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Loneliness and health care consumption among older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279270
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Sep;29(3):435-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Elin Taube
Jimmie Kristensson
Magnus Sandberg
Patrik Midlöv
Ulf Jakobsson
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Sep;29(3):435-43
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Frail Elderly - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Linear Models
Loneliness
Male
Outpatients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Few studies have investigated loneliness in relation to health care consumption among frail older people. The aim of this study was to examine loneliness, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and health complaints in relation to health care consumption of in- and outpatient care among frail older people living at home. The study, with a cross-sectional design, comprised a sample of 153 respondents aged from 65 years (mean age 81.5 years) or older, who lived at home and were frail. Data was collected utilising structured interviews in the respondent's home assessing demographic data, loneliness, HRQoL and health complaints. Patient administrative registers were used to collect data on health care consumption. Loneliness was the dependent variable in the majority of the analyses and dichotomised. For group comparisons Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test and Chi-square test were used. The results showed that 60% of the respondents had experienced loneliness during the previous year, at least occasionally. The study identified that lonely respondents had a lower HRQoL (p = 0.022), with a higher total number of reported health complaints (p = 0.001), and used more outpatient services including more acute visits at the emergency department, compared to not lonely respondents (p = 0.026). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that a depressed mood was independently associated to total use of outpatient care (B = 7.4, p
PubMed ID
24826811 View in PubMed
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