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Association of Self-Rated Health in Midlife With Mortality and Old Age Frailty: A 26-Year Follow-Up of Initially Healthy Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284814
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Jul;71(7):923-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Emmi Huohvanainen
Arto Y Strandberg
Sari Stenholm
Kaisu H Pitkälä
Reijo S Tilvis
Timo E Strandberg
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Jul;71(7):923-8
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Frail Elderly - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Health status
Humans
Male
Men's health
Middle Aged
Primary Prevention - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the relationship between self-rated health (SRH) in healthy midlife, mortality, and frailty in old age.
In 1974, male volunteers for a primary prevention trial in the Helsinki Businessmen Study (mean age 47 years, n = 1,753) reported SRH using a five-step scale (1 = "very good," n = 124; 2 = "fairly good," n = 862; 3 = "average," n = 706; 4 = "fairly poor," or 5 = "very poor"; in the analyses, 4 and 5 were combined as "poor", n = 61). In 2000 (mean age 73 years), the survivors were assessed using a questionnaire including the RAND-36/SF-36 health-related quality of life instrument. Simplified self-reported criteria were used to define phenotypic prefrailty and frailty. Mortality was retrieved from national registers.
During the 26-year follow-up, 410 men had died. Frailty status was assessed in 81.0% (n = 1,088) of survivors: 434 (39.9%), 552 (50.7%), and 102 (9.4%) were classified as not frail, prefrail, and frail, respectively. With fairly good SRH as reference, and adjusted for cardiovascular risk in midlife and comorbidity in old age, midlife SRH was related to mortality in a J-shaped fashion: significant increase with both very good and poor SRH. In similar analyses, average SRH in midlife (n = 425) was related to prefrailty (odds ratio: 1.52, 95% confidence interval: 1.14-2.04) and poor SRH (n = 31) both to prefrailty (odds ratio: 3.56, 95% confidence interval: 1.16-10.9) and frailty (odds ratio: 8.38, 95% confidence interval: 2.32-30.3) in old age.
SRH in clinically healthy midlife among volunteers of a primary prevention trial was related to the development of both prefrailty and frailty in old age, independent of baseline cardiovascular risk and later comorbidity.
PubMed ID
26774116 View in PubMed
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Depression in older medical inpatients: one-year course and outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209136
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 1997 Mar;12(3):389-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
F R Fenton
M G Cole
F. Engelsmann
I. Mansouri
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, St Mary's Hospital, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 1997 Mar;12(3):389-94
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Dysthymic Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Frail Elderly - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Personality Assessment
Recurrence
Abstract
This 1-year follow-up survey of 214 medical inpatients aged 65 and older describes the outcome of major depressive episode (MDE), determines the incidence of new episodes and identifies factors associated with outcome and with new episodes of MDE.
Follow-up information was obtained from 160 patients, 69 men and 91 women.
Of the 48 cases of MDE who were interviewed, 44% improved. Underlying dysthymic disorder strongly influenced outcome: of 21 cases of MDE alone, 62% were improved at follow-up; of the 27 cases in which MDE was superimposed on dysthymic disorder initially, only 30% were improved. New episodes of MDE occurred in 21% of patients, and were associated with dysthymic disorder initially and with change of meaning of life.
Among older medical inpatients, MDE, particularly when superimposed upon dysthymic disorder, is a persistent condition. Randomized trials are necessary to identify efficacious treatments.
PubMed ID
9152726 View in PubMed
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The disablement process in very late life: a study of the oldest-old in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46134
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2001 Jan;56(1):P12-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
E E Femia
S H Zarit
B. Johansson
Author Affiliation
The Pennsylvania State University, University Park 16802, USA. femia@erols.com
Source
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2001 Jan;56(1):P12-23
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Frail Elderly - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
The study examines physical and functional health problems and their relationship to the activity of daily living (ADL) disability experience of a cross-section of Swedish men and women aged over 80 years (N = 203). Using a model of disablement, the relationships among disability variables were simultaneously explored. Results confirmed relatively high rates of disability in this age group, with 36% of respondents having some basic ADL difficulty. Functional impairments (vision and grip strength) and functional limitations (upper and lower body limitations and cognition) were strongly related to disability, with functional limitations being a main driving force for disability. The role of psychosocial variables (depression, subjective health, and social integration) was explored through subsequent model testing. Results showed depression, subjective health, and social integration to potentially mediate the influence of risk factors, impairments, and limitations in the model. The study suggests that modifying psychosocial experiences can greatly affect the disability experience.
PubMed ID
11192333 View in PubMed
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Does frailty predict hospitalization, emergency department visits, and visits to the general practitioner in older newly-diagnosed cancer patients? Results of a prospective pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147152
Source
Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2010 Nov;76(2):142-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
M T E Puts
J. Monette
V. Girre
C. Wolfson
M. Monette
G. Batist
H. Bergman
Author Affiliation
Solidage Research Group on Frailty and Aging, Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Community Studies, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital Montreal, Canada. martine.puts@utoronto.ca
Source
Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2010 Nov;76(2):142-51
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Female
Frail Elderly - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Neoplasms
Office Visits - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Pilot Projects
Prospective Studies
Utilization Review
Abstract
Research on the use of health care by older newly-diagnosed cancer patients is sparse. We investigated whether frailty predicts hospitalization, emergency department (ED) and general practitioner (GP) visits in older cancer patients in a prospective pilot study. Newly-diagnosed cancer patients aged 65 years and over were recruited in the Segal Cancer Centre, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Canada. One hundred ten patients participated, mean age 74.1, 70% women. During 1 year follow-up, 52 patients (47.3%) had cancer-related hospitalizations, 23 patients (20.9%) had ED visit and 17 patients (15.5%) had GP visit. No frailty marker predicted hospitalization or visits to the GP. Cognitive impairment suspicion was the only frailty marker that predicted ED visits (odds ratio 4.97; 95%CI 1.14-21.69). Although health care use was considerable in this sample, most frailty markers were not associated with health care use in this pilot study.
PubMed ID
19939699 View in PubMed
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A follow-up of elderly depressed patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92822
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):233-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Djernes Jens K
Gulmann Nils Chr
Ibsen Morten
Foldager Leslie
Olesen Frede
Munk-Jørgensen Povl
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrien i Nordjyllands Amt, Gerontopsykiatrisk Afdeling, Brønderslev Psykiatriske Sygehus, Hjørringvej 180, DK-9700 Brønderslev, Denmark. jensdjernes@webspeed.d
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):233-41
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - mortality - psychology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - mortality - psychology
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - mortality - psychology
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Frail Elderly - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Health Services - utilization
Health Status Indicators
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Recurrence
Referral and Consultation - utilization
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The study aims to establish the predictive value of a diagnosis of depression among elderly according to the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) by measuring morbidity, medication usage, health service utilization and mortality during an 8-year follow-up of depressed elderly inpatients (n=76) and community-living depressed patients (n=38) compared with controls (n=116). The data were taken from GPs' medical records and health statistics registers. At baseline, no significant differences were observed between the two cohorts of depressed patients and the controls in terms of prevalence of cardiovascular, respiratory or cerebrovascular morbidity. During follow-up, both cohorts of depressed patients had significantly increased rates of recurrent depressions, consumption of antidepressants, psychiatric in- and outpatient admissions, and home visits; inpatients used more psychiatric hospital days. Health service utilization in somatic hospitals and somatic diagnoses was not significantly increased. Inpatients used significantly fewer GP office-hour services but more out-of-hours services than the control group. Community-living depressed patients experienced no significant increase in use of GP services. Survival was unaffected in both cohorts. In agreement with other studies, especially inpatient depression predicted increased rates of recurrent depressions and increased use of psychiatric hospital services, indicating poor long-term outcome. Inpatients consumed fewer GP office-hour services but more out-of-hours services, possibly due to less office-hour contact. Contrasting with other studies, ICD-10 depression among elderly predicted no increase in the use of somatic hospital facilities.
PubMed ID
18609027 View in PubMed
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Good news and bad news: depressive symptoms decline and undertreatment increases with age in home care and institutional settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130953
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;20(12):1045-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Katarzyna Szczerbinska
John P Hirdes
Jolanta Zyczkowska
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;20(12):1045-56
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Depression - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Frail Elderly - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Geriatric Assessment
Home Care Services
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Ontario
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Skilled Nursing Facilities
Abstract
Examination of prevalence of depressive symptoms among older persons in home care (HC) and complex continuing care (CCC) hospitals/units, factors associated with depressive symptoms in those settings, and rate of antidepressant use among older persons with depressive symptoms.
Observational study using data from interRAI assessments used in normal clinical practice. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with depressive symptoms in the frail elderly and treatment approaches were described.
Fourteen HC agencies and 134 CCC hospitals/units in Ontario, Canada.
Older persons (N = 191,9871) aged 65 years and older, including 114,497 persons from HC and 77,490 persons from CCC.
Data were collected using Resident Assessment Instrument 2.0 (RAI 2.0) (1996-2004) in CCC and Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (RAI-HC) (2003-2004) in HC.
Prevalence of depressive symptoms among older HC enrollees was lower (12.0%) than in CCC (23.6%). It decreased significantly with age in HC (to about 6% in those older than 95 years) but there were not substantial age differences in CCC. Common factors associated with depressive symptoms in both types of care were cognitive impairment, instability of health, daily pain, disability in activities of daily living; however, advanced age lost its protective effect in CCC. Less than half of the persons in HC and CCC with depressive symptoms were treated with antidepressants and their use decreased with age.
Undertreatment of depressive symptoms among older persons remains a serious problem. Learning more about factors associated with depressive symptoms among the oldest old might improve detection and treatment of depression.
PubMed ID
21952123 View in PubMed
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Life satisfaction among older people (65+) with reduced self-care capacity: the relationship to social, health and financial aspects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76495
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2006 May;15(5):607-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Borg Christel
Hallberg Ingalill R
Blomqvist Kerstin
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. christel.borg@bth.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2006 May;15(5):607-18
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Frail Elderly - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Geriatric Assessment
Health status
Humans
Income
Logistic Models
Loneliness
Male
Marital status
Multivariate Analysis
Nurse's Role
Personal Satisfaction
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Self Care - psychology
Social Behavior
Social Isolation
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed at investigating life satisfaction and its relation to living conditions, overall health, self-care capacity, feeling lonely, physical activities and financial resources among people (65+) with reduced self-care capacity. BACKGROUND: Knowledge about factors related to low life satisfaction among older people with reduced self-care capacity is sparse, although this is important in health care and nursing so that the care is adapted to their needs and perspective. Previous research has mainly focused on isolated aspects such as pain in relation to life satisfaction among older people in general and less among so those with reduced self-care capacity in general. DESIGN AND METHOD: A subsample of 522 persons was selected from a randomly selected cross-sectional survey using a modified form of the Older Americans' Resources Schedule and Life Satisfaction Index Z. RESULTS: The mean age in the total sample was 77.9; women (79.5) were significantly older than men (77.0). Low life satisfaction was found among women, as well as those living in special accommodations. Life Satisfaction Index Z was 15.3 (SD 5.6) in the total sample. Gender and living conditions did not explain life satisfaction whilst poor overall self-reported health and poor financial resources in relation to needs had the strongest explanatory value. Also of significant importance were loneliness, the degree of reduced self-care capacity and feeling worried. CONCLUSION: Life satisfaction in older people with reduced self-care capacity is determined by several factors, with social, physical, mental and financial aspects probably interacting with each other; especially feeling lonely, degree of self-care capacity, poor overall health, feeling worried and poor financial resources in relation to needs. These factors need to be considered in the care of these people to preserve or improve their life satisfaction. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nursing interventions in terms of preventive home visits, rehabilitation, health education directed towards physical, psychological, social and economic aspects of importance may help to preserve or improve life satisfaction for those with reduced self-care capacity.
PubMed ID
16629970 View in PubMed
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Loneliness and health care consumption among older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279270
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Sep;29(3):435-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Elin Taube
Jimmie Kristensson
Magnus Sandberg
Patrik Midlöv
Ulf Jakobsson
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Sep;29(3):435-43
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Frail Elderly - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Linear Models
Loneliness
Male
Outpatients - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Life - psychology
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Few studies have investigated loneliness in relation to health care consumption among frail older people. The aim of this study was to examine loneliness, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and health complaints in relation to health care consumption of in- and outpatient care among frail older people living at home. The study, with a cross-sectional design, comprised a sample of 153 respondents aged from 65 years (mean age 81.5 years) or older, who lived at home and were frail. Data was collected utilising structured interviews in the respondent's home assessing demographic data, loneliness, HRQoL and health complaints. Patient administrative registers were used to collect data on health care consumption. Loneliness was the dependent variable in the majority of the analyses and dichotomised. For group comparisons Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test and Chi-square test were used. The results showed that 60% of the respondents had experienced loneliness during the previous year, at least occasionally. The study identified that lonely respondents had a lower HRQoL (p = 0.022), with a higher total number of reported health complaints (p = 0.001), and used more outpatient services including more acute visits at the emergency department, compared to not lonely respondents (p = 0.026). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that a depressed mood was independently associated to total use of outpatient care (B = 7.4, p
PubMed ID
24826811 View in PubMed
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A multistate model of cognitive dynamics in relation to frailty in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135899
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2011 Jul;21(7):507-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Arnold Mitnitski
Nader Fallah
Kenneth Rockwood
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Arnold.Mitnitski@dal.ca
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2011 Jul;21(7):507-16
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cognition
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - mortality
Disease Progression
Female
Frail Elderly - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Poisson Distribution
Prospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To analyze cognitive changes in relation to frailty, using a multistate transition model.
In a prospective cohort study of older Canadians (n = 9266), cognitive states were defined as the errors in the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination score. Frailty states were defined using a Frailty Index based on 40 self-reported deficits. Five-year transition probabilities were modeled by the use of a truncated Poisson distribution with the Poisson mean dependent on the baseline cognitive state, frailty, and other covariates.
In multivariable analyses, age, frailty status, and education level were independently associated with cognitive changes, whereas only age and frailty were related to the risk of death. Frail people less often showed cognitive improvement (13.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 11.8-15) or stabilization (8.9%; 95% CI, 7.5-10.3) compared with non-frail people, of whom 23.9% improved (95% CI, 22.8-25) and 17% (95% CI, 16.1-17.9) maintained their cognitive status. Frail people were more likely to die (47.4%; 95% CI, 44.8%-50%) versus 22.3% (95% CI, 20.1%-24.5%) of non-frail older adults.
A multistate transition model can be used to estimate simultaneously the chances of cognitive improvement/stability, decline, and death, and to analyze how these outcomes depend on frailty and other covariates.
PubMed ID
21435904 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.