in nursing homes has increased markedly since the introduction of SSRIs, while at the same time depressive symptoms often go unrecognized and untreated. The aim of this study was to examine whether depression among residents in nursing homes is treated adequately.
A sample of 429 participants from 11 Swedish nursing homes was selected and was assessed with the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) and using medical records and drug prescription data. For 256 participants a follow-up assessment was performed after 12 months.
The prevalence of depression, according to medical records, was 9.1%, and the prevalence of CSDD score of =8 was 7.5%. Depression persisted in more than 50% of cases at the 12-month follow-up. Antidepressants were prescribed to 33% of the participants without a depression diagnosis or with a CSDD score of
PubMed ID
24331291 View in PubMed
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Disability transitions in an area-based system of long-term care for the elderly and disabled.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73189
Source
Health Policy. 1994 May;28(2):153-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
M. Lagergren
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Health Policy. 1994 May;28(2):153-74
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Catchment Area (Health)
Disabled Persons
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Humans
Logistic Models
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mortality
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe patterns of individual disability development and mortality in an area-based system for long-term care of the elderly and disabled. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING: Yearly surveys according to the ASIM system from 1985 to 1991 of all citizens of Solna, Sweden, receiving long-term care services from the municipality and/or the county council. STUDY DESIGN: Linkage of individual assessments concerning disability and level of care from one survey to the next, using national registration numbers. DATA COLLECTION: Registrations according to the ASIM system concerning services actually provided, assessed need of services, social environment and disability were collected by the staff responsible for the services provided. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mortality was shown to be strongly connected to disability. Disability transitions occurred in both directions for all age groups, but the average rate of disability increase rose with advancing age. Rapid disability development was shown in a multivariate analysis to be connected to institutional care and change in the level of care between surveys. CONCLUSIONS: Data describing disability development can be used for planning purposes, either directly or with the help of a simulation model. More research seems to be needed with regard to the influence of the level of care and of transfers on disability development.
PubMed ID
10171935 View in PubMed
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Environmental barriers, person-environment fit and mortality among community-dwelling very old people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265500
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:783
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Merja Rantakokko
Timo Törmäkangas
Taina Rantanen
Maria Haak
Susanne Iwarsson
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:783
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Architectural Accessibility
Environment
Female
Frail Elderly
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Male
Mobility Limitation
Mortality - trends
Proportional Hazards Models
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Environmental barriers are associated with disability-related outcomes in older people but little is known of the effect of environmental barriers on mortality. The aim of this study was to examine whether objectively measured barriers in the outdoor, entrance and indoor environments are associated with mortality among community-dwelling 80- to 89-year-old single-living people.
This longitudinal study is based on a sample of 397 people who were single-living in ordinary housing in Sweden. Participants were interviewed during 2002-2003, and 393 were followed up for mortality until May 15, 2012.Environmental barriers and functional limitations were assessed with the Housing Enabler instrument, which is intended for objective assessments of Person-Environment (P-E) fit problems in housing and the immediate outdoor environment. Mortality data were gathered from the public national register. Cox regression models were used for the analyses.
A total of 264 (67%) participants died during follow-up. Functional limitations increased mortality risk. Among the specific environmental barriers that generate the most P-E fit problems, lack of handrails in stairs at entrances was associated with the highest mortality risk (adjusted RR 1.55, 95% CI 1.14-2.10), whereas the total number of environmental barriers at entrances and outdoors was not associated with mortality. A higher number of environmental barriers indoors showed a slight protective effect against mortality even after adjustment for functional limitations (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96-1.00).
Specific environmental problems may increase mortality risk among very-old single-living people. However, the association may be confounded by individuals' health status which is difficult to fully control for. Further studies are called for.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23981906 View in PubMed
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[Epidemiology of aging with focus on physical and mental functional ability]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71897
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Feb 7;98(6):552-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-2001
Author
L. Fratiglioni
E. von Strauss
B. Winblad
Author Affiliation
Sektionen för geriatrik/epidemiologi, ARC, Karolinska institutet, och Stiftelsen Stockholms läns äldrecentrum. laura.fratiglioni@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Feb 7;98(6):552-8
Date
Feb-7-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged - physiology - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Alzheimer Disease - epidemiology
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology
Comorbidity
English Abstract
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data - trends
Geriatrics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health status
Humans
Male
Mental health
Morbidity
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
World Health
Abstract
In the past decades, the "graying" of the population has emerged as a world-wide phenomenon, leading to an increased interest in research on aging. Many population-based studies have been initiated in several countries, such as the Kungsholmen Project in Stockholm, Sweden. These studies have shown that older adults can be recruited to participate in intensive physiological and clinical evaluations, and that longitudinal surveys are well accepted by the elderly. Comorbidity and physical and mental functioning have emerged as important variables for describing health status and identifying risk factors. Dementia arose as one of the most common diseases in the very old, as dementia prevalence nearly doubles every fifth year. Some risk factors for Alzheimer's disease have been identified and interesting working hypotheses have been suggested. The natural history of the dementias have been sufficiently outlined for allocating medical and social resources, and for counseling patients and relatives.
PubMed ID
11475242 View in PubMed
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Fall and injury prevention in residential care--effects in residents with higher and lower levels of cognition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7309
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2003 May;51(5):627-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Jane Jensen
Lars Nyberg
Yngve Gustafson
Lillemor Lundin-Olsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine and Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Sweden. jane.jensen@germed.umu.se
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2003 May;51(5):627-35
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition Disorders - physiopathology
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Health Promotion - methods
Homes for the Aged - standards
Humans
Incidence
Male
Program Evaluation
Protective Devices
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of a multifactorial fall and injury prevention program in older people with higher and lower levels of cognition. DESIGN: A preplanned subgroup comparison of the effectiveness of a cluster-randomized, nonblinded, usual-care, controlled trial. SETTING: Nine residential facilities in Umeå, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: All consenting residents living in the facilities, aged 65 and older, who could be assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE; n = 378). An MMSE score of 19 was used to divide the sample into one group with lower and one with higher level of cognition. The lower MMSE group was older (mean +/- standard deviation = 83.9 +/- 5.8 vs 82.2 +/- 7.5) and more functionally impaired (Barthel Index, median (interquartile range) 11 (6-15) vs 17 (13-18)) and had a higher risk of falling (64% vs 36%) than the higher MMSE group. INTERVENTION: A multifactorial fall prevention program comprising staff education, environmental adjustment, exercise, drug review, aids, hip protectors, and postfall problem-solving conferences. MEASUREMENTS: The number of falls, time to first fall, and number of injuries were evaluated and compared by study group (intervention vs control) and by MMSE group. RESULTS: A significant intervention effect on falls appeared in the higher MMSE group but not in the lower MMSE group (adjusted incidence rates ratio of falls P =.016 and P =.121 and adjusted hazard ratio P
PubMed ID
12752837 View in PubMed
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Fall-related fracture trends among elderly in Sweden--exoring transitions among hospitalized cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113596
Source
J Safety Res. 2013 Jun;45:141-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Finn Nilson
Syed Moniruzzaman
Ragnar Andersson
Author Affiliation
Division of Risk Management, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden. finn.nilson@kau.se
Source
J Safety Res. 2013 Jun;45:141-5
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Frail Elderly
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Incidence
Male
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Fall-related injuries have been a cause of worry during the end of the 20th century with increasing trends among the elderly.
Using data from the Swedish National Patient Register (NPR) based on hospital admissions, this study explores the trends in fall-related fractures between 1998 and 2010.
The data shows a decreasing trend in fall-related fractures in all age- and sex-specific groups apart from men 80 years and above. While hip fracture incidence rates decreased in all age- and sex-specific groups, both central fractures and upper extremity fractures have increased in all age- and sex-specific groups apart from women 65-79 years. Lower extremity fractures have increased in the older age groups and decreased in the younger.
The differences found between the groups of fractures and by age- and sex-specific groups indicate a possible transition where more serious fractures are decreasing while less serious fractures increase among hospitalized cases.
Perhaps due to a focus on hip fracture prevention, this study shows that while the incidence rate of hospitalized hip fractures has decreased, other fall-related hospitalized fractures have increased.
Potentially, this could be indicative of a healthier younger elderly, coupled with a frailer older elderly requiring more comprehensive healthcare also for less serious injuries. Further research is needed to confirm our results.
PubMed ID
23708486 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.